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I first want to say that I am new to RequireJS and even newer to Jasmine.

I am having some issues with the SpecRunner and require JS. I have been following the tutorials of Uzi Kilon and Ben Nadel (along with some others) and they helped some but I am still having some issues.

It seems that, if there is an error that is thrown in the test (I can think of one in particular, a type error) the spec runner html will display. This tells me that I have some issues in the javascript. However, after I fix those error no HTML is displayed anymore. I cannot get the test runner to display at all. Can someone find something wrong with my code that would cause this issue?

Here is my directory structure:

Root 
|-> lib
    |-> jasmine
        |-> lib (contains all of the jasmine lib)
        |-> spec
        |-> src
    |-> jquery (jquery js file)
    |-> require (require js file) 
index.html (spec runner) specRunner.js

Here is the SpecRunner (index) HTML:

<!doctype html>
<html lang="en">
    <head>
        <title>Javascript Tests</title>

        <link rel="stylesheet" href="lib/jasmine/lib/jasmine.css">

        <script src="lib/jasmine/lib/jasmine.js"></script>
        <script src="lib/jasmine/lib/jasmine-html.js"></script>
        <script src="lib/jquery/jquery.js"></script>
        <script data-main="specRunner" src="lib/require/require.js"></script>

        <script>
            require({ paths: { spec: "lib/jasmine/spec" } }, [
                    // Pull in all your modules containing unit tests here.
                    "spec/notepadSpec"
                ], function () {
                    jasmine.getEnv().addReporter(new jasmine.HtmlReporter());
                    jasmine.getEnv().execute();
                });
        </script>

    </head>

<body>
</body>
</html>

Here is the specRunner.js (config)

require.config({
    urlArgs: 'cb=' + Math.random(),
    paths: {
        jquery: 'lib/jquery',
        jasmine: 'lib/jasmine/lib/jasmine',
        'jasmine-html': 'lib/jasmine/lib/jasmine-html',
        spec: 'lib/jasmine/spec/'
    },
    shim: {
        jasmine: {
            exports: 'jasmine'
        },
        'jasmine-html': {
            deps: ['jasmine'],
            exports: 'jasmine'
        }
    }
});

Here is a spec:

require(["../lib/jasmine/src/notepad"], function (notepad) {
    describe("returns titles", function() {
        expect(notepad.noteTitles()).toEqual("");


    });
});

The notepad source:

define(['lib/jasmine/src/note'], function (note) {

    var notes = [
        new note('pick up the kids', 'dont forget to pick  up the kids'),
        new note('get milk', 'we need two gallons of milk')
    ];


    return {
        noteTitles: function () {
            var val;

            for (var i = 0, ii = notes.length; i < ii; i++) {
                //alert(notes[i].title);
                val += notes[i].title + ' ';
            }

            return val;
        }
    };
});

And the Note source (JIC):

define(function (){
    var note = function(title, content) {
        this.title = title;
        this.content = content;
    };

    return note;
});

I have made sure that, as far as the app is concerned, the paths are correct. Once I get this working I can play with configuring that paths so that it isn't so yucky.

share|improve this question
    
Could you try this? Defined HtmlReported outside of require. Call only execute inside. var jasmineEnv = jasmine.getEnv(); jasmineEnv.addReporter(new jasmine.HtmlReporter()); require(['suites/aSpec.js'], function(spec){ jasmineEnv.execute(); }); –  basos May 11 '13 at 11:39
1  
For Jasmine 2.0.0 standalone, this answer worked for me: stackoverflow.com/questions/19240302/… –  alpacalips Feb 19 at 19:16

3 Answers 3

up vote 35 down vote accepted

I managed to get this working with some trial and error. The main issue was that when you write specs it isn't a require that you want to create, you want to use define:

Original:

require(["/lib/jasmine/src/notepad"], function (notepad) {
    describe("returns titles", function() {
        expect(notepad.noteTitles()).toEqual("pick up the kids get milk");


    });
});

Working:

define(["lib/jasmine/src/notepad"], function (notepad) {
    describe("returns titles", function () {

        it("something", function() {

            expect(notepad.noteTitles()).toEqual("pick up the kids get milk ");
        });

    });
});

After doing some research it became clear that, when using RequireJS, Anything that you want the require() to use must be wrapped in a define (seems obvious now I guess). You can see that, in the specRunner.js file, a require is used when executing the tests (therefore the need to "define" the specs.

The other issue is that, when creating specs, the define() AND the it() are necessary (not just the define like I had in the posted example).

