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I have a custom container that I have been using for many years without issues. Recently I found out that if I define iterators for my container, I can effectively use all of the algorithms defined in <algorithm>. Not only that, it seems that thrust library (basically think CUDA version of STL for Nvidia GPUs) heavily uses iterators and I am hoping that by using them I'll be able to use that library as well.

Anyway, since this is my first try at writing my own iterators, I thought I post what I have here to ask for further assistance and make sure what I'm doing is right. So, I wrote a little array class that supports both iterator and const_iterator classes. I ran my class with a bunch of different STL algorithms and all seem to work fine but that does not necessarily mean I've got everything right! In particular, is there any operator that I miss for my iterators? Have I defined extra unnecessary ones? Also, since most of iterator and const_iterator look similar, is there a way to prevent duplication?

I'm open to suggestions and improvements :)

Live example: http://ideone.com/7YdiQY

#include <cstddef>
#include <iostream>
#include <iterator>
#include <algorithm>

template<typename T>
class my_array{
    T* data_;
    std::size_t size_;

public:

    // ---------------------------------
    // Forward declaration
    // ---------------------------------
    class const_iterator;

    // ---------------------------------
    // iterator class
    // ---------------------------------
    class iterator: public std::iterator<std::random_access_iterator_tag, T>
    {
    public:
        iterator(): p_(NULL) {}
        iterator(T* p): p_(p) {}
        iterator(const iterator& other): p_(other.p_) {}
        const iterator& operator=(const iterator& other) {p_ = other.p_; return other;}

        iterator& operator++()    {p_++; return *this;} // prefix++
        iterator  operator++(int) {iterator tmp(*this); ++(*this); return tmp;} // postfix++
        iterator& operator--()    {p_--; return *this;} // prefix--
        iterator  operator--(int) {iterator tmp(*this); --(*this); return tmp;} // postfix--

        void     operator+=(const std::size_t& n)  {p_ += n;}
        void     operator+=(const iterator& other) {p_ += other.p_;}
        iterator operator+ (const std::size_t& n)  {iterator tmp(*this); tmp += n; return tmp;}
        iterator operator+ (const iterator& other) {iterator tmp(*this); tmp += other; return tmp;}

        void        operator-=(const std::size_t& n)  {p_ -= n;}
        void        operator-=(const iterator& other) {p_ -= other.p_;}
        iterator    operator- (const std::size_t& n)  {iterator tmp(*this); tmp -= n; return tmp;}
        std::size_t operator- (const iterator& other) {return p_ - other.p_;}

        bool operator< (const iterator& other) {return (p_-other.p_)< 0;}
        bool operator<=(const iterator& other) {return (p_-other.p_)<=0;}
        bool operator> (const iterator& other) {return (p_-other.p_)> 0;}
        bool operator>=(const iterator& other) {return (p_-other.p_)>=0;}
        bool operator==(const iterator& other) {return  p_ == other.p_; }
        bool operator!=(const iterator& other) {return  p_ != other.p_; }

        T& operator[](const int& n) {return *(p_+n);}
        T& operator*() {return *p_;}
        T* operator->(){return  p_;}

    private:
        T* p_;

        friend class const_iterator;
    };

    // ---------------------------------
    // const_iterator class
    // ---------------------------------
    class const_iterator: public std::iterator<std::random_access_iterator_tag, T>
    {
    public:
        const_iterator(): p_(NULL) {}
        const_iterator(const T* p): p_(p) {}
        const_iterator(const iterator& other): p_(other.p_) {}
        const_iterator(const const_iterator& other): p_(other.p_) {}
        const const_iterator& operator=(const const_iterator& other) {p_ = other.p_; return other;}
        const const_iterator& operator=(const iterator& other) {p_ = other.p_; return other;}

        const_iterator& operator++()    {p_++; return *this;} // prefix++
        const_iterator  operator++(int) {const_iterator tmp(*this); ++(*this); return tmp;} // postfix++
        const_iterator& operator--()    {p_--; return *this;} // prefix--
        const_iterator  operator--(int) {const_iterator tmp(*this); --(*this); return tmp;} // postfix--

        void           operator+=(const std::size_t& n)              {p_ += n;}
        void           operator+=(const const_iterator& other)       {p_ += other.p_;}
        const_iterator operator+ (const std::size_t& n)        const {const_iterator tmp(*this); tmp += n; return tmp;}
        const_iterator operator+ (const const_iterator& other) const {const_iterator tmp(*this); tmp += other; return tmp;}

        void           operator-=(const std::size_t& n)              {p_ -= n;}
        void           operator-=(const const_iterator& other)       {p_ -= other.p_;}
        const_iterator operator- (const std::size_t& n)        const {const_iterator tmp(*this); tmp -= n; return tmp;}
        std::size_t    operator- (const const_iterator& other) const {return p_ - other.p_;}

        bool operator< (const const_iterator& other) const {return (p_-other.p_)< 0;}
        bool operator<=(const const_iterator& other) const {return (p_-other.p_)<=0;}
        bool operator> (const const_iterator& other) const {return (p_-other.p_)> 0;}
        bool operator>=(const const_iterator& other) const {return (p_-other.p_)>=0;}
        bool operator==(const const_iterator& other) const {return  p_ == other.p_; }
        bool operator!=(const const_iterator& other) const {return  p_ != other.p_; }

        const T& operator[](const int& n) const {return *(p_+n);}
        const T& operator*()  const {return *p_;}
        const T* operator->() const {return  p_;}

    private:
        const T* p_;
    };

