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The following code gives a cross/jump label initialization compile errors, of course. But how do I get the effect I'm trying to achieve? That is, only instantiating the class I really need, and then generically calling the method which is common to all classes?

Class A and class B are actually not in my code, but in a large library I'm using, so can't be changed to help. They are NOT children of a superclass (which would solve the problem).

Both real classes handle similar data, so are compatible in the way illustrated below with the filter() method. I know a number of ugly C hacks which might be used to make it work, but I am looking for C++ idiomatic solutions.

In the real problem, there is a lot more code and many more cases, and the constructor and class methods are resource intensive, so I can't just init all possible classes "just in case" and then pick the right filter() method with the switch ().

#include <string>
#include <iostream>
class A {
public:
    std::string msg;
    A(std::string s) { msg = s;}
    void filter() { std::cout << "Message A = " << msg << std::endl;}
};

class B {
public:
    std::string msg;
    B(std::string s) { msg = s;}
    void filter() { std::cout << "The B message: " << msg << std::endl;}
};

int main() {
    int type = 1;
    switch (type) {
    case 1:
        A f("hi from A");
        break;
    case 2:
        B f("hello from B");
        break;
    }
    f.filter();
}

EDIT: Based on @stefan's answer, I revised my code to look like what's below. I haven't tried it in the real situation yet, but I believe it will work. (Thanks all!)

#include <string>
#include <iostream>
class A {
public:
    std::string msg;
    A(std::string s) { msg = s;}
    void filter() { std::cout << "Message A = " << msg << std::endl;}
};

class B {
public:
    std::string msg;
    B(std::string s) { msg = s;}
    void filter() { std::cout << "The B message: " << msg << std::endl;}
};

template <class F>
void doFilterStuff(std::string msg) {
    F f(msg);
    f.filter();
}

int main() {
    for (int i=1; i<4; i++) {
        std::cout << "Type = " << i << std::endl;
        switch (i) {
        case 1:
            doFilterStuff<A>("hi from A");
            break;
        case 2:
            doFilterStuff<B>("hello from B");
            break;
        default:
            std::cout << "Throwing an error exception" << std::endl;
        }
    }
}
share|improve this question
1  
See Boost.Variant. –  ildjarn May 7 '13 at 22:42
3  
First step. Finding an appropriate title. Seriously, I don't even bother to read if you don't find a title. –  stefan May 7 '13 at 22:43
    
Could you suggest how one goes about titling a problem which does not fit neatly into easily described categories known to the author? –  CXJ May 7 '13 at 22:48
    
Well it's way better now. –  stefan May 7 '13 at 22:49
3  
Thanks for the suggestion regarding classes without common base. I've retitled and hopefully improved it. –  CXJ May 7 '13 at 23:00

6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Using templates can solve this:

template <class F>
void doFilterStuff()
{
   F f("Your string");
   f.filter();
}

int main()
{
   doFilterStuff<A>();
   doFilterStuff<B>();
}

Benefit from this: Less code, more abstraction, no boilerplate code. The compiler checks if all instantiations of the templated method are compatible: E.g. an instantiation with class C which does not provide the filter-method would result in a compile time error.

Templates are made for what this problem is all about: to provide same functionality for unconnected types which expose at least in part the same interface.

@NikBougalis correctly points out in the comments, that if you need to call special methods for each type, things get a bit ugly with templates, however it's perfectly feasible. Sample code is a bit too long, so I created this demo.

share|improve this answer
    
I don't think this particular answer is very helpful to the OP. –  Nik Bougalis May 7 '13 at 23:00
    
@NikBougalis why do you think that way? –  stefan May 7 '13 at 23:00
    
@stefan The OP's scenario, as shown here, involves only a single function call. But in reality, he might need to execute more on the same instance of this "magical multi-type object", and he might need to intersperse other operations between those calls. It's not a bad idea, but I think it's a little "limiting". To be fair, I think my solution suffers from a similar issue as well, so don't think I'm picking on you. –  Nik Bougalis May 7 '13 at 23:07
    
