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I have the following code:

public struct Num<T>
{
    private readonly T _Value;

    public Num(T value)
    {
        _Value = value;
    }

    static public explicit operator Num<T>(T value)
    {
        return new Num<T>(value);
    }
}

...
double d = 2.5;
Num<byte> b = (Num<byte>)d;

This code compiles, and it surprises my. The explicit convert should only accept a byte, not a double. But the double is accepted somehow. When I place a breakpoint inside the convert, I see that value is already a byte with value 2. By casting from double to byte should be explicit.

If I decompile my EXE with ILSpy, I see the next code:

double d = 2.5;
Program.Num<byte> b = (byte)d;

My question is: Where is that extra cast to byte coming from? Why is that extra cast place there? Where did my cast to Num<byte> go to?

EDIT
The struct Num<T> is the entire struct, so no more hidden extra methods or operators.

EDIT
The IL, as requested:

IL_0000: nop
IL_0001: ldc.r8 2.5 // Load the double 2.5.
IL_000a: stloc.0
IL_000b: ldloc.0
IL_000c: conv.u1 // Once again the explicit cast to byte.
IL_000d: call valuetype GeneriCalculator.Program/Num`1<!0> valuetype GeneriCalculator.Program/Num`1<uint8>::op_Explicit(!0) 
IL_0012: stloc.1
IL_0013: ret
share|improve this question
2  
You may want to consider looking at the raw IL rather than the C#. –  Kirk Woll May 7 '13 at 18:20
    
@Kirk: IL added. Makes it even more confusing! :) –  Martin Mulder May 7 '13 at 18:29
    
It appears to me that line IL_000d is doing exactly what you want and that the C# decompilation was in error. –  Kirk Woll May 7 '13 at 18:34
1  
@Daniel Of course not. They're both value types, so they both only can inherit from ValueType. A double holds more information than a byte, so there isn't an implicit conversion to byte, it's a lossy operation. There's an explicit conversion, but it's not being explicitly called. –  Servy May 7 '13 at 18:54
3  
@HansPassant: There's nothing to fix here. The compiler is behaving correctly. (There are subtle bugs that the C# compiler team has "won't fix"d in user defined explicit conversions, but this isn't one of them.) –  Eric Lippert May 7 '13 at 19:46

3 Answers 3

up vote 16 down vote accepted

Let's take a step back and ask some clarifying questions:

Is this program legal?

public struct Num<T>
{
    private readonly T _Value;

    public Num(T value)
    {
        _Value = value;
    }

    static public explicit operator Num<T>(T value)
    {
        return new Num<T>(value);
    }
}

class Program
{
    static void Main()
    {
        double d = 2.5;
        Num<byte> b = (Num<byte>)d;
    }
}

Yes.

Can you explain why the cast is legal?

As Ken Kin pointed out, I explain that here:

http://blogs.msdn.com/b/ericlippert/archive/2007/04/16/chained-user-defined-explicit-conversions-in-c.aspx

Briefly: a user-defined explicit conversion may have a built-in explicit conversion inserted on "both ends". That is, we can insert an explicit conversion either from the source expression to the parameter type of the user-defined conversion method, or from the return type of the user-defined conversion method to the target type of the conversion. (Or, in some rare cases, both.)

In this case we insert a built-in explicit conversion to the parameter type, byte, so your program is the same as if you'd written:

        Num<byte> b = (Num<byte>)(byte)d;

This is desirable behaviour. A double may be explicitly converted to byte, so a double may also be explicitly converted to Num<byte>.

For a complete explanation, read section 6.4.5 "User-defined explicit conversions" in the C# 4 specification.

Why does the IL generated call op_Implicit instead of op_Explicit?

It doesn't; the question is predicated on a falsehood. The above program generates:

  IL_0000:  nop
  IL_0001:  ldc.r8     2.5
  IL_000a:  stloc.0
  IL_000b:  ldloc.0
  IL_000c:  conv.u1
  IL_000d:  call       valuetype Num`1<!0> valuetype Num`1<uint8>::op_Explicit(!0)
  IL_0012:  stloc.1
  IL_0013:  ret

You're looking at an old version of your program probably. Do a clean rebuild.

Are there other situations in which the C# compiler silently inserts an explicit conversion?

