Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm getting the following error when trying to import a stored proc as a function in Entity Framework 5. I have recently updated the data project to reference the new version of EF.

The type parameter 'SSDS.Data.testy_Result' in ExecuteFunction is incompatible with the type 'SSDS.Data.testy_Result' returned by the function.

I can't get it to work for any stored proc...here is my simple test one:

CREATE PROCEDURE testy

AS
BEGIN
    select 'hello' as hello
END
GO

It breaks with the exception above here:

 public virtual ObjectResult<testy_Result> testy()
    {
        return ((IObjectContextAdapter)this).ObjectContext.ExecuteFunction<testy_Result>("testy");
    }

And there is no error when I set the result to a string scalar in the Edit Function Import window in the model designer.

I'm calling the function like this:

private Entities db = new Entities();
var x = db.testy();

Is there something obvious that I'm missing here? There are a few edmx files in my project and the others were created with an older version of EF (and use ObjectContext).

Function Mappings:

enter image description here

More Function Mappings Detail:

enter image description here

testy_Result class:

  public partial class testy_Result
    {
        public string hello { get; set; }
    }
share|improve this question
    
Try casting the value in the procedure to varchar or nvarchar –  Rui Jarimba May 8 '13 at 14:58
    
Check the mappings for your imported function match the selected return type. In Model Explorer, right click an imported function and choose 'Function Import Mapping'. Make sure the properties on the left match the fields on the right –  James May 8 '13 at 17:47
    
@RuiJarimba casting in the proc doesnt help –  woggles May 9 '13 at 14:25
    
@james the function mappings seem correct –  woggles May 9 '13 at 14:39
    
Try this: select cast('hello' as varchar(30)) as hello –  Rui Jarimba May 9 '13 at 15:06

1 Answer 1

I do not know if this helps, but here is what I generally do:

Assuming that you have the following POCO class from the Entity Framework:

using System;

public partial class testy_Result
{
    public string hello { get; set; }
}

The following call generally does the trick for me:

public partial class Entities: DbContext
{

    public virtual ObjectResult<testy_Result> testy()
    {
        ((IObjectContextAdapter)this).ObjectContext.MetadataWorkspace.LoadFromAssembly(typeof(testy_Result).Assembly);

        return ((IObjectContextAdapter)this).ObjectContext.ExecuteFunction<testy_Result>
            ("testy", MergeOption.OverwriteChanges);
    }
}

Also, just in case, I wrap my calls inside the using clause:

        try
        {
            using (Models.Data.Entities Entities = new Models.Data.Entities())
            {
                var x = Entities.testy().FirstOrDefault().hello;
            }
        }
        catch (Exception ex)
        {
            System.Diagnostics.Debug.WriteLine("Error: " + ex.Message);
        }

Let me know if it worked for you.

Cheers.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.