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130723,-001,1.14,130725,+002,4.20,130731,+006,1.52,130728
130725,+002,4.20,130731,+006,1.52,130728,-003,0.00,130731
130731,+006,1.52,130728,-003,0.00,130731,+003,1.00,130731
130728,-003,0.00,130731,+003,1.00,130731,+000,0.00,130729
130731,+000,0.00,130729,-002,1.00,130728,-001,0.00,130728

the above is part of a log file. Each line in the log file is always the same length and has the same pattern as you can see above. I need to read the file and place in an array all the lines where position 42 to 46 in each line meet certain expectations. In the case above we are looking at the following numbers:

+006 -003 +003 +000 -001

Can someone point me in the right direction?

EDIT :

Thx to Amon for his suggestion.

I ended up with this code for future reference.

open (FILE, $filename) or die "Couldn't open log: $!";
while (<FILE>) { 
if ((split /,/)[8] == "+003"){
push @data, $_ }}

close FILE;

foreach(@data)
{
    print "$_\r\n";
}

I was thinking towards the future if this file gets really big what steps should I take to optimise the process speedwise?

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5  
The file format looks simple enough for splitwhile (<>) { push @numbers, (split /,/)[7] } –  amon May 7 '13 at 20:45
2  
Try writing something yourself and then if it doesn't work, bring it to us to help you along. You start it, we help. We don't write it for you. Show us the actual code that you've tried and then we can help you from there. Chances are you'll get pretty close to the answer if you just try it yourself first. –  Andy Lester May 7 '13 at 21:03
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3 Answers

If you want to do it by column numbers, then substr() is usable with care:

perl -pe '$_ = substr($_, 41, 4) . "\n"' data

Your question asks for columns 42..46, but with an inclusive notation, that selects 5 positions, the last of which is a comma. Specifying 42..46 is perhaps the 1-based half-open range of columnns.

The 41 in the code is 'column 42 - 1' (0-based indexes); the 4 is '46 - 42'. So, for columns [N..M), the formula would be:

perl -pe '$_ = substr($_, N-1, M-N) . "\n"' data
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While @amon's answer is elegant, you can just use regex:

open FILE, "filename.txt" or die $!;
while (<FILE>) {
    if $_ =~ /^.{41}(\+006)|(-003)|(\+003)|(\+000)|(-001)/
}
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Why would you open the file for overwrite then try to read from it? If the OP tries this code, he risks losing his input file. Lets hope he made backups. Also, your if-statement does not compile. –  TLP May 7 '13 at 21:45
    
@TLP sorry, typo –  mattexx May 7 '13 at 22:08
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Try

perl -F, -ane '$F[7] eq "+003" and push @l,$_; END { print for @l }'<<XXX
130723,-001,1.14,130725,+002,4.20,130731,+006,1.52,130728
130725,+002,4.20,130731,+006,1.52,130728,-003,0.00,130731
130731,+006,1.52,130728,-003,0.00,130731,+003,1.00,130731
130728,-003,0.00,130731,+003,1.00,130731,+000,0.00,130729
130731,+000,0.00,130729,-002,1.00,130728,-001,0.00,130728
XXX

Output:

130731,+006,1.52,130728,-003,0.00,130731,+003,1.00,130731
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