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I'm trying to combine 115 files from a single directory together. Here is an example of what the files look like:

FILE ONE

Phenotype    Marker    Value1    Value2    Value3
P1           1:54390   0.2948    0.4837    0.2198
P2           1:54390   0.3482    0.6583    0.1937
P3           1:54390   0.1983    0.1837    0.4177
P4           1:54390   0.9128    0.9930    0.0043
P5           1:54390   0.1938    0.0109    0.6573
P1           1:69402   0.2039    0.2340    0.2346
P2           1:69402   0.0239    0.3545    0.1987
P3           1:69402   0.8239    0.8677    0.4177
P4           1:69402   0.2498    0.3099    0.0765
P5           1:69402   0.0982    0.0198    0.0123

FILE TWO

Phenotype    Marker    Value1    Value2    Value3
P1           9:21048   0.8568    0.1231    0.1654
P2           9:21048   0.1244    0.3213    0.1223
P3           9:21048   0.9869    0.1231    0.4776
P4           9:21048   0.3543    0.7657    0.0033
P5           9:21048   0.1231    0.3213    0.8578
P1           9:87758   0.1231    0.8768    0.4653
P2           9:87758   0.7657    0.5435    0.8845
P3           9:87758   0.9879    0.8437    0.7464
P4           9:87758   0.1231    0.9879    0.5523
P5           9:87758   0.9879    0.9868    0.0006

So basically EACH FILE has a unique set of markers, where all each of the 5 phenotypes (P1, P2, P3, P4, P5) are match up with them.

A couple things:

A. I want ONE file to look like this (below) where the data is organized by the phenotype

Phenotype    Marker    Value1    Value2    Value3
P1           1:54390   0.2948    0.4837    0.2198
P1           1:69402   0.2039    0.2340    0.2346
P1           9:21048   0.8568    0.1231    0.1654
P1           9:87758   0.1231    0.8768    0.4653
P2           1:54390   0.3482    0.6583    0.1937
P2           1:69402   0.0239    0.3545    0.1987
P2           9:21048   0.1244    0.3213    0.1223     
P3           1:54390   0.1983    0.1837    0.4177
P3           1:69402   0.8239    0.8677    0.4177
P3           9:21048   0.9869    0.1231    0.4776
P3           9:87758   0.9879    0.8437    0.7464
P4           1:54390   0.9128    0.9930    0.0043
P4           1:69402   0.2498    0.3099    0.0765
P4           9:21048   0.3543    0.7657    0.0033
P4           9:87758   0.1231    0.9879    0.5523
P5           1:54390   0.1938    0.0109    0.6573
P5           1:69402   0.0982    0.0198    0.0123
P5           9:21048   0.1231    0.3213    0.8578
P5           9:87758   0.9879    0.9868    0.0006 

I'd like to do this in bash. Can anyone provide me with some insight? I'm very new to this language!

B. Once I have this giant file, I'd also like to save separate files based on the Phenotype ( I plan to do some Quality Control steps in the middle), so I would have 5 files for P1, P2, P3, P4, and P5 with their respective data in the other columns)

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4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

To solve A, you could use the approach proposed by spiehr. To solve B:

# Name of your big merged file
BIG_FILE='...'


TYPES='P1 P2 P3 P4 P5'    
for T in $TYPES; do
    # Will reduce the input file to
    # all lines starting with $T, which is one of P1, P2 etc.,
    # and write them to a file named accordingly
    grep "^$T" $BIG_FILE > file_$T
done
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#!awk -f
{
  /Phenotype/ ? hd=$0 : rw[$0]
}
END {
  print hd
  PROCINFO["sorted_in"] = "@ind_str_asc"
  for (each in rw) print each
}
share|improve this answer

To get the header, with column title:

head -1 > tmpfile

the data can be inserted like this:

for file in $(ls); do
    tail -n +2 ${file} >> tmpfile2
done
sort tmpfile2 >> tmpfile
rm tmpfile2

tmpfile will be the file with all data. instead of writing $(ls) you can add another linux command, that list you all relevant files.

For getting only the entries with 'P3' in the first column you can use grep:

grep '^P3' tmpfile | cut -f1 --complement

The cut command is used to cut out the first entry, you probably don't need it anymore.

share|improve this answer
    
This does not cover sorting by Phenotype –  lethal-guitar May 7 '13 at 19:43
    
now it does, kind of typo ... –  spiehr May 7 '13 at 19:45
1  
Use for file in *; do instead of calling ls. –  chepner May 7 '13 at 21:55

I'd write the first step as

{
    sed 1q file1
    sed 1d * | sort
} > file_all

then

awk '
    FNR == 1 {head = $0; next}
    !seen[$1]++ {print head > $1}
    {print > $1}
' file_all

this results in files named "P1", "P2", etc

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