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While debugging a compiler (mostly) written in C#, I noticed the following issue, which I tried to map to a simplified code fragment:

public class Program
{
    public abstract class Base
    {
        public abstract void foo();
    }

    public class A : Base
    {
        public override void foo()
        {
            Console.WriteLine("A");
        }
    }

    public class B : Base
    {
        public override void foo()
        {
            Console.WriteLine("B");
        }
    }

    public static void printOut(Base obj)
    {
        printOutImpl((dynamic)obj);
    }

    public static void printOutImpl(A aObj)
    {
        aObj.foo();
    }

    public static void printOutImpl(B bObj)
    {
        bObj.foo();
    }

    public static int Main(string[] args)
    {
        B bObj = new B();

        printOut(bObj);

        return 0;
    }
}

Basically, there are two implementations of printOut(..). The dynamic keyword is used to determine the corresponding implementation at runtime. When I'm debugging and try to step through the code, the debugger will not enter the corresponding printOutImpl(..) method unless there is a breakpoint set in the method body.

So my question is whether there is an option to disable/modify such behaviour. It's realy annoying to set (and remove) breakpoints to enforce the debugger to enter the method body.

Thanks! dinony

share|improve this question
    
Hm, strange...I can reproduce the issue in VS2010, but I found a workaround: while debugging just before executing printOutImpl((dynamic)obj);, if I say to Step Into Specific > System.Action`3.Invoke, it works. –  Tim S. May 8 '13 at 13:18
1  
In VS2012 all work fine. –  Vyacheslav Volkov May 8 '13 at 13:28
    
@Tim S: I tried it - For me the debugger jumps into disassembly: System.Dynamic.UpdateDelegates.UpdateAndExecuteVoid2. –  dinony May 8 '13 at 13:40
    
@Vyacheslav Volkov: installed VS2012, working indeed. Thanks for both replies! –  dinony May 8 '13 at 18:49

1 Answer 1

Use "step into"(F11) instead of "step over"(F10). I tested your code, and it correctly steps into printOutImpl(B bObj) and Console.WriteLine("B");

share|improve this answer
    
You're probably using Visual Studio 2012. In VS2010 "step into" does not work for me in that case. Also Tim S. could reproduce what I described. If your're really using VS2010 it would be cool to know your debug settings. –  dinony May 9 '13 at 13:21
    
Compare your settings with mine. I'm using VS2010 Ultimate, by the way. Go to "Tools" -> "Import and Export Settings" -> "Export selected environment settings", and then mark only the "Options\Debugging" box. Here are my settings: pastebin.com/S91HkBt1 –  GM Lucid May 9 '13 at 23:59

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