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I have a static StreamWriter field for a log file I need to access through a lambda function that listens to StandardOutput on a long-running Process.

I'm using the null/not-null status of the field to determine if the Process is busy on another thread; the actions need to be performed sequentially.

My question is, what happens when I set my variable to null inside a using block? Will it still get disposed properly?

public class Service
{
    private static StreamWriter logger;

    void Run(string logFile)
    {
        using (logger = new StreamWriter(logFile))
        {
            /* ... */

            logger = null;
        }
    }
}
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It will work but it's not recommended. –  Henk Holterman May 7 '13 at 23:08
    
And it might not be thread-safe. –  Henk Holterman May 7 '13 at 23:17
    
But internally, does the compiler hold a different kind of reference to the object inside the using() parentheses? Or does it remember my field's name and go against that when it's ready to call Dispose()? –  J Bryan Price May 7 '13 at 23:23
    
There's only 1 kind of reference, the using(){} just makes a copy. –  Henk Holterman May 7 '13 at 23:25
    
My mistake; clearly the same 'kind of' reference. I should have left that phrase out. –  J Bryan Price May 8 '13 at 5:29

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

According to the C# reference, § 8.13, your code:

private static StreamWriter logger;

using (logger = new StreamWriter(logFile))
{
   /* ... */
   logger = null;
}

is equivalent to

private static StreamWriter logger;


{  // using scope
   logger = new StreamWriter(logFile);
   IDisposable resource = logger;       // hidden var inserted by the compiler 
   try
   {
     /* ... */
     logger = null;
   }
   finally
   {
      if (resource != null)  
        resource.Dispose();
   }
}

The relevant quote:

A using statement of the form

    using (expression) statement

has the same three possible expansions, but in this case ResourceType is implicitly the compile-time type of the expression, and the resource variable is inaccessible in, and invisible to, the embedded statement.

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This is not a problem. You'd have to look at the IL with ildasm.exe to see how the compiler does this. But it generates an extra variable to store a reference to the object so you cannot shoot your foot like this. The equivalent C# code would (roughly) look like this:

StreamWriter $temp = new StreamWriter(logFile);
logger = $temp;
try {
   // etc...
   logger = null;
}
finally {
   if ($temp != null) $temp.Dispose();
}

That extra $temp variable keeps you out of trouble.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 Great answer. Thanks for explaining why it works this way! –  Jonathan Hobbs May 7 '13 at 23:56
    
Thanks! Does it really grab my IDisposable reference before assigning it to my variable? (Just a side question) –  J Bryan Price May 8 '13 at 0:24
    
Yes, it really does. Don't hesitate to play with ildasm.exe –  Hans Passant May 8 '13 at 0:32
    
Interesting: I'm looking at the ILSpy decompile and it appears to set logger first, then the hidden local variable. I'd expect that, since my using may have more a complicated IDisposable-generating expression. But thanks for pointing me at looking at the IL code. –  J Bryan Price May 8 '13 at 16:52
    
And for the record, I'm more than capable of shooting myself in the foot. Just not this way, apparently :) –  J Bryan Price May 8 '13 at 16:55

My question is, what happens when I set my variable to null inside a using block? Will it still get disposed properly?

That depends on where your variable's declared. It will either be disposed of correctly, or your code won't compile in the first place.

If your variable is declared outside the using statement: Yes

A a;
using (a = new A())
{
    a = null;
}

Yes, it will be disposed properly. For a simple test:

A variable is nulled within a using block and disposed of successfully
My text colour scheme is Ragnarok Grey.

Even with the assignment cleared, a reference to the new A() seems to have been maintained. a is disposed of at the end of the using statement as expected, even if it's nulled inside.

In some versions of Visual Studio, this may result in Compiler Warning (level 2) CS0728:

Possibly incorrect assignment to local 'a' which is the argument to a using or lock statement. The Dispose call or unlocking will happen on the original value of the local.

If your variable declared within the using statement: N/A

using (var a = new A())
{
    a = null;
}

The above code won't compile. You're not permitted to assign to a using variable in the first place. The above code produces this compile error:

Cannot assign to 'a' because it is a 'using variable'

This is Compiler Error CS1656.

This error occurs when an assignment to variable occurs in a read-only context. Read-only contexts include foreach iteration variables, using variables, and fixed variables. To resolve this error, avoid assignments to a statement variable in using blocks, foreach statements, and fixed statements.

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1  
Good answer. These compiler writers... they're a clever bunch! –  spender May 7 '13 at 23:31
    
But the Op declares logger before the using statement. His code will compile with just a warning. –  Henk Holterman May 7 '13 at 23:37
    
@Henk Edited. Thanks for pointing this out. I didn't notice that, wow. The two have very different results. –  Jonathan Hobbs May 7 '13 at 23:44
    
You may want to include the warning as well, it holds the clue to why it still works. –  Henk Holterman May 7 '13 at 23:51
    
@Henk The first example actually produces no warnings for me at all in VS2012 and VS2010! (If you're getting a compiler warning, that is actually concerning. Why am I not seeing one?) –  Jonathan Hobbs May 7 '13 at 23:53

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