Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have a question regarding LINQ and the where statement. I have the following code sample (this is a simplified version of the code which I use in an application):

// Get the images from a datasource.
var images = GetImages(); // returns IEnumerable<Image>

// I continue processing images until everything has been processed.
while (images.Any())
{
    // I'm going to determine what kind of image it is and do some actions with it.
    var image = images.First();

    // Suddenly in my process I'm going to add a where statement to my images collection to fetch all images that matches the specified criteria.
    // It can happen (if my images collection is not empty) that the same where statement will be executed again to the images collection.
    // This is also where the problem is, somehow when I don't add the ToList() extension method, my linq statement is becoming slow, really slow.
    // When I add the ToList() extension method, why is my linq statement running fast again?
    var saveImages = images.Where(<criteria>); //.ToList() this is needed to make my LINQ query performant again.

    // I'm going to do something with these save images and then I'm going to remove these save images from the current images collection because I do not need to do these anymore by using the following statement.
    images = images.Except(saveImages);
}

As the code sample explains why is my LINQ statement becoming fast again when I add the ToList() extension method. Why can't I use the Where statement only because it returns an IEnumerable collection?

I'm really confused and I hope someone can explain it to me :).

share|improve this question
    
You are gradually making the images projection more and more complicated. I would just loop once... also: every time you iterate it, it might be iterating whatever GetImages composed... which could be significant work –  Marc Gravell May 8 '13 at 10:25
    
The ToList will simply be resolving the enumerable to a list. If multiple enumeration of the enumerable occurs, this could be a benefit if the enumerable itself has expensive iteration (such as a database query). What is the underlying enumerable from GetImages? –  Adam Houldsworth May 8 '13 at 10:25
    
You're doing something quite strange and seems to forget that LINQ use late bindings. –  Serge May 8 '13 at 10:26
    
@MarcGravell I'm quite sure that the GetImages method only returns the collection once, because the images are downloaded via a API. So everything is already in memory. In the GetImages method I prepare a new List of Images and going to add the downloaded images to it (with any additional data which I need in my process). Could you please explain to me why I make the images projection more and more complicated? –  Michiel Peeters May 8 '13 at 11:15
1  
@MichielPeeters iterating a sequence multiple times (rather than an array / list) is already "strange", in that it is not even guaranteed to work. Using while(Any) and First rather than foreach is strange. Adjusting that query lots of times with successively nested .Except / .Where is strange. You have multiple levels of strange here. –  Marc Gravell May 8 '13 at 11:18

2 Answers 2

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Perhaps it'll make more sense if we re-implement LINQ-to-Objects to show the methods; here's our Main:

static void Main()
{
    Log();
    IEnumerable<int> data = GetData();

    while (data.Any())
    {
        var value = data.First();
        Console.WriteLine("\t\tFound:{0}", value);
        var found = data.Where(i => i == value);
        data = data.Except(found);
    }
}
static IEnumerable<int> GetData()
{
    Log();
    return new[] { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 };
}

Looks innocent, yes? Now run it logging the output (LINQ methods shown at bottom) - we get:

Main
GetData
Any
First
                Found:1
Any
Except
Where
First
Except
Where
                Found:2
Any
Except
Where
Except
Where
Except
Where
First
Except
Where
Except
Where
Except
Where
                Found:3
Any
Except
Where
Except
Where
Except
Where
Except
Where
Except
Where
Except
Where
Except
Where
First
Except
Where
Except
Where
Except
Where
Except
Where
Except
Where
Except
Where
Except
Where
                Found:4
Any
Except
Where
Except
Where
Except
Where
Except
Where
Except
Where
Except
Where
Except
Where
Except
Where
Except
Where
Except
Where
Except
Where
Except
Where
Except
Where
Except
Where
Except
Where
First
Except
Where
Except
Where
Except
Where
Except
Where
Except
Where
Except
Where
Except
Where
Except
Where
Except
Where
Except
Where
Except
Where
Except
Where
Except
Where
Except
Where
Except
Where
                Found:5
Any
Except
Where
Except
Where
Except
Where
Except
Where
Except
Where
Except
Where
Except
Where
Except
Where
Except
Where
Except
Where
Except
Where
Except
Where
Except
Where
Except
Where
Except
Where
Except
Where
Except
Where
Except
Where
Except
Where
Except
Where
Except
Where
Except
Where
Except
Where
Except
Where
Except
Where
Except
Where
Except
Where
Except
Where
Except
Where
Except
Where
Except
Where

Notice how the complexity grows between each item?

