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I have this code that extends the Ruby Array class:

# Extendes the Array class to have methods giving the same RSpec functionality of
# checking if Array elements equals to another ones'.
class Array
  def self.same_elements?(actual, expected)
    extra_items   = difference_between_arrays(actual, expected)
    missing_items = difference_between_arrays(expected, actual)
    extra_items.empty? & missing_items.empty?
  end

  def has_same_elements?(expected)
    extra_items   = self.class.difference_between_arrays(self, expected)
    missing_items = self.class.difference_between_arrays(expected, self)
    extra_items.empty? & missing_items.empty?
  end

  protected
  def self.difference_between_arrays(array_1, array_2)
    difference = array_1.dup
    array_2.each do |element|
      if (index = difference.index(element))
        difference.delete_at(index)
      end
    end
    difference
  end
end

And this is the spec:

describe Array do
  before(:each) do
    @a = [1,2,3]
    @b = [3,2,1]
    @c = [1,2,3,4]
    @d = [4,1,3]
    @e = [1,2,3]
  end
  it "should respond to .same_elements?" do
    Array.should respond_to(:same_elements?)
  end
  it "should respond to #has_same_elements?" do
    Array.new.should respond_to(:has_same_elements?)
  end

  describe ".same_elements?" do
    it "should return correct values" do
      Array.same_elements?(@a,@a).should eq(true)
      Array.same_elements?(@a,@b).should eq(true)
      Array.same_elements?(@a,@c).should eq(false)
      Array.same_elements?(@a,@d).should eq(false)
      Array.same_elements?(@a,@e).should eq(true)

      Array.same_elements?(@b,@a).should eq(true)
      Array.same_elements?(@b,@b).should eq(true)
      Array.same_elements?(@b,@c).should eq(false)
      Array.same_elements?(@b,@d).should eq(false)
      Array.same_elements?(@b,@e).should eq(true)

      Array.same_elements?(@c,@a).should eq(false)
      Array.same_elements?(@c,@b).should eq(false)
      Array.same_elements?(@c,@c).should eq(true)
      Array.same_elements?(@c,@d).should eq(false)
      Array.same_elements?(@c,@e).should eq(false)

      Array.same_elements?(@d,@a).should eq(false)
      Array.same_elements?(@d,@b).should eq(false)
      Array.same_elements?(@d,@c).should eq(false)
      Array.same_elements?(@d,@d).should eq(true)
      Array.same_elements?(@d,@e).should eq(false)

      Array.same_elements?(@e,@a).should eq(true)
      Array.same_elements?(@e,@b).should eq(true)
      Array.same_elements?(@e,@c).should eq(false)
      Array.same_elements?(@e,@d).should eq(false)
      Array.same_elements?(@e,@e).should eq(true)
    end
  end

  describe "#has_same_elements?" do
    it "should return correct values" do
      @a.has_same_elements?(@a).should eq(true)
      @a.has_same_elements?(@b).should eq(true)
      @a.has_same_elements?(@c).should eq(false)
      @a.has_same_elements?(@d).should eq(false)
      @a.has_same_elements?(@e).should eq(true)

      @b.has_same_elements?(@a).should eq(true)
      @b.has_same_elements?(@b).should eq(true)
      @b.has_same_elements?(@c).should eq(false)
      @b.has_same_elements?(@d).should eq(false)
      @b.has_same_elements?(@e).should eq(true)

      @c.has_same_elements?(@a).should eq(false)
      @c.has_same_elements?(@b).should eq(false)
      @c.has_same_elements?(@c).should eq(true)
      @c.has_same_elements?(@d).should eq(false)
      @c.has_same_elements?(@e).should eq(false)

      @d.has_same_elements?(@a).should eq(false)
      @d.has_same_elements?(@b).should eq(false)
      @d.has_same_elements?(@c).should eq(false)
      @d.has_same_elements?(@d).should eq(true)
      @d.has_same_elements?(@e).should eq(false)

      @e.has_same_elements?(@a).should eq(true)
      @e.has_same_elements?(@b).should eq(true)
      @e.has_same_elements?(@c).should eq(false)
      @e.has_same_elements?(@d).should eq(false)
      @e.has_same_elements?(@e).should eq(true)
    end
  end
end

This code however apparently it's becoming very slow for large arrays.

