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I was trying to make a simple Ideal Gases calculator but for some reason I cannot seem to get any of my if statements to return any values.

def Ideal():
    p = input("Pressure:")
    v = input("Volume:")
    n = input("Moles:")
    t = input("Temperature in K:")
    r = 8.31

    if p is None:
        y =(n*r*t)/v
        return y
    elif v is None:
        return(n*r*t)/p
    elif n is None:
        return (p*v)/(r*t)
    elif n is None:
        return (p*v)/(n*r)

I went from the above code to this

def input_float(prompt):
result = input(prompt)
if result:
    return float(result)
else:
    return None

def Ideal():
p = input_float("Pressure:")
v = input_float("Volume:")
n = input_float("Moles:")
t = input_float("Temperature in K:")
r = 8.31

if p is None:
    y =(n*r*t)/v
    print(y)
elif v is None:
    u = (n*r*t)/p
    print(u)
elif n is None:
    i = (p*v)/(r*t)
    print(i)
elif t is None:
    o = (p*v)/(n*r)
    print(o)
else:
    print("This should never happen")

Ideal()

and now it works great. But I am guessing there was an easier way to go about this and since I am here to learn I would love to here opinions.

share|improve this question
    
Python is pick about indentation, you may want to look into that. –  paxdiablo May 8 '13 at 5:14
    
if statements aren't functions, so they're not designed to "return" anything; I believe what you mean is that your if statements never evaluate as True. (The reason for this is explained in icktoofay's answer.) –  Kyle Strand May 8 '13 at 5:17
    
Its generally good practice to avoid having an if/elif chain without putting an else at the end, even if one of the if conditions should always be true. What you do in the else block may depend on the details of your code (raising an exception is sometimes appropriate). At a minimum, do something like print("This should never happen") so you can see if something unexpected is going on (as it is, in the current situation). –  Blckknght May 8 '13 at 5:19
    
You have two tests for the same condition: elif n is None:, you may want to see if that was intentional. –  Irwin May 8 '13 at 5:54

1 Answer 1

input gives you a string. If the user provides no input, you don't get None — you get an empty string. You might want to make a new function to take input from the user but return None if they enter nothing and parse it otherwise:

def input_float(prompt):
    result = input(prompt)
    if result:
        return float(result)
    else:
        return None

Then you can replace the inputs in your program with input_floats.

share|improve this answer
    
… or return float(result) if result else None. –  EOL May 8 '13 at 5:29
    
If you simply press "enter" past the input prompt, I get an exception rather than no input. Can you clarify? –  Irwin May 8 '13 at 5:53
1  
@Irwin: I suspect you're using Python 2; the question and my answer relate to Python 3. Python 3's input is Python 2's raw_input; Python 2's raw_input is Python 3's eval(input(...)). –  icktoofay May 8 '13 at 6:13
    
Thank you for clarifying this for me @icktoofay –  Irwin May 8 '13 at 15:34

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