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I have an input box that should allow numbers/currency only. For this purpose I use the InputScope "CurrencyAmount".

When I run the code a numeric keyboard will pop up but the user is allowed to enter many decimal point instead of just one.

Example: Inputs like "12.50" should be allowed in the textbox, but the user is able to enter value like "12....50", "..12.5....0" etc. instead.

How can I restrict the allowed textbox values to match my criterium?

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Validate the input? –  vcsjones May 7 '13 at 20:56

3 Answers 3

you can try subscribing to TextChanged event for textbox and run below validation - works well for other locales too apart from en-US.

string decimalsep = CultureInfo.CurrentCulture.NumberFormat.CurrencyDecimalSeparator;
int decimalSepCount = text1.Text.Count(f => f == decimalsep[0]);
if (decimalSepCount > 1)
{
   MessageBox.Show("Invalid input");
}
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This works perfectly to validate my input however I also meant how to physically block user from typing few decimal point in my GUI text box. I'm beginner in C#, I understand your code fully except (f => f == decimalsep[0]). Would you mind explaining? Thank you, Matthew. –  Matthew C May 8 '13 at 14:13
    
In Windows Phone, you can't control the behavior of keyboard input except choosing the keyboard layout (like numbers, text, mail, URL etc.)- not supported at the moment. On the other question, it is simply counting the decimal separator character in the text box (using Linq). –  Mahender May 8 '13 at 14:18
    
I have seen apps that allow user to input only one decimal point. How did they implemented that? –  Matthew C May 8 '13 at 14:55
    
they check in an event for example key_down whether there is already a decimal point in the textbox value, if so the do not allow another decimal point by setting e.handle = false within the event. –  MUG4N May 8 '13 at 22:27
    
btw f => f == decimalsep[0] is a lambda expression representing a predicate in this sample –  MUG4N May 8 '13 at 22:29

I would append a key down event handler to your textbox and validate if your input matches your predicate.

Pseudocode:

//...
//register event handler
yourTextBox.KeyDown += new KeyEventHandler(yourTextBox_KeyDown);
//...

//the keydown event
public void yourTextBox_KeyDown(object sender, KeyEventArgs e)
{
    if (System.Text.RegularExpressions.Regex.IsMatch(yourTextBox.Text,"<enter a regular expression here>"))
         e.Handled = true;
    else e.Handled = false;
}
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I'm a beginner in C#. Would you mind explaining where to register event handler? Dos it go into public void Initialize() method? Thanks, Matthew. –  Matthew C May 8 '13 at 14:18
    
I would put it into the constructor of your page –  MUG4N May 8 '13 at 22:25

I would go with a behavior and a regex. Then you can easily reuse your code for other textboxes as well.

 public class RegexValidationBehavior : Behavior<TextBox>
{
    public static readonly DependencyProperty RegexStringProperty =
        DependencyProperty.Register("RegexString", typeof(string), typeof(RegexValidationBehavior), new PropertyMetadata(string.Empty));

    public string RegexString
    {
        get { return GetValue(RegexStringProperty) as string; }
        set { SetValue(RegexStringProperty, value); }
    }      

    protected override void OnAttached()
    {
        base.OnAttached();

        if (AssociatedObject != null)
        {
            AssociatedObject.TextChanged += OnTextChanged;
        }
        Validate();
    }

    protected override void OnDetaching()
    {
        base.OnDetaching();

        if (AssociatedObject != null)
        {
            AssociatedObject.TextChanged -= OnTextChanged;
        }
    }

    private void OnTextChanged(object sender, TextChangedEventArgs e)
    {
        Validate();
    }

    private void Validate()
    {
        var value = AssociatedObject.Text;
        if (value.IsNotEmpty() && RegexString.IsNotEmpty())
        {
            MatchAgainstRegex(value);
        }
    }

    private void MatchAgainstRegex(string value)
    {            
        var match = Regex.Match(value, RegexString);
        if (!match.Success)
        {
            AssociatedObject.Text = value.Remove(value.Length - 1);
            AssociatedObject.Select(AssociatedObject.Text.Length, 0);
        }           
    }
}

Then in your XAML write something like.

<TextBox InputScope="Number" Text="{Binding Amount, Mode=TwoWay}">
   <i:Interaction.Behaviors>
      <Control:RegexValidationBehavior RegexString="{Binding OnlyTwoDecimalsRegex}"/>
   </i:Interaction.Behaviors>
</TextBox>

In your ViewModel you specify a Regex, for example

public string OnlyTwoDecimalsRegex { get { return @"^([0-9]+)?([,|\.])?([0-9]{1,2})?$"; } }
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