Is it worth to port this methods in C for performance reasons? How would you tackle the issue? Can you suggest any (recent) article to build such functionality given I'm using Ruby 2.0.0-p0?

update

Benchmark between the two proposed solutions:

                                           user     system      total        real
(sort) instance method arr_1 vs arr_2      1.910000   0.030000   1.940000 (  1.935651)
(set) instance method arr_1 vs arr_2       7.010000   0.360000   7.370000 (  7.377319)
(sort) class method arr_1 vs arr_2         1.920000   0.030000   1.950000 (  1.952080)
(set) class method arr_1 vs arr_2          6.610000   0.320000   6.930000 (  6.919273)
(sort) instance method arr_1 vs arr_3      2.520000   0.090000   2.610000 (  2.620047)
(set) instance method arr_1 vs arr_3       7.620000   0.330000   7.950000 (  7.951402)
(sort) class method arr_1 vs arr_3         1.920000   0.030000   1.950000 (  1.943820)
(set) class method arr_1 vs arr_3          8.130000   0.390000   8.520000 (  8.523959)

Quick bm code:

require 'benchmark'
require 'set'

class Array
  def self.same_elements_with_sort?(actual, expected)
    actual.has_same_elements_with_sort?(expected)
  end

  def has_same_elements_with_sort?(expected)
    self.sort == expected.sort
  end

  # -----

  def self.same_elements?(actual, expected)
    actual.to_set == expected.to_set
  end

  def has_same_elements?(expected)
    Array.same_elements?(self, expected)
  end
end

Benchmark.bm(40) do|b|
  arr_1 = (1..8000000).to_a.sample(40000)
  arr_2 = (1..8000000).to_a.sample(40000)
  arr_3 = arr_1

  b.report('(sort) instance method arr_1 vs arr_2') do
    150.times { arr_1.has_same_elements_with_sort?(arr_2) }
  end

  b.report('(set) instance method arr_1 vs arr_2') do
    150.times { arr_1.has_same_elements?(arr_2) }
  end

  b.report('(sort) class method arr_1 vs arr_2') do
    150.times { Array.same_elements_with_sort?(arr_1, arr_2) }
  end

  b.report('(set) class method arr_1 vs arr_2') do
    150.times { Array.same_elements?(arr_1, arr_2) }
  end

  b.report('(sort) instance method arr_1 vs arr_3') do
    150.times { arr_1.has_same_elements_with_sort?(arr_3) }
  end

  b.report('(set) instance method arr_1 vs arr_3') do
    150.times { arr_1.has_same_elements?(arr_3) }
  end

  b.report('(sort) class method arr_1 vs arr_3') do
    150.times { Array.same_elements_with_sort?(arr_1, arr_3) }
  end

  b.report('(set) class method arr_1 vs arr_3') do
    150.times { Array.same_elements?(arr_1, arr_3) }
  end
end
share|improve this question

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your code comes from RSpec's MatchArray. RSpec computes extra_items and missing_items to provide a meaningful error message.

If you don't need that information, you could just sort the arrays:

class Array
  def self.same_elements?(actual, expected)
    actual.has_same_elements?(expected)
  end

  def has_same_elements?(expected)
    self.sort == expected.sort
  end
end
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, that helped too. Will conduct benchmarks between the two proposed solutions. –  kain May 8 '13 at 15:49
    
sort is native C code, whereas Set is written in Ruby. Looking forward to your benchmarks! –  Stefan May 8 '13 at 16:01
    
Published the benchmarks. Let me know if you find something out of place in the test I conducted. At the moment your solution does appear to be the fastest. –  kain May 8 '13 at 16:41
    
Looks good. At the moment, your machine does appear to be the fastest ;-) –  Stefan May 8 '13 at 16:56
    
2.3 GHz Intel Core i7 Retina MBP, wish my cloud servers could go this fast ;) –  kain May 8 '13 at 21:09

This is probably faster (and easier to read):

require 'set'

class Array
  def self.same_elements?(actual, expected)
    actual.to_set == expected.to_set
  end

  def has_same_elements?(expected)
    Array.same_elements?(self, expected)
  end
end

As of your tests, they don't cover this case:

 [1,2,3].has_same_elements?([1,1,2,3])

The answer should be true, while your implementation returns false.

share|improve this answer
    
Good hint, thanks, specs passes. Yes, I know beforehand I don't have dupes in the arrays. I'm concerned about speed (and memory to some degree) though. I'm going to organize and run some bm. I would also like to take the occasion and learn writing small C modules for Ruby given a real world issue I'm having. Thanks again. –  kain May 8 '13 at 15:13
    
I think Array#difference_between_arrays is already implemented in Ruby (and in C). Its name is Array#-. It works slightly different from your version, but since your input don't have dupes, they behave exactly the same. Try and remove Array#difference_between_arrays and use - instead. –  DNNX May 8 '13 at 15:16
    
Definitely helped with the bottleneck I was having. Bad oversight using the original rspec code. I will conduct benchmarks between Stefan's solution and yours in the next hours. Thanks. –  kain May 8 '13 at 15:49
    
Ok, awesome. Keep us posted please. –  DNNX May 8 '13 at 15:51
    
Published the benchmarks. Let me know if you find something out of place in the test I conducted. Thanks! –  kain May 8 '13 at 16:42

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