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I am working on a Responsive Web Site with CSS Media Queries.

Is the following a good organization for devices? Phone, Ipad (Landscape & Portrait), Desktop and Laptop, Large Screen

What are the common media queries break-point values?

I am planning to use the following breakpoints:

  • 320: Smartphone Portrait
  • 481: Smartphone Landscape
  • 641 or 768 ???: IPad Portrait ???
  • 961: IPad Landscape / Small Laptop ???
  • 1025: Desktop and Laptop
  • 1281: Wide Screen

What do you think? I have a few doubts as ??? points.

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12 Answers 12

Rather than try to target @media rules at specific devices, it is arguably more practical to base them on your particular layout instead. That is, gradually narrow your desktop browser window and observe the natural breakpoints for your content. It's different for every site. As long as the design flows well at each browser width, it should work pretty reliably on any screen size (and there are lots and lots of them out there.)

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I agree but I would like to have a few references to work around it ... I just updated initial text. I added breakpoint values. What do you think? I am still not sure about 641 / 768 / ... –  MDMoura May 9 '13 at 10:46
1  
As I mentioned, if you try to chase screen sizes you'll get overwhelmed, as there are many of them. Let your layout dictate where the breakpoints need to be. You may only need one or two. :) –  ralph.m May 9 '13 at 10:50
1  
Responsive not Adaptive is indeed the right buzzword direction to head in. Agree with you Ralph. (But also understand helping legacy systems be reasonably mobile with stopgap breakpoints is often a necessity.) –  doublejosh Jun 14 '13 at 21:36
2  
This is spot on and should be the accepted answer. There are no 'common' screen sizes. –  iamkeir Jul 30 '13 at 14:37
    
here's a great article outlining why this is a bad way to go about the problem and how you should approach multi device css: bradfrostweb.com/blog/post/… –  prodaea Jul 14 at 20:00
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I've been using:

@media only screen and (min-width: 768px) {
    /* tablets and desktop */
}

@media only screen and (max-width: 767px) {
    /* phones */
}

@media only screen and (max-width: 767px) and (orientation: portrait) {
    /* portrait phones */
}

It keeps things relatively simple and allows you to do something a bit different for phones in portrait mode (a lot of the time I find myself having to change various elements for them).

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Where do you place ipad there? And what if you have a desktop with a large screen? –  MDMoura May 8 '13 at 15:07
    
The ipad is in min-width: 768px. If you have a desktop with a large screen then you can go ahead and add something like @media only screen and (min-width: 1176px). What I put in my answer is the media queries I find myself using the most. –  boz May 8 '13 at 15:17
    
I have also found this: alpha.responsivedesign.is/develop/media-queries/…. But it seems to much for a simple web site. –  MDMoura May 8 '13 at 15:17
    
It depends if you want to show high-resolution images for retina displays with the help of background-size or not. If you do, then you will need separate media queries that detect min-device-pixel-ratio. –  boz May 8 '13 at 15:18
    
could you link to mockup. i fail to see how 767px works with phones –  b_dubb Dec 15 '13 at 1:38
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This is from css-tricks link

/* Smartphones (portrait and landscape) ----------- */
@media only screen 
and (min-device-width : 320px) 
and (max-device-width : 480px) {
/* Styles */
}

/* Smartphones (landscape) ----------- */
@media only screen 
and (min-width : 321px) {
/* Styles */
}

/* Smartphones (portrait) ----------- */
@media only screen 
and (max-width : 320px) {
/* Styles */
}

/* iPads (portrait and landscape) ----------- */
@media only screen 
and (min-device-width : 768px) 
and (max-device-width : 1024px) {
/* Styles */
}

/* iPads (landscape) ----------- */
@media only screen 
and (min-device-width : 768px) 
and (max-device-width : 1024px) 
and (orientation : landscape) {
/* Styles */
}

/* iPads (portrait) ----------- */
@media only screen 
and (min-device-width : 768px) 
and (max-device-width : 1024px) 
and (orientation : portrait) {
/* Styles */
}

/* Desktops and laptops ----------- */
@media only screen 
and (min-width : 1224px) {
/* Styles */
}

/* Large screens ----------- */
@media only screen 
and (min-width : 1824px) {
/* Styles */
}

/* iPhone 4 ----------- */
@media
only screen and (-webkit-min-device-pixel-ratio : 1.5),
only screen and (min-device-pixel-ratio : 1.5) {
/* Styles */
}
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I can tell you I am using just a single breakpoint at 768 - that is min-width: 768px to serve tablets and desktops, and max-width: 767px to serve phones.

I haven't looked back since. It makes the responsive development easy and not a chore, and provides a reasonable experience on all devices at minimal cost to development time without the need to fear a new Android device with a new resolution you haven't factored in.

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Don't confuse pixels with points. Phones at high density (aka retina) screens still report the lower resolution. Here is a nice little CSS gist that may add some hints gist.github.com/levibuzolic/947778 –  DannyB May 8 '13 at 14:59
    
Well, according to this site nmsdvid.com/snippets, Galaxy S2 is 320x533 - so I am not sure how you saw a desktop version. Did you have <meta name="viewport" content="width=device-width, initial-scale=1.0" /> in your <head> ? –  DannyB May 8 '13 at 15:10
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Consider using twitter bootstrap's break points. with such a massive adoption rate you should be safe...

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Instead of using pixels should use em or percentage as it is more adaptive and fluid, better not target devices target your content:

HTML5 rockrs read, mobile first

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your break points look really good. I've tried 768px in samsung tablets and it goes beyond that, so i really like the 961px. you don't necessarily need all of them if you use responsive css techniques, like % width/max-width for blocks and images (text as well).

