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I am using ComboBox in XAML:

 <ComboBox x:Name="Combobox1" ItemsSource="{Binding}" Margin="0,0,300,0"  
           Width="100" FontSize="30"   />

in code behind, I am setting its value to:

 protected override void OnNavigatedTo(NavigationEventArgs e)
 {
     Combobox1.DataContext = ComponentDataSource.ComponentCollection;
 }

Now I have a data source:

public class ComponentDataSource
{      
    private static ObservableCollection<ComponentGroup> _componentcollection;    

    public static ObservableCollection<ComponentGroup> ComponentCollection
    {
        get { return _componentcollection; }
    }


    public static async void CheckJson(object sender, object e)
    {
        var client = new HttpClient();
        client.MaxResponseContentBufferSize = 1024 * 1024;

        try
        {
            var response = await client.GetAsync(new Uri("URI"));
            response.EnsureSuccessStatusCode();
            var result = await response.Content.ReadAsStringAsync();
            var jobj = JObject.Parse(result);

            var list = jobj.Children()
                .Cast<JProperty>()
                .Select(p => new ComponentGroup()
                {
                    Name = p.Name,
                    Type = (string)p.Value["P1"],
                    Value = (string)p.Value["P2"]
                })
                .ToList();

            _componentcollection = new ObservableCollection<ComponentGroup>(list);
        }
        catch (HttpRequestException ex)
        {
        }
    }
}

For some reason, these items are not showing up in the ComboBox. All I get is an empty ComboBox.

Can anybody please help me out?

Edit 1: Hi, I know I am missing something simple but if anybody can please help me out I will highly appreciate it. BTW, if you want code let me know and I will upload it to skydrive.

share|improve this question
1  
hmm... everything is static in your VM. When you do the binding in XAML, you must set ItemsSource={Binding ComponentCollection} (The ObservableCollection) and on DataContext you need an instance of your class Component Data Source. But since it has static method, I'm not sure how well it will do the trick... –  Vasile Marian Falamas May 8 '13 at 9:05
    
@Vasile Marian Fălămaș,should i make any method instance method and not static ? –  raghu_3 May 8 '13 at 9:54
    
It is polite to mark the best/correct answer. –  Jerry Nixon - MSFT Jun 20 '13 at 15:31

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Vasile has it right in the comments. XAML in Windows 8 Apps can not bind to static properties. XAML can bind to standard properties like this:

public string Name { get; set; }

That (above) will bind with the equiv. of the {Binding Mode=OneTime}. That's because updates to raise events. At the same time you can use fully evented properties like this:

string m_Name = default(string);
public string Name { get { return m_Name; } set { SetProperty(ref m_Name, value); } }

That will bind in XAML, supporting whatever mode you specify (OneTime, OneWay, TwoWay). It follows the INotifyPropertyChanged pattern and is pretty basic.

I say all that to say this. Those two approaches are the only way to bind. You cannot bind to a field. You cannot bind to a method (yet). And you cannot bind to a static property. If you must bind to a static property, just expose your static property in a standard property in your view model.

To show you I am telling the truth, consider this XAML (almost like yours):

<ComboBox x:Name="MyCombo" ItemsSource="{Binding}" />

If you try this, it will bind fine:

protected override void OnNavigatedTo(NavigationEventArgs e)
{
    this.MyCombo.DataContext = new MyModel().Items;
    base.OnNavigatedTo(e);
}

public class MyModel
{
    public MyModel()
    {
        foreach (var item in Enumerable.Range(1, 50))
            Items.Add(item);
    }
    ObservableCollection<int> m_Items = new ObservableCollection<int>();
    public ObservableCollection<int> Items { get { return m_Items; } }
}

The only difference between the two is the static part. So even pushing the values the way you are trying will not work. It's because you are binding directly to a static property.

Here's a way to have static and expose it so it will bind:

protected override void OnNavigatedTo(NavigationEventArgs e)
{
    this.MyCombo.DataContext = new MyModel().Items;
    base.OnNavigatedTo(e);
}

public class MyModel
{
    public MyModel()
    {
        foreach (var item in Enumerable.Range(1, 50))
            s_Items.Add(item);
    }
    private static ObservableCollection<int> s_Items = new ObservableCollection<int>();
    public ObservableCollection<int> Items { get { return s_Items; } }
}

In the code above, I have the value static in the MyModel class, but I have a standard property exposing it. Because it is an ObservableColelction the property is already evented for binding, so this could be the complete implementation. So you get static and binding. Make sense?

Now to the embarrassing part.