@NikBougalis Correct, templates can't solve those problems very elegant. However it probably is worth the effort to break down the logic of the program and have a few template specializations here and there. –  stefan May 7 '13 at 23:10
1  
@NikBougalis I've added a bit about the issue involving specialized function calls. If one likes the template style, this surely isn't the worst way to go ;-) –  stefan May 7 '13 at 23:22

This works, though is somewhat nasty:

#include <string>
#include <iostream>
class A {
public:
    std::string msg;
    A(std::string s) { msg = s;}
    void filter() { std::cout << "Message A = " << msg << std::endl;}
};

class B {
public:
    std::string msg;
    B(std::string s) { msg = s;}
    void filter() { std::cout << "The B message: " << msg << std::endl;}
};

// -------------

class Base
{
public:
  virtual void filter() = 0;
  virtual ~Base() {}
};

template<class C>
class Wrapper: public Base
{
public:
    Wrapper( C * impl ): m_impl(impl)   { }
    ~Wrapper()                          { delete m_impl; }

    virtual void filter()
    {
        m_impl->filter();
    }

private:
    C * m_impl;
};


// -------------

int main() {
    Base * f = NULL;

    int type = 1;
    switch (type) {
    case 1:
        f = new Wrapper<A>(new A("hi from A"));
        break;
    case 2:
        f = new Wrapper<B>(new B("hello from B"));
        break;
    }
    f->filter();
    delete f;
}

And the C++11, exception-safe variant with perfect forwarding of the constructors. Just Wrapper and main() are different from above, here they are:

template<typename T>
class Wrapper : public Base
{
public:
    template<typename... Args>
    Wrapper(Args&&... args) : m_impl(std::forward<Args>(args)...) {}

    virtual void filter() {
        m_impl.filter();
    }

private:
    T m_impl;
};

// -------------

int main()
{
    std::unique_ptr<Base> f;

    int type = 1;
    switch (type) {
    case 1:
        f.reset(new Wrapper<A>("hi from A"));
        break;
    case 2:
        f.reset(new Wrapper<B>("hello from B"));
        break;
    }
    f->filter();
}
share|improve this answer
1  
That's actually not that nasty... –  Nik Bougalis May 7 '13 at 22:51
    
A less nasty approach would involve C, not C*, being a member of Wrapper, with specialisations to provide constructors where they differ. The set of declarations would get more verbose, but it'll be much nicer at the point of use and have one less level of indirection. It's ten to midnight here though so I'll leave that to someone else :) –  moonshadow May 7 '13 at 22:57
    
deleting object of abstract class type ‘Base’ which has non-virtual destructor will cause undefined behaviour. Also, smart pointers instead of naked pointers, this is extremely brittle as it is. –  syam May 7 '13 at 22:58
1  
Great. :) Let's just hope that neither A::filter nor B::filter throw. ;) +1 at any rate, I like that template job. –  syam May 7 '13 at 23:12
1  
@moonshadow: re. your first comment actually in C++11 it's a piece of cake to add perfect forwarding for constructors so here it is. –  syam May 8 '13 at 0:01

So the idea is this: We define a new class AB, which has an "interface" similar to the interface we expecte from A and B. This new class internally contains pointers to A and B which are dynamically allocated - this allows us to define the "identity" of the object at runtime by creating an instance of this new class, and instructing AB to construct either an A or a B, as necessary.

