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I would like to delete selected columns in a numpy.array . This is what I do:

n [397]: a = array([[ NaN,   2.,   3., NaN],
   .....:        [  1.,   2.,   3., 9]])

In [398]: print a
[[ NaN   2.   3.  NaN]
 [  1.   2.   3.   9.]]

In [399]: z = any(isnan(a), axis=0)

In [400]: print z
[ True False False  True]

In [401]: delete(a, z, axis = 1)
Out[401]:
 array([[  3.,  NaN],
       [  3.,   9.]])

In this example my goal is to delete all the columns that contain NaN's. I expect the last command to result in:

array([[2., 3.],
       [2., 3.]])

How can I do that?

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up vote 23 down vote accepted

Given its name, I think the standard way should be delete:

A = scipy.delete(A, 1, 0)  # delete second row of A
B = scipy.delete(B, 2, 0)  # delete third row of B
C = scipy.delete(C, 1, 1)  # delete second column of C
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3  
I believe you should be referencing numpy, not scipy. docs.scipy.org/doc/numpy/reference/generated/numpy.delete.html – hlin117 Mar 26 '15 at 3:37

Another way is to use masked arrays:

import numpy as np
a = np.array([[ np.nan,   2.,   3., np.nan], [  1.,   2.,   3., 9]])
print(a)
# [[ NaN   2.   3.  NaN]
#  [  1.   2.   3.   9.]]

The np.ma.masked_invalid method returns a masked array with nans and infs masked out:

print(np.ma.masked_invalid(a))
[[-- 2.0 3.0 --]
 [1.0 2.0 3.0 9.0]]

The np.ma.compress_cols method returns a 2-D array with any column containing a masked value suppressed:

a=np.ma.compress_cols(np.ma.masked_invalid(a))
print(a)
# [[ 2.  3.]
#  [ 2.  3.]]

See manipulating-a-maskedarray

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This creates another array without those columns:

  b = a.compress(logical_not(z), axis=1)
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2  
cool. I wish matlab's syntax worked here: "a(:,z) = []" is much simpler – bgbg Oct 29 '09 at 11:22
1  
similar: b = a[:,[1,2]] – Paul Oct 29 '09 at 11:52
    
@bpowah: indeed. the more general way would be b = a[:,z]. You might want to update your answer accordingly – bgbg Oct 29 '09 at 12:12

From Numpy Documentation

np.delete(arr, obj, axis=None) Return a new array with sub-arrays along an axis deleted.

>>> arr
array([[ 1,  2,  3,  4],
       [ 5,  6,  7,  8],
       [ 9, 10, 11, 12]])
>>> np.delete(arr, 1, 0)
array([[ 1,  2,  3,  4],
       [ 9, 10, 11, 12]])

>>> np.delete(arr, np.s_[::2], 1)
array([[ 2,  4],
       [ 6,  8],
       [10, 12]])
>>> np.delete(arr, [1,3,5], None)
array([ 1,  3,  5,  7,  8,  9, 10, 11, 12])
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Example from the numpy documentation:

>>> a = array([[ 0,  1,  2,  3],
               [ 4,  5,  6,  7],
               [ 8,  9, 10, 11],
               [12, 13, 14, 15]])

>>> delete(a, s_[1:3], axis=0)                       # remove rows 1 and 2

array([[ 0,  1,  2,  3],
       [12, 13, 14, 15]])

>>> delete(a, s_[1:3], axis=1)                       # remove columns 1 and 2

array([[ 0,  3],
       [ 4,  7],
       [ 8, 11],
       [12, 15]])
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In your situation, you can extract the desired data with:

a[:, -z]

"-z" is the logical negation of the boolean array "z". This is the same as:

a[:, logical_not(z)]
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>>> A = array([[ 1,  2,  3,  4],
               [ 5,  6,  7,  8],
               [ 9, 10, 11, 12]])

>>> A = A.transpose()

>>> A = A[1:].transpose()
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