The technique you are using to bind in your question should work. Binding a static property to the DataContext and then binding to it in ItemsSource works. @maad0 has demonstrated that it's a fine approach. So, why isn't it working for you.

I suppose all I can say is "It's not because you are binding wrong". <blush /> I was tempted to delete my answer, but I am leaving it only because the explanation of static binding might be valuable to developers who are attempting to do so.

Test your code with this

This is your CheckJson method. I have added a debugger statement to see if you are actually getting any results. Try using this sample in your app and seeing if it breaks. If it does not break, then the problem is not that you do not have data. The problem is somehow in your binding. Though it all looks fine to me.

public static async void CheckJson(object sender, object e)
{
    var client = new HttpClient();
    client.MaxResponseContentBufferSize = 1024 * 1024;

    try
    {
        var response = await client.GetAsync(new Uri("URI"));
        response.EnsureSuccessStatusCode();
        var result = await response.Content.ReadAsStringAsync();
        var jobj = JObject.Parse(result);

        var list = jobj.Children()
            .Cast<JProperty>()
            .Select(p => new ComponentGroup()
            {
                Name = p.Name,
                Type = (string)p.Value["P1"],
                Value = (string)p.Value["P2"]
            })
            .ToList();

        // add this code
        if (!_componentcollection.Any())
            System.Diagnostics.Debugger.Break();

        _componentcollection = new ObservableCollection<ComponentGroup>(list);
    }
    catch (HttpRequestException ex)
    {
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Except that he is not binding to a static property, he is binding to his DataContext. The fact that the value stored in the DataContext comes from a static property, is not the problem either. The problem is he is replacing this value every time he calls CheckJson but the binding engine is not aware of it. –  madd0 May 8 '13 at 15:56
1  
Binding to a static property or binding to a DataContext that references the same value as a static property is not the same thing. He is doing the latter and it works. I can send you a sample app that proves it if you like. –  madd0 May 8 '13 at 16:40
    
You are right. 100%. Thanks for taking the time to show me. My test project was inaccurate as to binding DataContext. To be clear, you can bind a static property to DataContext and then bind ItemsSource to DataContext. That works - though it requires code-behind to complete it. You cannot bind to a static property from XAML exclusively. I updated my answer to reflect this. –  Jerry Nixon - MSFT May 8 '13 at 22:04

There are a few things in your code that might result in an empty ComboBox:

  • Is your web service actually returning results? That exception that you are swallowing might hide the fact that you are actually working with an empty (or null) list. This is not your problem right now, but it might be.

  • Assuming your collection has elements and since you are using code behind, why don't you simply assign the ItemsSource property?

    protected override void OnNavigatedTo(NavigationEventArgs e)
    {
        Combobox1.ItemsSource = ComponentDataSource.ComponentCollection;
    }
    

    This will show your items if your collection is not empty.

Despite what others suggest, your binding is correct, since you are not binding to a static property. You are binding to an object, your DataContext and you set this to be the value of a static property. If your collection is not null and has values before you assign it to your combo box's DataContext, then the items will show.

What I assume is happening in your case, is that you are setting the DataContext either to a value of null or, in the best case, to an empty collection.

Your CheckJson method looks very much like the event handler for a DispatchTimer, so I am assuming that you are regularly downloading elements from the web to display them in your combo box. However, notice that each time you do so, you are replacing the collection that contains them with a new ObservableCollection!

To test my two assumptions, all you have to do is call CheckJson (and make sure it runs completely) before you assign the DataContext.

The easiest way to fix your problem, especially since your collection is static, is to store an ObservableCollection once in _componentcollection (for example, in the class's static constructor or by initializing it when it's declared) and then simply Add, Remove, or Clear items as necessary. Since your combo box will always listen to the same list, it will be notified when its contents change. You'd have:

private static ObservableCollection<ComponentGroup> _componentcollection = new ObservableCollection<ComponentGroup>();

And in CheckJson, you replace:

_componentcollection = new ObservableCollection<ComponentGroup>(list);

with:

_componentcollection.Clear();

foreach (var item in list)
{
    _componentcollection.Add(item);
}

PS. My suggestion, above, of using ItemsSource directly, will suffer from the exact same problem as the current code, it just takes the binding out of the picture and proves that the binding is not the problem. You would still have to be careful not to replace the list in your static code, for example, by using a single ObservableCollection as I suggest towards the end of my answer.

share|improve this answer
    
I concur that it is not his binding. Thanks for the note. –  Jerry Nixon - MSFT May 8 '13 at 22:09

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