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The following code compiles correctly on g++ (Debian) with 0 warnings:

#include <list>

template <typename T>
struct A
{
T a;
typedef T value_type;
};


template <typename T>
struct B
{
 typedef std::list < A <T> > Type;
};


template <typename Data>
void test ( Data d, typename Data::value_type::value_type b ) { }


int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
B <double> ::Type b;
double c = 0.0;
test <typename B <double>::Type > (b, c);
return 0;
}

However, after VS 2010 compiler used, the following error occured:

Error   1   error C2770: invalid explicit template
argument(s) for 'void test(Data,Data::value_type::{ctor})

Why is the explicit argument not correct?

Updated question

I am not sure if your advice was understood correctly. You mentioned something like this? However, this construction does not make sense to me.

template <typename Data>
void test ( Data d, typename identity <typename    Data::value_type>::type::value_type  b) { }
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2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

The problem here is that your compiler implements a rule that was present in only a pre-C++11 draft and was added there to make inheriting constructors work when the base class is only known via a typedef. Saying using TypedefName::TypedefName; then makes the using declaration refer to the base class constructors (in your case the parameter type is made incorrectly refering to the constructors of A <double>).

The problem was that this handling was active even outside of using declarations. After a defect report noted that, the handling was reduced to only using declarations. So your code is correct and the compiler is wrong.

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@ Johannes: Thanks for your explanation. But I am not entirely sure how to fix the code. Short example could be helpful... –  justik May 7 '13 at 18:09
1  
@justik i am on my galaxy s2, so that would prove difficult. Try avoiding to say "value_type::value_type". For example try typename identity <typename Data::value_type>::type::value_type –  Johannes Schaub - litb May 7 '13 at 18:14
    
@ Johannes: I tried to use it but still does not work :-( Thanks for your help... –  justik May 7 '13 at 18:23
    
@justik Why aren't you posting that code so we can look whether you modified it as intended? I am glad I could help but I am surprised how quickly you gave up. –  Johannes Schaub - litb May 7 '13 at 19:47
    
@ Johannes: I am not giving up, I was out of the PC :-) I am not sure if I correctly understood your advice. Instead of typename Data::value_type::value_type b the proposed typename identity <typename Data::value_type>::type::value_type will be used? Sorry for the misunderstanding, but your knowledge and rating are really high and I am not so experienced... :-) –  justik May 7 '13 at 20:04

I know it's an old post but just in case it helps anyone (note the addition of the template keyword in the declaration of the second argument of test():

#include <list>

template <typename T>
struct A
{
T a;
typedef T value_type;
};


template <typename T>
struct B
{
 typedef std::list < A <T> > Type;
};


template <typename Data>
void test ( Data d, typename Data::value_type::template value_type b ) { }


int main(int argc, char* argv[])
{
B <double> ::Type b;
double c = 0.0;
test <typename B <double>::Type > (b, c);
return 0;
}

This should compile with VS 2010

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