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I have some understanding issues with following code segment and the output. Can anybody provide an explanation mainly why test() works the way as seen in output. I am using MSCV 2008 C++ Compiler.

class AS
{
    int a;

public:
    AS():a(1){show();}
    virtual void show() {cout<<a<<endl;}
    void test() { cout<<"Calling show()"<<endl; this->show();}
};

class BS: virtual public AS
{
    int b;
public:
    BS():b(2){show();}
    virtual void show() {cout<<b<<endl;}
    void test() { cout<<"Calling show()"<<endl; this->show();}
};

class CS:public virtual  AS
{
    int c;
public:
    CS():c(3){show();}
    virtual void show() {cout<<c<<endl;}
    void test() { cout<<"Calling show()"<<endl; this->show();}
};

class DS:BS, public CS
{
    int d;
public:
DS():d(4){show();}
    virtual void show() {cout<<d<<endl;}
    void test() { cout<<"Calling show()"<<endl; this->show();}
};

int main()
{
cout<<"Class Sizes:"<<endl;
cout<<sizeof(AS)<<endl;
cout<<sizeof(BS)<<endl;
cout<<sizeof(CS)<<endl;
cout<<sizeof(DS)<<endl;

AS* aa = new DS();  
aa->test();
aa->show();

delete aa;

return 0;
}

Output is:-

Class Sizes:
8
20
20
32
1
2
3
4
Calling show()
4
4

and an breakpoint exception on deleting aa; Why ?

share|improve this question
    
Never call virtual methods from ctor/dtor because construction/destuction is in progress. –  Slava Zhuyko May 8 '13 at 5:46
    
@SlavaZhuyko: Not true! Feel free to call virtual functions in ctor/dtor but be sure you know how dynamic dispatch works in ctor/dtor. –  Alok Save May 8 '13 at 5:48

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Here is my bit, pls correct me if I'm wrong.

[Note: vptr-vtable mechanism is used to implement virtual function calls and vbptr (virtual base class pointer) is used to implement virtual base class. Also, the sizeOf(of some polymorphic class) may vary based on compiler + platform being used]

1) An instance of class AS would need 8 bytes (4 bytes for "int a" + 4 bytes for hidden vptr) = 8

2) An instance of class BS would need 20 bytes

(4 bytes to hold base class AS + 4 bytes padding + 4 bytes for "int b" + 4 bytes for hidden vptr + 4 bytes for vbptr) = 20

3) An instance of class CS would need 20 bytes

(4 bytes to hold base class AS + 4 bytes padding + 4 bytes for "int c" + 4 bytes for hidden vptr + 4 bytes for vbptr) = 20

4) An instance of class DS would need 32 bytes

(4 bytes to hold shared base class AS + 4 bytes for "int d" + 8 bytes to hold base class BS (accounting for member size + vbptr size)+ 8 bytes to hold base class CS (accounting for member size + vbptr size) + 4 bytes for hidden DS::vptr + 4 bytes for DS::vbptr) = 32

[Pls note, while implementing vptr-vtable mechanism, the compiler augments vtable with virtual function addresses, there exists a single v-table and a single v-ptr inside the memory model of class DS. Whereas, vbptr would be duplicated inside every virtual base class and inside classes inheriting from them].

Again, all these are compiler specific implementation and may vary across compilers.

Also, define all base class destructors as virtual to get rid of crash.

share|improve this answer
    
But, could you explain why in DS when calculating its total size, vptr for AS is included in size but not vptr of BS or CS ? –  aiw33k May 9 '13 at 6:14
    
vptr for AS will not get included, sorry it was my mistake. Corrected it. Pls read step-4 marked in bold again. –  Arun May 9 '13 at 6:45
    
This is good stuff. I am a bit greedy now and would ask if you have any idea of memory layout of all objects created with vtbl calls. –  aiw33k May 9 '13 at 8:39
    
Even though you marked it as an accepted answer, just corrected step2 and step3. Have a look at openrce.org/articles/full_view/23 for a discussion on layouts. Would recommend reading "Inside C++ Object Model". –  Arun May 13 '13 at 5:09

Whenever you call delete on a base class pointer pointing to a derived class object then it is mandatory that base class should have a virtual destructor. Failing to do so results in Undefined Behavior.

So, Your class AS needs to provide a virtual destructor:

class AS
{
    public:
        virtual ~AS(){}
};

Your confusion seems to be output of virtual functions called through constructor & destructors.

The type of this within constructor and destructor is the type of the class who's constructor/destructor is being called. So any virtual function calls from constructor and destructor do not show the dynamic dispatch behavior that you normally expect for virtual functions. Instead the function for that particular class gets called.


As for the sizes class objects. You should not assume the sizes to be anything specific. The compilers are free to add padding bytes which may increase the size of even a non polymorphic class. As for polymorphic classes typically most implementations will add a virtual pointer to the class object to implement the dynamic dispatch mechanism thereby increasing the object size. Note that this is completely implementation dependent.
So always just get the size using sizeof and never rely on it to be anything specific.

share|improve this answer
1  
For clarity, when you say 'the type of this', more importantly ( or perhaps just more accurately as I think this is what you meant?) it is the dynamic type of *this which is also of the type of the class whose constructor or destructor is currently being executed. –  Charles Bailey May 8 '13 at 5:51
    
@CharlesBailey: True, thank you for that corrective note, it certainly adds more clarity. –  Alok Save May 8 '13 at 6:03

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