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I have a struct for an A* algorithm, which is defined by:

typedef struct matriz{
    int g,h,f;
    bool isBarrier, isStart, isEnd;
}matrix;

I have made an Matrix out of this structure, and made all the initial values 0.

matrix n[8][8];

And then I've made an algorithm to calculate the distance between the start position to the current position.

For that purpose I have used an recursive method as the steps would be the amount of steps it took to get to that position, which will increase every time it goes to calculate another position:

bool checkbounds(int x, int y){
    if(x>=0 && x<=totalsize-1){
        if(y>=0 && y<=totalsize-1) return true;
    }
    return false;
}

bool isGNull(int x, int y){
    if(n[x][y].g==0)return true;
    return false;
}

void countg(int x, int y, int steps){
    if(checkbounds(x-1,y)){
        if(isGNull(x-1,y)){
            n[x-1][y].g=steps;
            countg(x-1,y,steps+1);
        }
    }
    if(checkbounds(x,y-1)){
        if(isGNull(x,y-1)){
            n[x][y-1].g=steps;
            countg(x,y-1,steps+1);
        }
    }
    if(checkbounds(x+1,y)){
        if(isGNull(x+1,y)){
            n[x+1][y].g=steps;
            countg(x+1,y,steps+1);
        }
    }
    if(checkbounds(x,y+1)){
        if(isGNull(x,y+1)){
            n[x][y+1].g=steps;
            countg(x,y+1,steps+1);
        }
    }
}

The problem is that it was supposed to return to the initial steps value when getting back of the recursion.

The expected result was supposed to be like:

| 5  4  3  2  3  4  5  6 |
| 4  3  2  1  2  3  4  5 |
| 3  2  1  S  1  2  E  6 |
| 4  3  2  1  2  3  4  5 |
| 5  4  3  2  3  4  5  6 |
| 6  5  4  3  4  5  6  7 |
| 7  6  5  4  5  6  7  8 |
| 8  7  6  5  6  7  8  9 |

Where S is the start position and E is the end position.

but what I get is:

| 5  4  3  2 35 36 53 54 |
| 6 19 20  1 34 37 52 55 |
| 7 18 21  S 33 38  E 56 |
| 8 17 22 31 40 39 50 57 |
| 9 16 23 30 41 48 49 58 |
|10 15 24 29 42 47 60 59 |
|11 14 25 28 43 46 61 64 |
|12 13 26 27 44 45 62 63 |

Is probably some logic error, but I'm having some trouble to find it, can someone help me?

--EDIT-- The user Elazar made an certain improvement to the size of the algorithm, but still gives the same result as before.

bool checkbounds(int x, int y) {
    return 0 <= x && x < totalsize
        && 0 <= y && y < totalsize;
}

void countg(int _x, int _y, int steps) {
    static int d[] = {-1, 0, 1, 0};
    for (int i = 0; i < 4; i++) {
        int x = _x+d[i], y = _y+d[3-i];
        if (checkbounds(x,y) && n[x][y].g==0) {
            n[x][y].g=steps;
            countg(x,y,steps+1);
        }
    }
}

Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
    
my suggestion is only a syntactic improvement, but identical otherwise. no wonder it doesn't work. –  Elazar May 8 '13 at 1:50
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3 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You're doing a depth first instead of breadth first search (notice that it takes one looong path from 1 to 64, then never tries anything else) recursive search. Meaning that you're travelling all the way down the first path, trying every single cell, then after that's done you try the next direction from the cell one up, then the cell one up, the cell one up... the starting cell, and each time you find no other place to go.

This is not well suited for being coded recursively, IMO. Instead, you should keep a data structure of all cells that you have not checked the neighbours of yet (call it the open set, in A* terminology) and continually

1) check to see if anything is in the open set (else you're done)

2) else pick the best candidate for the best path (lowest cost so far + lowest admissive heuristic if using one) and check all of its neighbours - every path you make from it or improve, add to the open set

share|improve this answer
    
Sure! thanks for the tip, for the number 1 it is missing the condition to check if its the Start or if its End or even a Barrier, I should also implement that, I thought recursive would be way better because the data structure i would have to make would be going to be quite large and varying on the totalsize of my matrix –  Guilherme Garcia da Rosa May 8 '13 at 1:43
    