Yes; in fact this is the second time that question has come up today. See

C# type conversion inconsistent?

share|improve this answer
    
@Eric: About my op_Explicit vs op_Implict confusion: You are right, I corrected my question. –  Martin Mulder May 8 '13 at 5:23
    
@Eric: Do I understand correctly when I say: When the compiler has to do an explicit conversion (because the code says so), it takes the freedom to use another explicit conversion to get the job done? –  Martin Mulder May 8 '13 at 5:24
    
@MartinMulder: Correct. As I showed on my blog, you can actually get four explicit conversions for the price of one in some contrived cases. However you never get two user-defined conversions for the price of one. If Animal has a UDC to Fruit and Fruit has a UDC to Shape, you can cast Giraffe to Apple and Apple to Triangle, but you can't cast Giraffe directly to Triangle. –  Eric Lippert May 8 '13 at 5:27
    
@Eric: Thanks. But... this story is not over yet... Today I will ask a second question about the same topic. I'll keep you in the loop. (BTW: Your first example code on your blog is not entirly correct. The operator misses a parameter of type Castle.) –  Martin Mulder May 8 '13 at 5:31
1  
@MartinMulder: Because then those user-defined conversions might need conversions on "either side" of them! And now we have to do yet another overload resolution problem, which might lead to yet more overload resolution problems. And what are the odds that the result that comes out the other end is the chain of conversions that the user intended? Pretty low, actually. The feature you're describing would be a bug farm, both for the compiler developers and for the developers using the feature. –  Eric Lippert May 10 '13 at 14:34

First off, let's have a look at Mr. Lippert's blog:

Chained user-defined explicit conversions in C#

The compiler will sometimes1 insert the explicit conversion for us:

  • Part of the blogpost:

    ...

    When a user-defined explicit cast requires an explicit conversion on either the call side or the return side, the compiler will insert the explicit conversions as needed.

    The compiler figures that if the developer put the explicit cast in the code in the first place then the developer knew what they were doing and took the risk that any of the conversions might fail.

    ...

As this question, it's just one of the time of sometimes. What explicit conversion the compiler inserted is like we writing in the following code:

  • Test generic method with explicit conversion

    public static class NumHelper {
        public static Num<T> From<T>(T value) {
            return new Num<T>(value);
        }
    }
    
    public partial class TestClass {
        public static void TestGenericMethodWithExplicitConversion() {
            double d=2.5;
            Num<byte> b=NumHelper.From((byte)d);
        }
    }
    

    and the generated IL of the test method is:

    IL_0000: nop
    IL_0001: ldc.r8 2.5
    IL_000a: stloc.0
    IL_000b: ldloc.0
    IL_000c: conv.u1
    IL_000d: call valuetype Num`1<!!0> NumHelper::From<uint8>(!!0)
    IL_0012: stloc.1
    IL_0013: ret
    

Let's go one step back, to see the test of explicit operator as your question:

  • Test explicit operator

    public partial class TestClass {
        public static void TestExplicitOperator() {
            double d=2.5;
            Num<byte> b=(Num<byte>)d;
        }
    }
    

    and you've already seen the IL before:

    IL_0000: nop
    IL_0001: ldc.r8 2.5
    IL_000a: stloc.0
    IL_000b: ldloc.0
    IL_000c: conv.u1
    IL_000d: call valuetype Num`1<!0> valuetype Num`1<uint8>::op_Explicit(!0)
    IL_0012: stloc.1
    IL_0013: ret
    

Do you notice that they are quite similar? The difference is that the parameter !0 is a generic parameter in a type definition of your original code, and !!0 in the generic method test, is generic parameter in a method definition. You might want to have a look at chapter §II.7.1 of the specification Standard ECMA-335.

However, the most point here, is they both get into the type <uint8>(which is byte) of the generic definition; and as I mentioned above, according to Mr. Lippert's blogpost told us that the compiler sometimes inserts the explicit conversion when you did specify them explicitly!

Finally, as you suppose this is strange behavior of the compiler, and let me guess what is possibly you would think the compiler should do:

  • Test generic method by specifying type parameter:

    public partial class TestClass {
        public static void TestGenericMethodBySpecifyingTypeParameter() {
            double d=2.5;
            Num<byte> b=NumHelper.From<byte>(d);
        }
    }
    

Did I guess correctly? Anyway, what we are interested here, again, the IL. And I cannot wait to see the IL, it is:

0PC4l.png

Ooooops .. seem it's not as what the compiler thought an explicit operator would behaves like.

For conclution, when we specified the conversion explicitly, it's pretty semantic to say that we are expecting to convert one thing to another, the compiler deduced that and insert the obvious necessary convertion of the involved types; and once it found the type involved is not legal to be converted, it complains, just as we specified a more simply wrong conversion, such as (String)3.1415926 ...