For bonus points, make GetData an iterator block - see how many times GetData gets executed?

static IEnumerable<int> GetData()
{
    Log();
    yield return 1;
    yield return 2;
    yield return 3;
    yield return 4;
    yield return 5;
}

I make it 94 times (instead of once in the original version). Fun, huh?

This isn't the fault of LINQ - it is because you are using LINQ really oddly. For what you are doing it would be better to work on a flat collection (List<T>), adding and removing items as needed.

And here's the LINQ:

public static bool Any<T>(this IEnumerable<T> data)
{
    Log();
    using (var iter = data.GetEnumerator())
    {
        return iter.MoveNext();
    }
}
static void Log([CallerMemberName] string name = null)
{
    Console.WriteLine(name);
}
public static T First<T>(this IEnumerable<T> data)
{
    Log();
    using (var iter = data.GetEnumerator())
    {
        if (iter.MoveNext()) return iter.Current;
        throw new InvalidOperationException();
    }
}
public static IEnumerable<T> Where<T>(this IEnumerable<T> data, Func<T,bool> predicate)
{
    Log();
    foreach (var item in data) if (predicate(item)) yield return item;
}
public static IEnumerable<T> Except<T>(this IEnumerable<T> data, IEnumerable<T> except)
{
    Log();
    var exclude = new HashSet<T>(except);
    foreach (var item in data)
    {
        if (!exclude.Contains(item)) yield return item;
    }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 Wow, that's a great illustration of what's going on. Once you start scrolling down through the results, it becomes easy to see why running it is so slow. –  dasblinkenlight May 8 '13 at 11:36
1  
+1 Holy crap, I didn't expect that one! I need to rethink about many LINQ statements which I have used. –  Michiel Peeters May 8 '13 at 11:38
    
@MichielPeeters note the update(s) - the key point here is how you are using linq - it isn't a great idea to keep re-iterating and re-composing. Compose, sure - that is fine - but don't keep iterating it over and over while doing it. –  Marc Gravell May 8 '13 at 11:39
    
@MarcGravell You have made your point clear :) and I thought I was already using LINQ in the correct way but apperantly I didn't :). –  Michiel Peeters May 8 '13 at 11:45
    
@dasblinkenlight and that is just for 5 items; somewhere around item 50? 500? 5000? you'll start getting into massive times per item –  Marc Gravell May 8 '13 at 11:51

As you go through the loop, your images first becomes this

images.Except(firstSetOfExclusions)

then this

images.Except(firstSetOfExclusions).Except(secondSetOfExclusions)

then this

images.Except(firstSetOfExclusions).Except(secondSetOfExclusions).Except(thirdSetOfExclusions)

and so on. The slowness comes from the fact that unless you call ToList, each of the sets of exclusions must perform a new query. This gets slower and slower with each iteration of the loop, as it does essentially the same query over and over again. ToList fixes that by "materializing" the query in memory.

Note that another solution to this problem would be "materializing" the new subset of images, like this:

images = images.Except(saveImages).ToList();

This would avoid chaining the "except"s, so you wouldn't have to call ToList on saveImages.

share|improve this answer
    
Is there any possiblity to view what is actually happening in the LINQ statement? I've already viewed / debugged the collection only I'm unable to find where I can actually see the expression tree. –  Michiel Peeters May 8 '13 at 11:09
1  
@MichielPeeters I don't know if it's doable - I think a lot of it is private to classes implementing LINQ's extension methods and/or embedded into lambdas created locally inside the methods, making it very hard to find. –  dasblinkenlight May 8 '13 at 11:13
    
What a shame. If I could see the expression tree maybe then I'll understand more how LINQ actually processes the tree. I know stuff about LINQ but not enough seems to be ;-)... –  Michiel Peeters May 8 '13 at 11:21
2  
@MichielPeeters you can't see the expression-tree because this doesn't involve expression-trees. It has nothing to do with them at all. It is a series of iterator blocks. –  Marc Gravell May 8 '13 at 11:22
    
@MarcGravell As I have stated above, thank you for you explanation and has clarified alot of things for me :). –  Michiel Peeters May 8 '13 at 11:29

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.