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This is my Nginx Server config file

server {
        listen   80;
        location /node {
                proxy_pass      http://127.0.0.1:8080;
                include         /etc/nginx/proxy.conf;
        }
        location /ror {
                root /var/www/ror/public;
                passenger_enabled on;
                proxy_cache        off;
                proxy_pass_header  Server;
        }
        location / {
                root /usr/share/nginx/www;
        }
}

This is mostly a 'HelloWorld' setup to test running Node and RoR simultaneously for a REST server.

The issue is that I need to have servername.com/ror forward to /var/www/ror/public, inorder for RoR to respond. I have tried a few configurations, and cannot figure out how to get it to forward correctly. The issue seems to be that the ror URI segment gets passed on to RoR, which causes it to look for that controller, which returns a 404.

The other configuration, changing root to /var/www works as long as I include /ror/public in the URI.

So, is there a way to perform the sub URI routing on the reverse proxy in this manner?


Ok, so I added the rewrite rule.

location /ror {
        root /var/www/ror/public;
        rewrite ^/ror/(.*)$ /$1 last;
        passenger_enabled on;
        proxy_cache        off;
        proxy_pass_header  Server;
}

The issue, however, is that now it is serving files from the default root, which in my install is /usr/nginx and is completely ignoring the root inside the location block.

**I appreciate the help. This is my first time with Nginx (Typically an Apache Fiend), so I'm having trouble wrapping my head how it's interpreting these commands.

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2 Answers 2

/ror/a.txt is /var/www/ror/public/ror/a.txt in local fs, so you need to use rewrite rule in location /ror.

Like rewrite ^/ror(.*)$ $1;

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

I eventually figured it out.

My VHOST Section:

server {
        #server_name domain.com;
        listen   80;
        root /var/www/rails;

        passenger_enabled on;
        passenger_base_uri /todo;

        rails_spawn_method smart;
        rails_env development;

        proxy_cache off;
        proxy_pass_header Server;

        location /node {
                proxy_pass      http://127.0.0.1:8080;
                include         /etc/nginx/proxy.conf;
        }
}

I ended up creating a new directory called rails, and inside of that I created a symbolic link to the public directory of the actual application.

ln -s /var/www/todo/public /var/www/rails/todo

Also, I was not initializing Passenger correctly, which is why it was not responding and giving back errors. This setup is not ideal, considering I now have to manually add each sub URI application, but it works.

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