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I have some classes that are sequentially declared in the same file, however, I would like them to refer to each other. However, classes can only be declared by classes that are above them.

Can I do this by separating them into different .h files and have them #include each other as need be? Or can this be done whilst keeping them in the same file>

Or is this bad practice?

(Specifically, I have one instance of a class A that needs to keep track of multiple instances of class B of a different class-type that may try to interact with class A in no particular order; I need to keep the feedback specific to the class B that is trying to talk to that ONE instantiation of class A...)

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Are you talking about the observer-pattern? –  Johnsyweb May 7 '13 at 18:34
    
Why yes... yes I think I very well may be.... –  user1833028 May 7 '13 at 19:26
    
Then you need to read this: boost.org/doc/libs/release/doc/html/signals2.html –  Johnsyweb May 7 '13 at 19:28
    
I'm not quite at that stage in the project, but thank you... I'll look into that! –  user1833028 May 7 '13 at 19:30
    
If you're trying to (re-)implement the Observer pattern, then you are at that stage in the project. Or even a little bit past it. Save yourself some coding! –  Johnsyweb May 7 '13 at 19:32

5 Answers 5

As long as by "refer" you mean as pointer, this should work:

class Foo;

class Bar {
  Foo* p;
};

class Foo {
  Bar* p;
};
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2  
A reference is fine too. –  syam May 7 '13 at 18:32
    
@syam: You're right. –  Mike Dunlavey May 7 '13 at 18:59
    
I tried to pass a reference to class Foo (ie, this) to a subroutine in class Bar - is this allowed, sir? –  user1833028 May 7 '13 at 19:51
    
Forget the "sir" :) Sure, that should work. Generally those subroutines (methods) should be defined outside the class definitions, so they know the contents of both classes. –  Mike Dunlavey May 7 '13 at 23:58

You can forward declare classes and them define them later in the file:

class A;

class B
{
    // As pointed out by syam this will have to be an A* or A& not just of type A.
    // If this line were:
    // A myA
    // The compiler gives error: field ‘myA’ has incomplete type
    A* myA;
};

class A {};

If at any point you want to access methods or attributes in A from a method in B then you have to make sure that those methods are defined after the definition of A.

class A;

class B
{
    A& myA;
    int getAValue(void); // Can't use myA.value here as value is not declared yet.
};

class A
{
public:
    int value;
};

int B::getAValue(void) {return myA.value;}
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You can use forward declaration.

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You could even introduce a self-referential pointer:

class Foo {
    Foo* parent;
};
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I'd do something like this:

class A;

class B {
private:
    A *parent;
public:
    B() {
        this->parent = 0;
    }
    B(A *parent) {
        this->parent = parent;
    }
    void erase();
};

class A {
private:
    std::vector<B> members;
public:
    void add(const B &x) { members.push_back(x); }
    B *getArray() {
        B *rv = new B[members.size()];
        for(int i=0;i<members.size();++i)
            rv[i] = members[i];
        return rv;
    }
    void remove(B *member) {
        for(std::vector<B>::iterator i = members.begin(); i != members.end(); ++i) {
            if(&(*i) == member) {
                members.erase(i);
                break;
            }
        }
    }
};

void B::erase() {
    if(parent)
        parent->remove(this);
}

The key points:

  • I've declared B first so B can work with instances of A.
  • I've forward-declared A, though, so the compiler knows it's a valid class. This allows B to keep a pointer to the instance of B.
  • However, any methods in B that refer to A need to appear after the definition of A. Otherwise, you'll get error: invalid use of incomplete type ‘struct A’ or similar.
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