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Came across the following on someone's site and I'm curious to understand the shortcut applied here. I simplified the variables for demo purposes.

 function(){
      _imaboolean || ($element.removeClass("hidden").addClass("visible"), this.imaboolean = !0)
 }

Same thing with

this._imaboolean && ($element.removeClass("visible").addClass("hidden"), this._imaboolean = !1)
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marked as duplicate by Antony, Mark Reed, Matt Ball, Chris, dsg May 7 '13 at 19:40

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1  
Too "clever" and confusing. –  user2246674 May 7 '13 at 19:32
    
The spacing is great though, if you read it out loud –  Tim Vermaelen May 7 '13 at 19:32
    
@user2246674 poor readability of this example notwithstanding, it's fairly idiomatic JS, as the sheer number of SO questions suggests. –  Matt Ball May 7 '13 at 19:40
    
@MattBall Unfortunately .. :( –  user2246674 May 7 '13 at 19:46

5 Answers 5

up vote 5 down vote accepted

That is some awful "clever" code, however, let's decompose it!

_imaboolean || ($element.removeClass("hidden").addClass("visible"), this.imaboolean = !0)

First, let's replace all the expressions with placeholders (note these expressions are not pure and have side-effects):

a || (b, c)

Note that || is short-circuiting such that the right expression - (b, c) - will only be evaluated if a evaluates to a false-y value.

So, let's assume that a evaluates to a false-y value, then (b, c) is evaluated. In this case the , operator separates sub-expressions; all the sub-expressions are evaluated in order. The result of the expression is the result of the last sub-expression.

This means it is roughly equivalent to (although there is no function or binding context and the result is thrown out anyway):

(function () { b; return c })()

Did that make sense? No, of course not!

Write it like you mean it:

if (!_imaboolean) {
  $element.removeClass("hidden").addClass("visible");
  this.imaboolean = true; // get rid of !0 too
}
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Thank you for this. Extremely clear example!!! –  cusejuice May 7 '13 at 19:39

This code can be inflated to:

function() {
    if (!this.imaboolean) {
        $element.removeClass("hidden").addClass("visible");
        this.imaboolean = true;
    }
}

The || is used as a short circuit, if imaboolean is true it will break out, however if it's false it will execute the remaining portion of the expression. !0 is a minified way of saying true (because 0 evaluates to false in a boolean expression).

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why !0, 1 would be a more minified and more straighforward way for true –  gbtimmon May 7 '13 at 19:35
    
@gbtimmon !0 !== 1 –  user2246674 May 7 '13 at 19:39
1  
@gbitmmon Because 1 is not a boolean expression and therefore evaluates to 1 when !0 evaluates to false - a boolean value. That is why. –  Brandon Buck May 7 '13 at 19:41
    
@gbtimmon !0 !== 1; 1 !== true; !0 === true - that is, 1 is not a direct replacement for !0. The previous comment contains an error (it should have been "!0 evaluates to true"), but had the idea correct. While truth-y/false-y usually works as intended, there are subtle differences - consider jQuery.extend where the first parameter can be an object or a boolean. –  user2246674 May 7 '13 at 19:49
    
@user2246674 I don't buy it. 1 is just as truthy and 0 is falsey. Try 1||alert('test'); and see what happens. 1 is considered true there. And (!0 == 1) doesnt matter. There is an implict cast to boolean in the || operator so what you are concerned with is toBoolean(!0) === toBoolean(1) which is always true. –  gbtimmon May 7 '13 at 19:50

I believe it is short for

 function(){
      if( ! _imaboolean){
         $element.removeClass("hidden").addClass("visible");
         this.imaboolean = true; 
     }
 }

Its also generally terrible coding in my opinion and should not be copied.

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1  
I wouldn't say it's terrible, it looks minified. In which case the source is probably not written that way. –  Brandon Buck May 7 '13 at 19:34
    
@izuriel it doesn't look minified... This is not how minified code look. –  PSL May 7 '13 at 19:34
1  
Even if it isn't minified, "terrible" is a stretch. "Harder to maintain", maybe, but "terrible"? Nah. It isn't eval. –  Chris May 7 '13 at 19:35
    
I'm of the school that hard to maintain == terrible, but like i said, thats my opinion. –  gbtimmon May 7 '13 at 19:37
    
@gbtimmon Not sure what site it was scrapped from but it was pulled from a site and modified for demo purposes (as the asker stated). Other than that, I've seen this done commonly when a more complex minification process is used like the Closure Compiler. But I was just making the statement to provide a secondary argument against the code being "terrible" which it definitely is not if it's been minified. –  Brandon Buck May 7 '13 at 19:39

It's a short-circuit evaluation where the second part will only be evaluated if the first part fails.

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function(){
      _imaboolean || ($element.removeClass("hidden").addClass("visible"), this.imaboolean = !0)
 }

Let's break this down. First we see the || operator, so we have (statement) || (anotherStatement). The way || works is that it evaluates the first statement. If that evaluates to true, it short-circuits and does not evaluate the second statement. The first statement is just _imaboolean. If that's a truthy value (i.e., not 0 or false or undefined...), then we stop right there and don't go to the second statement.

The second statement is

($element.removeClass("hidden").addClass("visible"), this.imaboolean = !0)

Again, there's two statements, separated by a comma. The comma operator evaluates BOTH statements, and returns the last one. So it evaluates $element.removeClass("hidden").addClass("visible") (which sets some classes on $element), and then it evaluates this.imaboolean = !0 (which sets this.imaboolean to a truthy value). The next time this function is run, it will short circuit due to the || operator.

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