Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
Shape *shape[100];
Square sqr;

void inputdata() {
int len,width;
cout << "enter length";
cin >> len;
cout << "enter width";
cin >> width;

sqr = Square(len,width,0); //---> i have not compute area for this, i just put a 0 for it first     
shape[0] = &sqr;
}

void computeArea() {
int area;
area = shape[0]->computeArea();
//----> need to set my area here after getting it
}

shape is parent class and square is sub-class

after creating the square objects and insert it into shape array. i could not reach the setArea() method in my square class to set the area.

i have already found two solution for this, but feel that it doesnt suit object inheritance polymorphism.

one way is to implement setArea() in shape class(i have setArea() on square class already) and call the setArea method through polymorphism and set it into my square area attributes.

another way is to create a get object method in shape class which is getSquare() so i can reach the getArea() method through the Shape array

is my two method valid? or is there a better way doing it?

class Square: public Shape{

private:
int len;
int width;
int area;

public:
Square(string,int,int,int);
int getArea();
void setArea(int);
};

int Square::computeArea() {
int sqrArea = len*width;
area = setArea(sqrArea);
return sqrArea;
}

int Square::setArea(int _area) {
area = _area;
}
share|improve this question
2  
Show the Square and Shape classes! –  Victor Sand May 8 '13 at 14:29
    
You have an error on inputdata() method, you should use sqr = new Square(len, width, 0), look at warnings generated by your compiler, they are here not only to annoy you. Returning to topic, explain to us, why you need to keep Squares in Shape type array. If you want to use Square-specific method with this array, you can just use Square *square[100]; array. If you want to keep another objects there, why do you use methods that usable only for Squares there? It looks like design problem, provide us with Square and Shape classes so we can help you with it. –  SpongeBobFan May 8 '13 at 14:53
add comment

3 Answers

If your Square really relies on getting its area set by someone passing it the result of its own computeArea(), your design looks wrong.

Why don't you implement computeArea() so that it sets the area on the object as well as returning it?

EDIT

Based on your updated question, why does SetArea() return anything? Actually, as per declaration, it doesn't, but its definition does. Simply drop SetArea() altogether (what sense does it make to set a square's area from outside, anyway?) and do this:

class Square: public Shape {

private:
  int len;
  int width;
  int area;

public:
  Square(string,int,int,int);
  int getArea();
};

int Square::computeArea() {
  area = len*width;
  return area;
}
share|improve this answer
    
lets say i have 3 square objects in my shapeArray, shape[0],shape[1],shape[3] and i compute 3 of them. setting area to my area attributes straight away after calling computeArea() in my square.cpp. will the program able to verify area belongs to which shape array? i though i need something like shape[0].setArea to correctly enter the correct area for each array. –  user2351750 May 8 '13 at 14:46
    
@user2351750 I assume the area is stored in a data member of Square. This means each instance of Square has its own copy of the data member, and it's the one on which its member function computeArea() will operate. These are the very basics of OOP in C++; you might want to read a good book to get to grips with them. –  Angew May 8 '13 at 14:58
    
ok i set it on area attributes in my computeArea() before returning the area. i got an error "void value not ignored as it ought to be. because runtime have not start,so no computation is done yet,so when i set it,i have this error. any ways to ignore or avoid this? –  user2351750 May 8 '13 at 15:08
    
@user2351750 You're asking questions about code you haven't shown. Add the definition of Shape, Square, computeArea() and setArea() to your question. –  Angew May 8 '13 at 15:11
    
@user2351750 Not into comments. Edit your question to put the code in there. –  Angew May 8 '13 at 15:21
show 2 more comments

if you really only want to implement setArea in Square class, you can dynamic_cast

if ( Square *s = dynamic_cast<Square *>shape[0] ) {
  s -> setArea();
}

usually using dynamic_cast is a sign of bad design, in this case why wouldn't Shape implement setArea(), since area is common to all shape.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Computing area should be something common to all shapes, so hoisting computeArea into the base class (and probably making it abstract) seems like a valid solution.

share|improve this answer
    
Yep, that's what I'd have suggested. OTOH, would you consider a Line a Shape - if so, what would be its area? –  Thorsten Dittmar May 8 '13 at 14:31
    
A Shape is 2D object - it has length and width (and thus area). A line is a 1D object - it just has length. –  The Forest And The Trees May 8 '13 at 14:33
    
sorry i have no idea what you mean by hosting computeArea in base class. i have computeArea in both class and shape class already with virtual function working correctly –  user2351750 May 8 '13 at 14:51
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.