Wish it's now more helpful without losing the correctness.

1: It's my personal expression of sometimes, in the blogpost actually is said as needed.


The following is some test for contrasting, when one possibly expect to convert the type with a existent explicit operator; and I put some comments in the code for describing each case:

double d=2.5;
Num<byte> b=(Num<byte>)d; // explicitly
byte x=(byte)d; // explicitly, as the case above

Num<byte> y=d; // no explicit, and won't compile

// d can be `IConvertible`, compiles
Num<IConvertible> c=(Num<IConvertible>)d;

// d can be `IConvertible`; 
// but the conversion operator is explicit, requires specified explicitly
Num<IConvertible> e=d;

// d cannot be `String`, won't compile even specified explicitly
Num<String> s=(Num<String>)d;

// as the case above, won't compile even specified explicitly
String t=(String)d; 

Maybe it's easier to understand.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't understand your answer. Please elaborate. –  Kirk Woll May 7 '13 at 18:25
    
How could Num<byte> b=(Num<byte>)d happen? A cast from double to Num<byte> does not exist. And I do not understand what you are trying to say with the third line of code. –  Martin Mulder May 7 '13 at 18:25
    
@Ken: I see you edited your answer, but still... there is NO explicit conversion from double to Num<byte>. A explicit cast from double to byte DOES exist. So lines 2 should not compile, and yes, line 3 will compile. –  Martin Mulder May 7 '13 at 18:40
    
To your edit, there is an implicit conversion from double to IConvertible, so that makes complete sense, but there is only an explicit conversion from double to byte, which is a very different matter. –  Servy May 7 '13 at 18:56
7  
I don't see why this answer has been voted down. It is correct. –  Eric Lippert May 7 '13 at 19:36

The relevant section of the C# standard (ECMA-334) is §13.4.4. I have emphasized in bold the parts relevant to your code above.

A user-defined explicit conversion from type S to type T is processed as follows:

[omitted]

  • Find the set of applicable conversion operators, U. This set consists of the user-defined and, if S and T are both nullable, lifted implicit or explicit conversion operators (§13.7.3) declared by the classes or structs in D that convert from a type encompassing or encompassed by S to a type encompassing or encompassed by T. If U is empty, there is no conversion, and a compile-time error occurs.

The terms encompassing and encompassed by are defined in §13.4.2.

Specifically, the conversion operator from byte to Num<byte> will be considered when casting double to Num<byte> because byte (the actual parameter type to the operator method) can be implicitly converted to double (i.e. byte is encompassed by the operand type double). User-defined operators like this are only considered for explicit conversions, even if the operator is marked implicit.

share|improve this answer
1  
I've never liked this part of the spec; the whole notion of "encompassing" is messed up. For example: double encompasses byte, and therefore in this example we see that you can insert a built-in conversion from double to byte before the user-defined conversion. But double is neither encompassed by nor encompasses decimal, because neither is implicitly convertible to the other even though both are explicitly convertible to the other. Why is the "encompassing" relation relevant here? Surely the relevant relation is the "is explicitly convertible to" relation. The whole thing is a mess. –  Eric Lippert May 7 '13 at 19:59
    
What is meant by D? It would seem it can't be an open-ended set, since the number of possible conversion operators would otherwise be limitless, but what is it exactly? –  supercat May 7 '13 at 20:22
1  
@supercat: D is defined in the section of the spec not quoted here. If we have a conversion from S to T then D is S0, T0 and all base classes of S0 and T0. S0 and T0 are either S and T, or the their underlying types if they are nullable. So that set is finite. However your criticism does apply elsewhere; there are situations where the spec implies that overload resolution is choosing from an infinite set, which is plainly not the case. Mads is aware of them. –  Eric Lippert May 7 '13 at 21:30
1  
@EricLippert: It makes sense that the compiler wouldn't search in types derived from T, even conversion operators defined in those types might have a better match for S, since the compiler has no way of knowing identifying all the candidate types. It seems odd that the set would include base types of T, though, since that would seem to open the possibility of ambiguous conversions. If conversions exist from Double to a base type of T, and from Byte to T, which will be preferred if one tries to cast a Double to a T, or will the compiler refuse to do either? –  supercat May 7 '13 at 22:03
3  
@KenKin: You're welcome! I've been wanting to write that series for a long time. –  Eric Lippert May 8 '13 at 5:20

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