@Guilherme Garcia da Rosa Some algorithms are naturally expressed as recursive, some algorithms are naturally expressed as iterative. A* is naturally iterative as any pseudocode for it shows, since it doesn't have any blind, trivial strategy for how it goes down paths - it needs to re-evaluate after every step what is now the best path. –  Patashu May 8 '13 at 21:06
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Your recursive algorithm will wander up, then left, then down, then right, labeling the distance it's traveled so far. Look again at the numbers and you can see the route it took.

| 5 <4 <3 <2 35 36 53 54 |
  v        ^
| 6 19>20  1 34 37 52 55 |
  v  ^  v  ^
| 7 18 21  S 33 38  E 56 |
  v  ^  v
| 8 17 22 31 40 39 50 57 |
  v  ^  v
| 9 16 23 30 41 48 49 58 |
  v  ^  v
|10 15 24 29 42 47 60 59 |
  v  ^  v
|11 14 25 28 43 46 61 64 |
  v  ^  v
|12>13 26>27 44 45 62 63 |

Then, when it finally reaches the bottom right, it unwinds the stack and doesn't keep going because everything has a number. This is called a depth first search.

The easiest change would be to alter your algorithm to actually work would be to check if the current steps is shorter than the previous steps, instead of if the previous steps was "null". But in the words of patashu, "it would be horrendously inefficient".

This algorithm isn't even remotely close to an A*, and it's hard to see how it could be turned into one. A* is a breadth first search, and requires you to perform several paths in an interleaved manner. I very much recommend starting over from scratch.

share|improve this answer
    
+1 beat me to to it and nice explanation –  Shafik Yaghmour May 8 '13 at 1:26
    
@Mooing Duck: "The easiest change would be to alter your algorithm to check if the current steps is shorter than the previous steps, instead of if the previous steps was "null"." While it WOULD solve the idea, it would be horrendously inefficient, and not how any sane A* is designed. A* is greedy at every iteration, constantly switching to which path ending currently looks the most promising - 'depth first' and 'A*' do not belong in the same sentence, basically. –  Patashu May 8 '13 at 1:28
    
Hehe, thank you for your awnser I'm actually starting to understand A*, this is just some crazy idea that I had which could result into an "pathfinding" –  Guilherme Garcia da Rosa May 8 '13 at 1:29
2  
@Guilherme Garcia da Rosa To implement A*, my advice would be to follow the pseudocode on the wikipedia page for A* exactly: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/A*_search_algorithm It is actually rather difficult to translate it into real code, since it uses lots of implied data structures like priority queues, sets, hashmaps and so on, but if you aren't following it you're probably coding something that is not A*. Once you grok A* however you keep the knowledge with you forever, it's just that awesome and intuitive an algorithm. –  Patashu May 8 '13 at 1:31
1  
@Mooing Duck If the code requires a top-down rewrite, recommend a top-down rewrite. Don't skirt around the issue. –  Patashu May 8 '13 at 1:31
show 2 more comments

Not an answer, but it stings my eyes:

bool checkbounds(int x, int y) {
    return 0 <= x && x < totalsize
        && 0 <= y && y < totalsize;
}

void countg(int _x, int _y, int steps) {
    static int d[] = {-1, 0, 1, 0};
    for (int i = 0; i < 4; i++) {
        int x = _x+d[i], y = _y+d[3-i];
        if (checkbounds(x,y) && n[x][y].g==0) {
            n[x][y].g=steps;
            countg(x,y,steps+1);
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks its indeed a improvement code! I was thinking a way to reduce the code but was failing haha, thank you for saving work :) –  Guilherme Garcia da Rosa May 8 '13 at 1:32
    
int x = _x+d[i], y = _y+d[3-i]; That's... marvelous and horrifying. –  Mooing Duck May 8 '13 at 1:34
    
@MooingDuck - yes it's ugly. :-/. You are welcome to fix it if you feel like it. –  Elazar May 8 '13 at 1:35
    
This new countg (the one you have removed after editing) with [ int x = _x+d[i%4], y = _y+d[3-(i%4)]; ]gave me the start correctly! around my Start position it resulted in 1 to each direction! but everything else was a zero, i'm leaving the full code so you can test for yourself the resulting matrix: pastie.org/7816132 –  Guilherme Garcia da Rosa May 8 '13 at 1:47
2  
no, it won't work recursively, as has been said here, because recursion means a stack which mean DFS, and you need a queue to implement BFS. –  Elazar May 8 '13 at 1:58
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