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I'm practicing for an internship interview at a ruby shop. One of the job questions I'm expecting is to reimplement an enumerable method.

I'm trying to implement map right now and I'm having trouble figuring out how to implement the case where a block is not given.

class Array
    def mapp()
      out = []
      if block_given?
        self.each { |e| out << yield(e) }
      else
        <-- what goes here? -->
      end
   out
   end
 end

Using my current implementation. If I run:

[1,2,3,4,5,6].mapp{|each| each+1} #returns => [2,3,4,5,6,7]

However, I'm not sure how to get cases where a block isn't passed in:

[1,2,3,4].mapp("cat") # should return => ["cat", "cat", "cat", "cat"]

If someone could point me in the right direction. I'd really appreciate it. I tried looking through the source code but it seems to do things very differently than what i'm used to.

static VALUE
enum_flat_map(VALUE obj)
{
VALUE ary;

RETURN_SIZED_ENUMERATOR(obj, 0, 0, enum_size);

ary = rb_ary_new();
rb_block_call(obj, id_each, 0, 0, flat_map_i, ary);

return ary;
}
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1  
That's the C source. That isn't going to help you much in reimplementing the method in Ruby. Also, why on earth would .mapp("cat") return ["cat", "cat", "cat"]? That doesn't make sense. The built-in .map method throws an exception. –  meagar May 7 '13 at 15:30
1  
Furthermore, that is code for flat_map, not map. To be honest, I think it is too early for you to do a job using Ruby. –  sawa May 7 '13 at 15:32
    
maybe you could look at the sources of Rubinius, e.g. github.com/rubinius/rubinius/blob/master/kernel/bootstrap/… –  poseid May 7 '13 at 15:34
    
Ignore the C code. Chances are, unless you have applied for a very advanced role, the employers just want you to understand yield. The no-block implementation would probably score you extra points though! –  Neil Slater May 7 '13 at 15:38
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4 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

I suppose that by [1,2,3,4].mapp("cat") you mean [1,2,3,4].mapp{"cat"}.

That said, map without a block returns an enumerator:

 [1,2,3,4].map
 => #<Enumerator: [1, 2, 3, 4]:map>

That is the same output of to_enum

[1,2,3,4].to_enum
 => #<Enumerator: [1, 2, 3, 4]:each> 

So in your code, you just want to call to_enum:

class Array
    def mapp()
      out = []
      if block_given?
        self.each { |e| out << yield(e) }
      else
        out = to_enum :mapp
      end
   out
   end
 end
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Thanks! I feel dumb, but that answers my question. –  hhoang May 7 '13 at 16:16
    
@hhoang glad I could help you –  fotanus May 7 '13 at 16:56
    
-1. This will return an Enumerator for each, not mapp. –  Jörg W Mittag May 7 '13 at 21:06
    
@JörgWMittag what is your suggestion? –  fotanus May 8 '13 at 12:40
    
Return an enumerator for mapp instead of each, just like the other answers do. –  Jörg W Mittag May 8 '13 at 13:48
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return to_enum :mapp unless block_given?    

Should be sufficient.

See the Implementation of map of the Rubinius implementation which is entirely in Ruby:

https://github.com/rubinius/rubinius/blob/master/kernel/bootstrap/array19.rb

# -*- encoding: us-ascii -*-

class Array
  # Creates a new Array from the return values of passing
  # each element in self to the supplied block.
  def map
    return to_enum :map unless block_given?
    out = Array.new size

    i = @start
    total = i + @total
    tuple = @tuple

    out_tuple = out.tuple

    j = 0
    while i < total
      out_tuple[j] = yield tuple.at(i)
      i += 1
      j += 1
    end

    out
  end
end
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With rubinius there is a ruby implementation written in ruby wherever possible. You can look at their code for enumerable.#collect

Interesting is the difference between

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This is also a good idea in general. –  fotanus May 7 '13 at 16:57
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Check out the documentation for Object#to_enum

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