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First off, I know that in general having large numbers of wide columns is a bad idea, but this is the format I'm constrained to.

I have an application that imports CSV files into a staging table before manipulating them and inserting/updating values in the database. The staging table is created on the fly and has a variable number of NVARCHAR colums into which the file is imported, plus two INT columns used as row IDs.

One particular file I have to import is about 450 columns wide. With the 24 byte pointer used in a large NVARCHAR column, this adds up to around 10k by my calculations, and I get the error Cannot create a row of size 11166 which is greater than the allowable maximum row size of 8060.

Is there a way around this or are my only choices modifying the importer to split the import or removing columns from the file?

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Take a look at SSIS. microsoft.com/en-us/sqlserver/solutions-technologies/… It'll allow you to read in the CSV and filter and split off the rows to different target tables. –  flup May 8 '13 at 10:35
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No way. If you actually create a row of +8k even after off-row LOB eviction then you're out of luck. –  Remus Rusanu May 8 '13 at 10:58
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Create two or more tables and insert 450 cols splitted around this tables linked with keys. –  Max May 8 '13 at 13:09
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4 Answers

up vote 1 down vote accepted

If you are using SQL Server 2005, 2008 or 2012, you should be able to use NVARCHAR(max) or NTEXT which would be larger than 8,000 characters. MAX will give you 2^31 - 1 characters:

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms186939(v=sql.90).aspx

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I used a variant of this. The problem was that the amount of columns was too many and the 24 byte pointers were too numerous for the row limit. I imported as a single NVARCHAR(MAX) column then split this in the manipulation –  Jaloopa May 10 '13 at 9:42
    
NVARCHAR(max) or NTEXT can store the data more than 8kb but a record size can not be greater than 8kb till SQL Server 2012. If Data is not fitted in 8kb page size then the data of larger column is moved to another page and a 24 bytes(if data type is varchar/nvarchar) pointer is used to store as reference pointer in main column. if it is text/ntext data type then 16 bytes poiner is used. –  Banketeshvar Narayan Jan 11 at 14:31
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You can use text/ntext which uses 16 bytes pointer. Whereas varchar/nvarchar uses 24bytes pointer.

NVARCHAR(max) or NTEXT can store the data more than 8kb but a record size can not be greater than 8kb till SQL Server 2012. If Data is not fitted in 8kb page size then the data of larger column is moved to another page and a 24 bytes(if data type is varchar/nvarchar) pointer is used to store as reference pointer in main column. if it is text/ntext data type then 16 bytes poiner is used.

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Unless you are in SQL Server 2000 or earlier, you should never use text or ntext. –  HLGEM Jan 11 at 14:16
    
Yes, @HLGEM you are right. But if varchar/nvarchar doesn't solve the issue then in that worst case I have recommended to use text/ntext. As Varchar/Nvarchar uses 24 bytes pointer but text/ntext uses 16bytes pointer so you can store 1.5(24/16) times more data using text/ntext. So I have suggested it only for that worst case. I am also recommending that please avoid use of ntext/text in any other cases. –  Banketeshvar Narayan Jan 11 at 14:19
    
@Kaushik Sharma have also added some important info. stackoverflow.com/questions/14070932/… –  Banketeshvar Narayan Feb 21 at 15:13
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I agree that Varchar or nvarchar (Max) is a good solution and will probably work for you, but completeness I will suggest that you can also create more than one table with the two tables having a One-to-One relationship.

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