    my_array()
        : data_(NULL), size_(0)
    {}
    my_array(std::size_t size)
        : data_(new T[size]), size_(size)
    {}
    my_array(const my_array<T>& other){
        size_ = other.size_;
        data_ = new T[size_];
        for (std::size_t i = 0; i<size_; i++)
            data_[i] = other.data_[i];
    }
    my_array(const const_iterator& first, const const_iterator& last){
        size_ = last - first;
        data_ = new T[size_];

        for (std::size_t i = 0; i<size_; i++)
            data_[i] = first[i];
    }

    ~my_array(){
        delete [] data_;
    }
    const my_array<T>& operator=(const my_array<T>& other){
        size_ = other.size_;
        data_ = new T[size_];
        for (std::size_t i = 0; i<size_; i++)
            data_[i] = other.data_[i];
        return other;
    }
    const T& operator[](std::size_t idx) const {return data_[idx];}
    T& operator[](std::size_t& idx) {return data_[idx];}
    std::size_t size(){return size_;}

    iterator begin(){ return iterator(data_); }
    iterator end()  { return iterator(data_+size_); }
    const_iterator begin() const{ return const_iterator(data_); }
    const_iterator end() const  { return const_iterator(data_+size_);}
};

template<typename T>
void print(T t) {
    std::cout << t << std::endl;
}

int main(){

    // works!
    int list [] = {1, 3, 5, 2, 4, 3, 5, 10, 10};
    my_array<int> a(list, list+sizeof(list)/sizeof(int));

    // works!
    for (my_array<int>::const_iterator it = a.begin(), end = a.end();
         it != end; ++it)
        std::cout << ' ' << *it;
    std::cout << std::endl;

    // works!
    std::for_each(a.begin(), a.end(), print<int>);
    std::cout << std::endl;

    // works!
    my_array<int> b(a.size());
    std::copy(a.begin(), a.end(), b.begin());

    // works!
    my_array<int>::iterator end = std::remove(a.begin(), a.end(), 5);
    std::for_each(a.begin(), end, print<int>);
    std::cout << std::endl;

    // works!
    std::random_shuffle(a.begin(), end);
    std::for_each(a.begin(), end, print<int>);
    std::cout << std::endl;

    // works!
    std::cout << "Counts of 3 in array = " << std::count(a.begin(), end, 3) << std::endl << std::endl;

    // works!
    std::sort(a.begin(), end);
    std::for_each(a.begin(), end, print<int>);
    std::cout << std::endl;

    // works!
    if (!std::binary_search(a.begin(), a.end(), 5))
        std::cout << "Removed!" << std::endl;

    return 0;
}
share|improve this question

closed as off topic by PreferenceBean, Mark, sashoalm, ShadowScripter, Piskvor May 8 '13 at 12:11

Questions on Stack Overflow are expected to relate to programming within the scope defined by the community. Consider editing the question or leaving comments for improvement if you believe the question can be reworded to fit within the scope. Read more about reopening questions here.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

8  
I suspect you want codereview.stackexchange.com If you want a (more readable than The Standard) list of requirements for standard library compatible iterators, you could start here. – BoBTFish May 8 '13 at 7:10
    
@BoBTFish I can migrate if more people think the same way. I've seen people do that but I'm not sure how ... – GradGuy May 8 '13 at 7:13
    
You might like to consider adding cbegin and cend as well. – BoBTFish May 8 '13 at 7:19
    
@BoBTFish Thanks for the link. It is more useful than the usual one I find with google. – GradGuy May 8 '13 at 7:27
    
While I appreciate the effort and ideas behind this, I must agree with BoBTFish: This fits better over at codereview. The problem is that you don't have a (programming) problem and this question is not ultimately answerable here. – stefan May 8 '13 at 8:21

boost iterator provides a framework to create stl-compliant iterators and to adapt existing ones.

It allows you to focus on the functionality and generates all necessary traits, typedefs for you.

iterator and const_iterator creation without much code-duplication is supported as well.

share|improve this answer

The Boost iterator_adaptor can greatly simplify your code. The documentation has e.g. this example for a linked list iterator

template <class Value>
class node_iter
  : public boost::iterator_adaptor<
        node_iter<Value>                // Derived
      , Value*                          // Base
      , boost::use_default              // Value
      , boost::forward_traversal_tag    // CategoryOrTraversal
    >
{
 private:
    struct enabler {};  // a private type avoids misuse

 public:
    node_iter()
      : node_iter::iterator_adaptor_(0) {}

    explicit node_iter(Value* p)
      : node_iter::iterator_adaptor_(p) {}

    template <class OtherValue>
    node_iter(
        node_iter<OtherValue> const& other
      , typename boost::enable_if<
            boost::is_convertible<OtherValue*,Value*>
          , enabler
        >::type = enabler()
    )
      : node_iter::iterator_adaptor_(other.base()) {}

 private:
    friend class boost::iterator_core_access;
    void increment() { this->base_reference() = this->base()->next(); }
};

Note that the example only provides a default constructor, a constructor taking a node pointer, a generalized copy constructor that only accepts elements that can be converted to a node pointer, and an increment function. The increment function is an implementation detail that is shared by both operator++() and operator++(int).

All the other boiler-plate is automatically being generated by deriving from boost::iterator_adaptor. That includes all the nested typedef that you could also get from deriving from std::iterator, as well as all the overloaded operators (++, *, ->, ==, !=, advance) and anything else to make it a fully Standard conforming iterator.

By passing a Value const* and using a typedef you can define a const_iterator that reuses all your code with the appropriate modifications. Studying the example now will save you enormously down the road.

share|improve this answer

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