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I want to construct an object with a special behaviour and I'm pretty sure it can be done with python (with generator, or some kind of tricky class definition).

I basically want an object–let's call it– colourgun, which returns a colour from a list of predefined colours, each time I access it. So it should behave like a simple variable, but change it's behaviour each time it is accessed.

You can see a somewhat similar concept in the following example:

class CounterList(list):
    def __init__(self, *args):
        super(CounterList, self).__init__(*args)
        self.counter = 0
    def __getitem__(self, index):
        self.counter += 1
        return super(CounterList, self).__getitem__(index)

An instance of CounterList increases the counter each time the list is accessed, since __getitem__ is called.

My colourgun should be able to detect when it's "used" and behave something like this:

>>> gun = Colourgun() # or a function, a generator, whatever...
>>> print gun
'predefined_colour1'
>>> print gun
'predefined_colour2'
>>> print gun
'predefined_colour3'
>>> print gun # no more colours left: reloading and maybe warn the user
[WARNING] automatically reloading the gun
'predefined_colour1'
>>> gun.load(['colour1', 'colour2', 'colour3']) # some way to load it with colours
>>> print gun
'colour1'
>>> print gun
'colour2'
>>> gun.reload() # manually reloading
>>> print gun
'colour1'

The point is, I don't want to explicitly call the method for "shooting a colour" each time i access the variable. I guess this is a sign that the variable should indeed be a function or a generator (which can at least freeze its state).

I experimented a bit and this is one attempt to get closer to the idea, but it does not work, since I'm binding the return value of Shoot() and not the function itself to the variable gun:

class ColourGun(object) :
    def __init__(self) :
        self.colours = ['predefined_colour1', 'predefined_colour2', 'predefined_colour3']
        self.counter = 0
    def Shoot(self) :
        c = self.colours[self.counter]
        self.counter += 1
        return c

gun = ColorGun().Shoot()

print gun
print gun
print gun

Which of course prints out predefined_colour1 three times…

So there is surely a concept based on generators or a composition of classes and generators or something, which can do it in a pythonic way. (or maybe a design pattern?)

P.S.: Let me know if you have an idea for a better title and feel free to add more tags…

UPDATE

So doing it with properties (as wim suggested):

class ColorGun(object) :
    def __init__(self) :
        self.colours = ['predefined_colour1', 'predefined_colour2', 'predefined_colour3']
        self.counter = 0
    @property
    def Shoot(self) :
        if self.counter >= len(self.colours) :
            self.counter = 0
            print "automatically reloading"
        c = self.colours[self.counter]
        self.counter += 1
        return c

gun = ColorGun()

print gun.Shoot
print gun.Shoot
print gun.Shoot
print gun.Shoot

Which gives the output:

predefined_colour1
predefined_colour2
predefined_colour3
automatically reloading
predefined_colour1

Implementing a reload method is no problem, but can I somehow get rid of that ., so I can call it like gun instead of gun.Shoot? ;-)

share|improve this question
1  
You want to look at properties. – wim May 8 '13 at 9:51
    
Ah OK thanks, I think I got the idea… – tamasgal May 8 '13 at 9:55
    
How do you get rid of that .? gun = ColorGun().Shoot. – aychedee May 8 '13 at 10:27
    
See the accepted answer: you use the fact, that __str__ is called, whenever the variable is requested as a string. So you modify __str__ to return its property colour etc. – tamasgal May 9 '13 at 6:27
up vote 5 down vote accepted

Something like this...?

import itertools as it

class ColourGun(object):

    def __init__(self):
        self._colourgen = it.cycle(['predefined_colour1', 'predefined_colour2', 'predefined_colour3'])

    def load(self, colours):
        self._colourgen = it.cycle(colours)

    @property
    def colour(self):
        return next(self._colourgen)

    def __str__(self):
      return self.colour

gun = ColourGun()
print gun
print gun
print gun
gun.load(['potato', 'spam', 'eggs'])
print gun
print gun
share|improve this answer
1  
nice. don't mean to hijack the thread, but can you give examples when this kind of technique is useful? I understand property and ``__str__`. Not sure if this is answerable. Thanks – CppLearner May 8 '13 at 10:04
    
Thanks, that looks nice : ) – tamasgal May 8 '13 at 10:04
1  
@CppLearner I'm using this when I generate a bunch of plots and want to use my own colour spectrum. Now I can use gun or whatever name it has as a variable which changes the colour each time, so multiple lines in a single plot are printed with different colours. – tamasgal May 8 '13 at 10:06
2  
Properties are useful where you need something fancy to have on attribute getting, setting or deleting. A common usage example would be restricting an attribute so that it can only be set to a controlled group of inputs. – wim May 8 '13 at 10:07
    
This will only work when you call str on the object though... such as when printing. Not for the general case of access. – aychedee May 8 '13 at 10:29

Since your being used means print gun, let's just customize the __str__ method.

class ColorGun:

    def __init__(self):
        self.colors = ['red', 'pink']
        self.i = 0

    def __str__(self):
        if not self.colors:
            return

        if self.i >= len(self.colors):
            print '[WARNING] automatically reloading the gun.'
            self.reload()

        c = self.colors[self.i]
        self.i += 1

        return c

    def reload(self, colors=None):
        if colors:
            self.colors = colors
        self.i = 0

gun = ColorGun()
print gun
print gun
print gun
share|improve this answer

You may want to customize __str__ function to achieve that purpose. Here a simple example.

This example shows Items of mylist (you can have a generator instead) and when it got exhausted, it prints a default value.

class Gun():
    mylist=[1,2,3]
    index=-1
    default='Default'
    def __str__(self):
        try:
            self.index+=1
            return str(self.mylist[self.index])
        except IndexError:
            return self.default


>>> gun=Gun()
>>> print gun
1
>>> print gun
2
>>> print gun
3
>>> print gun
Default
>>> 
share|improve this answer

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