Original:

describe("returns titles", function() {
        expect(notepad.noteTitles()).toEqual("pick up the kids get milk");


    });

Working:

describe("returns titles", function () {

        it("something", function() {

            expect(notepad.noteTitles()).toEqual("pick up the kids get milk ");
        });

    });

I also changed around where the test runner exists but this was a refactor and did not change the outcome of the tests.

Again, here are the files and the changed:

note.js: stayed the same

notepad.js: stayed the same

index.html:

<!doctype html>
<html lang="en">
    <head>
        <title>Javascript Tests</title>
        <link rel="stylesheet" href="lib/jasmine/lib/jasmine.css">
        <script data-main="specRunner" src="lib/require/require.js"></script>
    </head>

    <body>
    </body>
</html>

specRunner.js:

require.config({
    urlArgs: 'cb=' + Math.random(),
    paths: {
        jquery: 'lib/jquery',
        'jasmine': 'lib/jasmine/lib/jasmine',
        'jasmine-html': 'lib/jasmine/lib/jasmine-html',
        spec: 'lib/jasmine/spec/'
    },
    shim: {
        jasmine: {
            exports: 'jasmine'
        },
        'jasmine-html': {
            deps: ['jasmine'],
            exports: 'jasmine'
        }
    }
});


require(['jquery', 'jasmine-html'], function ($, jasmine) {

    var jasmineEnv = jasmine.getEnv();
    jasmineEnv.updateInterval = 1000;

    var htmlReporter = new jasmine.HtmlReporter();

    jasmineEnv.addReporter(htmlReporter);

    jasmineEnv.specFilter = function (spec) {
        return htmlReporter.specFilter(spec);
    };

    var specs = [];

    specs.push('lib/jasmine/spec/notepadSpec');



    $(function () {
        require(specs, function (spec) {
            jasmineEnv.execute();
        });
    });

});

notepadSpec.js:

define(["lib/jasmine/src/notepad"], function (notepad) {
    describe("returns titles", function () {

        it("something", function() {

            expect(notepad.noteTitles()).toEqual("pick up the kids get milk");
        });

    });
});
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 for The main issue was that when you write specs it isn't a require that you want to create, you want to use define. If you use require, your tests will sometimes work and sometimes not with error no specs found. –  Lukas Cenovsky Dec 30 '13 at 22:37

Just adding this as an alternate answer for people who are you using Jasmine 2.0 standalone. I believe this can work for Jasmine 1.3 also, but the async syntax is different and kind of ugly.

Here is my modified SpecRunner.html file:

<!DOCTYPE HTML>
<html>
<head>
  <meta http-equiv="Content-Type" content="text/html; charset=UTF-8">
  <title>Jasmine Spec Runner v2.0.0</title>

  <link rel="shortcut icon" type="image/png" href="lib/jasmine-2.0.0/jasmine_favicon.png">
  <link rel="stylesheet" type="text/css" href="lib/jasmine-2.0.0/jasmine.css">

  <!-- 
  Notice that I just load Jasmine normally
  -->    
  <script type="text/javascript" src="lib/jasmine-2.0.0/jasmine.js"></script>
  <script type="text/javascript" src="lib/jasmine-2.0.0/jasmine-html.js"></script>
  <script type="text/javascript" src="lib/jasmine-2.0.0/boot.js"></script>

  <!-- 
  Here we load require.js but we do not use data-main. Instead we will load the
  the specs separately. In short we need to load the spec files synchronously for this
  to work.
  -->
  <script type="text/javascript" src="js/vendor/require.min.js"></script>

  <!-- 
  I put my require js config inline for simplicity
  -->
  <script type="text/javascript">
    require.config({
      baseUrl: 'js',
      shim: {
          'underscore': {
              exports: '_'
          },
          'react': {
              exports: 'React'
          }
      },
      paths: {
          jquery: 'vendor/jquery.min',
          underscore: 'vendor/underscore.min',
          react: 'vendor/react.min'
      }
    });
  </script>

  <!-- 
  I put my spec files here
  -->
  <script type="text/javascript" src="spec/a-spec.js"></script>
  <script type="text/javascript" src="spec/some-other-spec.js"></script>
</head>

<body>
</body>
</html>

Now here is an example spec file:

describe("Circular List Operation", function() {

    // The CircularList object needs to be loaded by RequireJs
    // before we can use it.
    var CircularList;

