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I have the following code:

#include <memory>

using namespace std;

template<typename U> class A;

template<typename U>
class B
{
    private:
        shared_ptr<const A<U>> _a;
    public:
        B (shared_ptr<const A<U>> __a) {
            _a = __a;
        }
};

template<typename U>
class A
{
    public:
        B<U> foo () const {
            return { make_shared<const A<U>> (this) };
        }
};

int
main ()
{
    A<int> a;
    B<int> b = a.foo ();

    return 0;
}

G++ 4.8.0 and Clang 3.3svn report that the class A hasn't a copy or move constructor. For example, G++ print the following message:

/home/alessio/Programmi/GCC/include/c++/4.8.0/ext/new_allocator.h:120:4: error: no      matching function for call to ‘A<int>::A(const A<int>* const)’
{ ::new((void *)__p) _Up(std::forward<_Args>(__args)...); }
  ^
/home/alessio/Programmi/GCC/include/c++/4.8.0/ext/new_allocator.h:120:4: note:  candidates are:
prova.cpp:19:7: note: constexpr A<int>::A()
 class A
       ^
prova.cpp:19:7: note:   candidate expects 0 arguments, 1 provided
prova.cpp:19:7: note: constexpr A<int>::A(const A<int>&)
prova.cpp:19:7: note:   no known conversion for argument 1 from ‘const A<int>* const’ to    ‘const A<int>&’
prova.cpp:19:7: note: constexpr A<int>::A(A<int>&&)
prova.cpp:19:7: note:   no known conversion for argument 1 from ‘const A<int>* const’ to  ‘A<int>&&’

What is the reason?

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A isn't a class. It's a template. –  Kerrek SB May 8 '13 at 12:48
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2 Answers

up vote 0 down vote accepted

According to the documentation, make_shared constructs a new instance of given type ant then wraps it into shared_ptr. You are trying to construct a new instance of A with type A*. It's shared_ptr's constructor that takes a pointer as an argument, not make_shared.

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But how make_shared constructs the new instance? You suppose that in A class there is a private field C c; if in A class there isn't any copy/move constructor, how it constructs the new instance? –  Alessio G. Baroni May 9 '13 at 6:41
    
make_shared calls a constructor of A class. The constructor is selected according to parameters of make_shared (of course, the object must be constructible in a specified way). If you want to create a shared_ptr pointing to an existing object with a private (forbidden) copy constructor, you should use shared_ptr's constructor directly, like shared_ptr<const A<U> >(this). Note that in your case you still have the default copy constructor for class A, so you may as well write make_shared<const A<U> >(*this) thus creating a copy. –  Inspired May 9 '13 at 9:56
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You need to say:

return { make_shared<const A<U>>(*this) };
//                              ^^^
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