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I am mixing some code made in C++ into code made in C (generated by lex/yacc).

I have a pointer (void pointer to a C++ class) which is visible to the main and inside of parser() (the parsing function generated by yacc). This pointer is located in the .h of the parser as you can see below.

I want the object pointed by con have a global scope, actually, the pointer it have a global scope, I can access to the class in main as in parser function, but the object inside not. I mean, I can work and add data to it in parser but when it come back to main is empty, not destroy but empty. It look like the object inside parse is other as in main.

I want to have only one object in the entire project. How I do that?

Note: I will like to stay only one object, so I don't want to discuss about the copy constructor (that it works and has be tested), I just one object (something like singleton).

================================= main.cpp ========================================

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include "Context.h"
extern "C" {
    #include "parser.h"

}
int main(int argc, char** argv) {
    *stderr = *stdout;
    con = new_Context();
    yyin=fopen(argv[1],"rb");
         ret = yyparse();
    return  ret;
}

================================ parser.h ==========================================

#ifndef PARSER
#define PARSER

#include <stdio.h>
#include <stdlib.h>
#include "C_Context.h"



// ================ updated ========================
 #define LINKAGE extern
#ifdef __cplusplus
extern "C" {

#endif
LINKAGE C_Context *con;
#ifdef __cplusplus
}
#endif    
// ================ updated ========================



extern FILE* yyin;

int yyparse();

#endif

===================================== parser.c ======================================

// ================ updated ========================
#include "parser.h"
#ifdef __cplusplus
extern "C" {
#endif
C_Context *con;
#ifdef __cplusplus
}
#endif



// ================ updated ========================

#include "y.tab.c"

================================== C_Context.h (fragmrnt) =======================

typedef void C_Context;
typedef void C_TypeGroup;



#ifdef __cplusplus
extern "C" {

#endif

    // create a context and return the class as void pointer
    C_Context * new_Context();

#ifdef __cplusplus
}
#endif

=================================== C_Context.cpp (fragment) ===============

#include "Context.h"
#include <iostream>
#define con (*((Context *)c_con))

using namespace std;
extern "C" {

    C_Context * new_Context(){
        C_Context* ret =0x0;
        try{
            ret = (C_Context*)  new Context();
        }catch(char * ex){
            cerr<< "Runtime error:" << ex; 
        }
        return ret;
    }
}

UPDATE:

I update with the suggestions you had mad, still not work. Exactly the same problem. I am doing something wrong?

UPDATE 2:

Someone suggest me to describe the problem more. I am not sure what should I describe, but I will try.

I have a class name context that have all the objects an functions that need for implement a interpret. The object is a complex anidations of map/vectors with classes of map/vectors. All go well on parse, I mean, I can access all functionality of context class by it wrapper C_Context. My problem is that the language should first parse an initialization file and then the script, for that the object must context should stay with the data after the first initialization file to be able to correct run the script.

of course there is other way, I can make a temporal file, with all the script and the initialization file. But this limit or difficult the possibility of make some kind of include inside of the language. If I do it so, then I have to first read the file for includes and add all the files on one, to in the end run the real interpret. So I prefer to be able to run the parser many times if is possible. For that I need the context stay the same.

I don't know if this helps but well.

UPDATE 3

I apply that was suggested, as I understand it, still the same thing. Elements are added on the pointer inside parser(), I can play with it. But when I get back to main is empty again (no destroy).

(I check a little bit the grammar and the orthography)

share|improve this question

closed as too localized by unkulunkulu, sashoalm, Eli, Piskvor, Pete May 8 '13 at 12:20

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what exactly is the error or behavior you get? Make sure that you initiliaze the variable where appropriate. –  Devolus May 8 '13 at 8:22
    
I updated my solution. see if that helps. –  Devolus May 8 '13 at 8:38
add comment

2 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Declare the variable extern in the header and define it in the .c file. Otherwise each translation unit will have its own definition.

UPDATE:

Seeing you have updated your code, parser.c should look like this (just in case the compiler compiles .c files as C++):

// ================ updated ========================
#ifdef __cplusplus
extern "C" {
#endif
C_Context *con;
#ifdef __cplusplus
}
#endif


// ================ updated ========================

#include "y.tab.c"

And you can also remove extern "C" { ... around #include "parser.h" now.

share|improve this answer
    
The definition has to be extern "C" too if you declared it that way. –  Axel May 8 '13 at 7:39
    
I did what you suggest it compile, but it stil making the same thing. –  user1739342 May 8 '13 at 8:12
    
I tryied, still dose not work. And the extern should be there, becuase if not the linker do not find parser, even if you put the parser definition in the .h as extern (I don't know why). I can imagine is becuse the bizare way that the y.tab.c is made by yacc but that is not the problem :D. –  user1739342 May 8 '13 at 9:07
add comment

Either in the header like this:

#ifndef myinclude_h
#define myinclude_h

#ifdef MAIN
int x;
#else
extern int x;
#endif

#endif

In this case you must make sure that that somewhere in your compilation process MAIN is defined in exactly one file.

Or the other way as described above:

.h:

#ifndef myinclude_h
#define myinclude_h

extern int x;

#endif

.cpp:

int x;

To elaborate:

If you want to have a global vriable, you delcare it in some header file as above shown with extern. This is just a declartion which tells the compiler that there is "somewhere" a variable of type int with name x. The in one of your c or cpp files you actually declare the variable in the global space. Means, not inside a class or something, but outside of all functions. For example at the top of main you can write it before main comes:

int x;
main()
{
}

everwhere you want to make use of this variable you must include the headerfile where the extern declaration resides in and then you can access it, just like any other variable.

In the other files:

#include "myinclude.h"

void fkt()
{
   if(x < 10)
       x+= 10;
   cout << x << endl;
}

update

In your main:

 #include <stdio.h>
 #include <stdlib.h>
 #include "Context.h"

 #include "parser.h"

 int main(int argc, char** argv) {
     *stderr = *stdout;
     con = new_Context();
     yyin=fopen(argv[1],"rb");
     ret = yyparse();
     return  ret;
 }

in your parser.c

 #ifdef __cplusplus
 extern "C" {
 #endif

 C_Context *con;

 #ifdef __cplusplus
 }
 #endif

That should do it.

wherever your new_context() is:

 #include "parser.h"
share|improve this answer
    
I tend to downvote because your suggestion is so error prone. The answer of Axel is the only valid one. –  eckes May 8 '13 at 8:00
    
sorry, I fix the problem. Check the update please. The problems after the fix stay the same –  user1739342 May 8 '13 at 8:12
    
Maybe you should explain in more detail. Just to be sure, I put this exactly like this into my project and accessed x in various different files. No errors. So please elaborate where the problem is. I'm aware that the "C" declartion is a good idea, but not strictly neccessary unless you are dependent on it. –  Devolus May 8 '13 at 8:13
1  
at least you can improve by removing the redundancy: #define LINKAGE to be extern or empty and then define LINKAGE int x; in one line –  unkulunkulu May 8 '13 at 8:22
    
Yes, this is a good suggestion. –  Devolus May 8 '13 at 8:25
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