    // require.js loads scripts asynchronously, so we can use
    // Jasmine 2.0's async support. Basically it entails calling
    // the done function once require js finishes loading our asset.
    //
    // Here I put the require in the beforeEach function to make sure the
    // Circular list object is loaded each time.
    beforeEach(function(done) {
        require(['lib/util'], function(util) {
            CircularList = util.CircularList;
            done();
        });
    });

    it("should know if list is empty", function() {
        var list = new CircularList();
        expect(list.isEmpty()).toBe(true);
    });

    // We can also use the async feature on the it function
    // to require assets for a specific test.
    it("should know if list is not empty", function(done) {
        require(['lib/entity'], function(entity) {
            var list = new CircularList([new entity.Cat()]);
            expect(list.isEmpty()).toBe(false);
            done();
        });
    });
});

Here is a link the async support section from the Jasmine 2.0 docs: http://jasmine.github.io/2.0/introduction.html#section-Asynchronous_Support

share|improve this answer
    
It's worth noting that this is the only solution I found that works with node-webkit, combined with the RequireJS r.js plugin, so that I could test my code that imports both AMD and Node.js modules. –  jmort253 May 7 at 19:59

Another option for Jasmine 2.0 standalone is creating a boot.js file and setting it up to run your tests after all of your AMD modules have been loaded.

The ideal end user case for writing tests in our case was to not have to list out all of our spec files or dependencies in once explicit list, and only have the requirement of declaring your *spec files as AMD modules with dependencies.

Example ideal spec: spec/javascript/sampleController_spec.js

require(['app/controllers/SampleController'], function(SampleController) {
  describe('SampleController', function() {
      it('should construct an instance of a SampleController', function() {
        expect(new SampleController() instanceof SampleController).toBeTruthy();
      });
  });
});

Ideally the background behaviour of loading the dependency in and running the specs would be totally opaque to anyone coming on to the project wanting to write tests, and they won't need to do anything other than create a *spec.js file with AMD dependencies.

To get this all working, we created a boot file and configured Jasmine to use it (http://jasmine.github.io/2.0/boot.html), and added some magic to wrap around require to temporarily delay running tests until after we have our deps loaded:

Our boot.js' "Execution" section:

/**
 * ## Execution
 *
 * Replace the browser window's `onload`, ensure it's called, and then run all of the loaded specs. This includes initializing the `HtmlReporter` instance and then executing the loaded Jasmine environment. All of this will happen after all of the specs are loaded.
 */

var currentWindowOnload = window.onload;

// Stack of AMD spec definitions
var specDefinitions = [];

// Store a ref to the current require function
window.oldRequire = require;

// Shim in our Jasmine spec require helper, which will queue up all of the definitions to be loaded in later.
require = function(deps, specCallback){
  //push any module defined using require([deps], callback) onto the specDefinitions stack.
  specDefinitions.push({ 'deps' : deps, 'specCallback' : specCallback });
};

//
window.onload = function() {

  // Restore original require functionality
  window.require = oldRequire;
  // Keep a ref to Jasmine context for when we execute later
  var context = this,
      requireCalls = 0, // counter of (successful) require callbacks
      specCount = specDefinitions.length; // # of AMD specs we're expecting to load

  // func to execute the AMD callbacks for our test specs once requireJS has finished loading our deps
  function execSpecDefinitions() {
    //exec the callback of our AMD defined test spec, passing in the returned modules.
    this.specCallback.apply(context, arguments);        
    requireCalls++; // inc our counter for successful AMD callbacks.
    if(requireCalls === specCount){
      //do the normal Jamsine HTML reporter initialization
      htmlReporter.initialize.call(context);
      //execute our Jasmine Env, now that all of our dependencies are loaded and our specs are defined.
      env.execute.call(context);
    }
  }

  var specDefinition;
  // iterate through all of our AMD specs and call require with our spec execution callback
  for (var i = specDefinitions.length - 1; i >= 0; i--) {
    require(specDefinitions[i].deps, execSpecDefinitions.bind(specDefinitions[i]));
  }

  //keep original onload in case we set one in the HTML
  if (currentWindowOnload) {
    currentWindowOnload();
  }

};

We basically keep our AMD syntax specs in a stack, pop them off, require the modules, execute the callback with our assertions in it, then run Jasmine once everything is done loading in.

This set up allows us to wait until all of the AMD modules required by our individual tests are loaded, and doesn't break AMD patterns by creating globals. There's a little hackery in the fact that we temporarily override require, and only load our app code using require (our `src_dir: in jasmine.yml is empty), but the overall goal here is to reduce the overhead of writing a spec.

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