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Suppose I have

public IList<Entity> Children { get; set; }

public NotifyChildren(Func<object, bool> action, object data)
{
   foreach (var child in Children)
       if (action(data))
           /// <-- !!!! need action to work on child this time, not on the original target
           //child.NofifyChildren(action, data); <- this doesn't work because of the above requirement
           child.NotifyChildren(action.ChangeTargetTo(child), data); // << pseudocode!
}

public void SomeChangeOccured()
{
   var changedChild;
   NotifyChildren(x => x.SomeHandler(), "somedata");
}

How do I change the target of the action? I'm OK to pass a delegate instead of action but its .Target is read-only, too. Currently I think doing

public NotifyChildren(Expression<Func<Entity, bool>> action, object data)
{
     // so that I can do method.Invoke(newtarget, new object[]{data});
     NotifyChildren(((MethodCallExpression)action).Method, data);
}

that is, switch from action to reflected method call... but it's a bit ugly, isn't it?

I have a feeling that the solution is very simple and I used to know it... just forgot.

Hm, one solution would be to have static delegate that accepts Entity as first parameter, but I wouldn't want to go this way.

share|improve this question
    
Is your sample code located in the class named Entity ? –  Manitra Andriamitondra Oct 29 '09 at 15:02
    
Actually it is located in the Parent class but it doesn't matter. In this example I wrote it as if it is located in the Child class. –  queen3 Oct 29 '09 at 15:10
    
In fact, I think this makes your question ambigous : Is Entity a hierarchical object (with a self reference) or not ? And is your goal to recurcively notify child entities about a change that occured on your root entity ? Finally, what is the entry point of the process ? –  Manitra Andriamitondra Oct 29 '09 at 15:20

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

What you're specifically asking for isn't possible. A delegate represents a statically bound method, whereas you're looking for something dynamic. To do that specifically you need reflection.

However, your code appears to be structured in the correct way to accomplish what you want, but the code doesn't look like it's being called correctly.

You define action as Func<Entity, bool>, but you pass in data (which is an object) rather than child (which is an Entity). It seems like you should actually declare it as Func<Entity, object, bool> and do it like this:

public IList<Entity> Children { get; set; }

public NotifyChildren(Func<Entity, object, bool> action, object data)
{
   foreach (var child in Children)
   {
       if (action(child, data))
       {
           child.NofifyChildren(action, data); 
       }
   }
}

public void SomeChangeOccured()
{
     NotifyChildren((x, data) => x.SomeHandler(data), "somedata");
}

public bool SomeHandler(object data)
{
     return true; // obviously need more robust logic
}
share|improve this answer
1  
Actually it is possible with unbound delegates, but your solution seems better in this case. FWIW, you can also create the delegate straight from SomeHandler if you don't mind getting its MethodInfo with reflection. –  Anton Tykhyy Oct 29 '09 at 15:11
    
I've fixed the signature. What you provided wouldn't work, as action will still work on the original top-level Entity - I need it to be invoked on child. You do invoke action(child, data) but it is the "static delegate" method that I don't want to use (passing this as first method to static function). –  queen3 Oct 29 '09 at 15:12
    
@queen: As I said what you're asking for isn't possible, unless you go down the reflection road. Using this signature still allows for the "bubbling" approach that you're looking for. Given that the only actual method declaration is done in a lambda, I'm confused as to why you object. –  Adam Robinson Oct 29 '09 at 15:16
    
The method is not invoked on the child but you have the child as the first argument of the method. Isn't that acceptable ? –  Manitra Andriamitondra Oct 29 '09 at 15:21
    
It is because I'm ... a.... slightly tired I guess ;-) I knew it was that simple - I use lambdas all the time, but... I think it the end of the week coming. –  queen3 Oct 29 '09 at 15:24
foreach (var child in Children)
   if (action(data))
       /// <-- !!!! need action to work on child this time, not on the original target
       child.NofifyChildren(action, data);

WHY you call action in this loop? I think you can call it only once before foreach.

share|improve this answer
    
Because I need to ;-) action here is just a method name, say "HandleNameChange". And I want to call it for all children, and if children decide to, they want to call it on their children. It's kind of bubble event passing. –  queen3 Oct 29 '09 at 15:01
    
where you pass children instance to action in this call? –  Trickster Oct 29 '09 at 15:04
    
or action can be changed after child.NofifyChildren(action, data); call? bu where ref keyword in this case? –  Trickster Oct 29 '09 at 15:06

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