All accesses to A and B are through the interface that AB exposes.

class AB {
    A *a;
    B *b;

public:
    AB()
        : a(nullptr), b(nullptr)
    { }

    ~AB() 
    {
        delete a;
        delete b;
    }

    void CreateA(std::string s)
    {
        if((a != NULL) || (b != NULL))
            return;

        a = new A(s);
    }

    void CreateB(std::string s)
    {
        if((a != NULL) || (b != NULL))
            return;

        b = new B(s);
    }

    void filter() 
    { 
        if(a)
        {
            a->filter();
            return;   
        }

        if(b) 
        {
            b->filter();
            return;
        }
    }
};



int main() {
    int type = 1;

    AB ab;

    switch (type) {
    case 1:
        ab.CreateA("hi from A");
        break;
    case 2:
        ab.CreateB("hello from B");
        break;
    }

    ab.filter();           
}
share|improve this answer
    
Some explanation might be nice... –  Approaching Darkness Fish May 7 '13 at 22:51
    
@ValekHalfHeart: we aim to please. –  Nik Bougalis May 7 '13 at 23:01
    
I think this might solve my problem. It sort of creates the missing base or super class that the library developers should probably have used when creating their classes. I'll have to give it a try to be sure, as my question was a very simplified form of the actual problem. –  CXJ May 7 '13 at 23:10

Aassuming You have objects of A or B already somewehere and theirs destruction is not the case, in C++11 You can use std::function and std::bind

#include <string>
#include <iostream>
#include <functional>

struct A {
    std::string msg;
    A(std::string const & s)  : msg(s) {}
    void filter() { std::cout << "Message A = " << msg << std::endl;}
};

struct B {
    std::string msg;
    B(std::string s) : msg(s) {}
    void filter() { std::cout << "The B message: " << msg << std::endl;}
};

int main() {
    int type = 1;
    //assuming You have objects already somewehere
    A a("hi from A");
    B b("hello from B");

    std::function<void()> filter_func;
    switch (type) {
    case 1:
        filter_func = std::bind( &A::filter, &a );
        break;
    case 2:
        filter_func = std::bind( &B::filter, &b );
        break;
    default:
      throw "Missing case";
    }
    filter_func();
}
share|improve this answer

Actually, that is not doing what you expect, you are using two different (unrelated) classes to to produce f, and then calling f.filter() - which will always use the B variant, except sometimes it won't be initialized.

You can fix it by moving the f.filter into each case, and wrapping with braces:

switch (type) {
case 1:
    {
      A f("hi from A");
      f.filter();
    }
    break;
case 2:
    {
      B f("hello from B");
      f.filter();
    }
    break;
}

This will do what you expect.

Another option is to make a base-class with a virtual filter function and derive from that. Then use a pointer to the class, and call new to create the A or B class. Something like this:

class Base
{
public:
    std::string msg;
    virtual void filter() = 0;
};       

class A: public Base {
public:
    A(std::string s) { msg = s;}
    void filter() { std::cout << "Message A = " << msg << std::endl;}
};

class B : public Base {
public:
    B(std::string s) { msg = s;}
    void filter() { std::cout << "The B message: " << msg << std::endl;}
};

int main() {
    int type = 1;
    Base *f = NULL;
    switch (type) {
    case 1:
        f = new A("hi from A");
        break;
    case 2:
        f = new B("hello from B");
        break;
    }
    if (f)
      f->filter();
    else
       cout << "Huh? Didn't set 'f', bad type?" << endl;      

    delete f;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I understand your example, but I cannot change the definition of class A and B as they are in a library. Still, it gives me some ideas. –  CXJ May 7 '13 at 22:56

In your example f is a local variable.

You can try something like this

class Base{
public :
 virtual ~Base(){}
 virtual void filter(){}
};

class A : public Base{
public :
A(const char * str){}
void filter(){}
};

class B : public Base{
public :
B(const char * str){}
void filter(){}
};

int main(){
int type = 1;
Base *f = 0;
switch (type) {
case 1:
    f = new A("hi from A");
    break;
case 2:
    f = new B("hello from B");
    break;
}
if (f)
f->filter();

}

If you can't get a common base class, you have to use a wrapper

share|improve this answer
    
The OP explicitly said that they couldn't use polymorphism. –  Approaching Darkness Fish May 7 '13 at 23:01

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