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This is my very first time using jquery and I don't understand the following 'side-effect':

script.js:

$(function() {
  $("button").each(function() { 
    $t=$(this);                 
    $t.on("click", function() {
      console.log("Id: " + $t.attr('id'));
    });
  });
});

html:

...
<body>
  <button id="de">de</button>
  <button id="en">en</button>
</body>

When I click the "de" button and then the "en" button the log gives me:

en
en

It seems to be an effect of overwriting the listener function in the second call, is that right? How do I avoid this?

share|improve this question
    
The log gives you that when you do what? You've attached click handlers - what did you click? – Dominic Rodger May 8 '13 at 8:01
    
I clicked each of the the buttons. First "de" followed by "en"... – John Rumpel May 8 '13 at 8:03
    
This is a closure-related bug, but the code on display doesn't look like it has one. Are you 100% certain that the code you posted is identical to that which runs? – Jon May 8 '13 at 8:05
1  
@DudeSolutions: No it won't. Why would it? – Jon May 8 '13 at 8:06
1  
@JohnRumpel: Finished writing an explanation, hope that helps. – Jon May 8 '13 at 8:23
up vote 7 down vote accepted

After the update

In your updated question $t is a global variable. In JavaScript (usually) everything you declare without putting var in advance is a global variable bound to window (in the browser).

You can fix your code by changing $t = ... to var $t = ... which would declare $t in the handler


jQuery lets you attach click handlers to multiple buttons without using .each to iterate through them.

Your code is supposed to work , but might be problematic if you're invoking the handler in a way that might change this (note, you can close over this (or use bind) in the .each in your code to make sure you're getting the same this, you can also try logging $(this).attr('id') in the each)

Try:

$(function(){
  $("button").click(function() {                     
      console.log("Id: " + $(this).attr('id'));
  });
});

Here is a working fiddle

(Your original code works too by the way (fiddle))

In handlers jQuery returns the actual dom element which you wrap in $() to make a jQuery object again. You don't need to construct a jQuery object just to get the ID, $(this).attr('id') can be replaced with this.id .

share|improve this answer
    
You are absolutely right. I made a variable as suggested in my tutorial. But I didn't saw that there is any kind of impact there... – John Rumpel May 8 '13 at 8:10
    
@JohnRumpel I'm glad I could help, if this answer has resolved your issue please consider accepting it. – Benjamin Gruenbaum May 8 '13 at 8:12
    
@BenjaminGruenbaum: Unfortunately, the first part is incorrect: var $t won't fix it. – Jon May 8 '13 at 8:22
    
@Jon Sure it will, $t will be closed under the $.each ... that's how closures work. Here jsfiddle.net/WdFR3 – Benjamin Gruenbaum May 8 '13 at 9:13
    
@BenjaminGruenbaum: Wow. I think I mentally read .each as a plain loop. Dumb moment, sorry. – Jon May 8 '13 at 9:27

The problem: closure

Your code has a closure-related bug introduced by the presence of $t. What happens is that a click handler is installed on every button; all of those click handlers refer to the button as $t. This means that a reference to $t is taken when the handler is installed and evaluated when the handler is invoked.

It should be easy to see where this is going: when any handler is invoked the loop has already completed, so $t has the value of the last button iterated upon. In effect every button has a handler that operates as if the last button were clicked.

How to solve it

One way is to avoid creating a closure in the first place:

$(function() {
  $("button").each(function() { 
    $(this).on("click", function() {
      console.log("Id: " + $(this).attr('id'));
    });
  });
});

No $t, no problem. You could actually write this equivalently as

$(function() {
  $("button").on("click", function() {
    console.log("Id: " + $(this).attr('id'));
  });
});

Otherwise, you need to make sure that $t is a different $t on each loop iteration. The way to do that is by limiting the scope of $t to the loop body. Since JavaScript has function scope, the only way to do so is by introducing and calling a function on the spot:

$(function() {
  $("button").each(function() { 
    var $t=$(this);
    (function($u) {
      $u.on("click", function() {
        console.log("Id: " + $u.attr('id'));
      });
    })($t);
  });
});

In this version each handler is actually dependent on $u, which in turn is not shared among handlers. This solves the closure problem.

Note that I could have named the innermost function argument $t as well (in which case the name would have hidden the $t from the iteration scope); I chose not to do that only for clarity.

share|improve this answer
    
If you could fix the global ( $t )in your last code example, I'll gladly give you that +1 back :) – Benjamin Gruenbaum May 8 '13 at 8:19
1  
@BenjaminGruenbaum: Ah yes. Copy/pasting from the question, sorry. :-) – Jon May 8 '13 at 8:21

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