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If you go to your google analytics you can see which screen resolutions your visitors to the website use:

Audience > Technology > Browser & OS > Screen Resolution ( in the menu above the stats)

My site gets about 5,000 visitors a month and the dimensions used for the free version of responsinator.com are pretty accurate summary of my visitors' screen resolutions.

This could save you from needing to be too perfectionistic.

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Media Queries for Standard Devices

In General for Mobile, Tablets, Desktop and Large Screens

1. Mobiles

 /* Smartphones (portrait and landscape) ----------- */
    @media only screen 
    and (min-device-width : 320px) 
    and (max-device-width : 480px) {

    /* Styles */

    }

2. Tablets

@media only screen 
    and (min-device-width : 768px) 
    and (max-device-width : 1024px) {

         /* Styles */

    }

3. Desktops & laptops

@media only screen 
and (min-width : 1224px) {

    /* Styles */

}

4. Larger Screens

@media only screen 
and (min-width : 1824px) {

    /* Styles */

}

In Detail including landscape and portrait

/* Smartphones (portrait and landscape) ----------- */
    @media only screen 
    and (min-device-width : 320px) 
    and (max-device-width : 480px) {
    /* Styles */
    }

    /* Smartphones (landscape) ----------- */
    @media only screen 
    and (min-width : 321px) {
    /* Styles */
    }

    /* Smartphones (portrait) ----------- */
    @media only screen 
    and (max-width : 320px) {
    /* Styles */
    }

    /* Tablets, iPads (portrait and landscape) ----------- */
    @media only screen 
    and (min-device-width : 768px) 
    and (max-device-width : 1024px) {
    /* Styles */
    }

    /* Tablets, iPads (landscape) ----------- */
    @media only screen 
    and (min-device-width : 768px) 
    and (max-device-width : 1024px) 
    and (orientation : landscape) {
    /* Styles */
    }

    /* Tablets, iPads (portrait) ----------- */
    @media only screen 
    and (min-device-width : 768px) 
    and (max-device-width : 1024px) 
    and (orientation : portrait) {
    /* Styles */
    }

    /* Desktops and laptops ----------- */
    @media only screen 
    and (min-width : 1224px) {
    /* Styles */
    }

    /* Large screens ----------- */
    @media only screen 
    and (min-width : 1824px) {
    /* Styles */
    }

    /* iPhone 4 ----------- */
    @media
    only screen and (-webkit-min-device-pixel-ratio : 1.5),
    only screen and (min-device-pixel-ratio : 1.5) {
    /* Styles */
    }

Reference

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@media only screen and (min-width : 320px) and (max-width : 480px) {/*--- Mobile portrait ---*/}
@media only screen and (min-width : 480px) and (max-width : 595px) {/*--- Mobile landscape ---*/}
@media only screen and (min-width : 595px) and (max-width : 690px) {/*--- Small tablet portrait ---*/}
@media only screen and (min-width : 690px) and (max-width : 800px) {/*--- Tablet portrait ---*/}
@media only screen and (min-width : 800px) and (max-width : 1024px) {/*--- Small tablet landscape ---*/}
@media only screen and (min-width : 1024px) and (max-width : 1224px) {/*--- Tablet landscape --- */}
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Solid start based on common breakpoints. Remove the parts for the screens you don't need. Also if you do , see this SASS version.

// Small screens and above
@media only screen { 
    /* All screen styles */
} 

// Small screens only(!)
@media only screen and (max-width: 640px) { 
    /* max-width 640px (or 40em), mobile-only styles */
} 

// Medium screens and above
@media only screen and (min-width: 641px) { 
    /* min-width 641px (or 40.063em) */
} 

// Medium screens only(!)
@media only screen and (min-width: 641px) and (max-width: 1024px) { 
    /* min-width 641px (or 40.063em) and max-width 1024px (or 64em), for medium screens only like tablets */
} 

// Large screens and above
@media only screen and (min-width: 1025px) { 
    /* min-width 1025px (or 64.063em), e.g. large screens */
} 

// Large screens only(!)
@media only screen and (min-width: 1025px) and (max-width: 1440px) { 
    /* min-width 1025px (or 64.063em) and max-width 1440px (or 90em), for large screen only issues */
} 

// XLarge screens and above
@media only screen and (min-width: 1441px) { 
    /* min-width 1441px (or 90.063em), xlarge screens */
} 

// XLarge screens only(!)
@media only screen and (min-width: 1441px) and (max-width: 1920px) {  
    /* min-width 1441px (or 90.063em) and max-width 1920px (or 120em), for xlarge screen only  */
}

// XXLarge screens and above
@media only screen and (min-width: 1921px) { 
    /* min-width 1921px (or 120.063em), for xlarge screens and up */
}

The em conversions above are just for convenient reference when one 1em is 16px (a common default but by no means a guarantee). The above but with ems is the approach Foundation takes. I don't use that project but I like their reasoning about breakpoints.

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I'm using 4 break points but as ralph.m said each site is unique. You should experiment. There are no magic break points due to so many devices, screens and resolutions.

Here is what I use as template. I'm checking the website for each break point on different mobile devices and updating CSS for each element (ul, div, etc.) is not displaying correctly for that break point.

So far that was working on multiple responsive websites I've made.

/* SMARTPHONES PORTRAIT */
@media only screen and (min-width: 300px) {


}

/* SMARTPHONES LANDSCAPE */
@media only screen and (min-width: 480px) {


}

/* TABLETS PORTRAIT */
@media only screen and (min-width: 768px) {


}


/* TABLET LANDSCAPE / DESKTOP */
@media only screen and (min-width: 1024px) {


}    
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