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By starting with 1 and 2, the first 10 terms of Fibonacci Series will be:

1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34, 55, 89, ...

Find the sum of all the even-valued terms in the sequence which do not exceed 4 million.


Now, I got the idea for how to do this. But I'm confused about the data types to hold such big data. I'm getting weird results with int. :(

MORE: Its Project Euler 2nd question. But I can't get it. I get crazy values as answer. Can someone please post the ideal program?

EDIT: Here's what I wrote for just printing Fibonacci to screen. Bare Basic. My variable goes crazy even when I give 100 for the limit. Is my code wrong?

// Simple Program to print Fibonacci series in Console
#include <stdio.h>
int main() {
    int x=1,y=2,sum=0,limit=0,i=0,temp=0;
    printf("Enter Limit:");
    scanf("%d",&limit);

    if(limit==1)
        printf("%d",x);
    else if(limit>1) {
        printf("%d %d",x,y);
        if (limit>2) {
            while (i<limit-2) {
                temp=y;
                sum=x+y;
                x=temp;
                y=sum;
                printf(" %d",sum);
                i++;
            }
        }
    }      

    printf("\n");
    return 0;
}

SOLVED: Actually, I managed to get the solution myself. Here's my program. It works.

#include <stdio.h>
int main() {
    int x=1,y=2,sum,limit;     //Here value of first 2 terms have been initialized as 1 and 2
    int evensum=2;             //Since in calculation, we omit 2 which is an even number
    printf("Enter Limit: ");   //Enter limit as 4000000 (4million) to get desired result
    scanf("%d",&limit);
    while( (x+y)<limit ) {
        sum=x+y;
        x=y;
        y=sum;
        if (sum%2==0)
            evensum+=sum;
    }
    printf("%d \n",evensum);
    return 0;
}
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4  
This is project euler question 2. projecteuler.net/index.php?section=problems&id=2 –  recursive Oct 29 '09 at 15:19
2  
This looks more like a ProjetEuler problem then homework to me. –  JRL Oct 29 '09 at 15:20
    
Actually, yes its a Project Euler problem. But I just can't get it work. My program gives me -ve values and all as the result :( –  r0ach Oct 29 '09 at 15:26

11 Answers 11

Since you only want up to four million, it's likely that int is not your problem.

It's quite possible that your program is buggy and that the data storage is just fine, so you should test your program on smaller values. For example, it's clear that the sum of the first three even terms is 44 (hint: every third term is even) so if you run your program with a cap of 50, then you should instantly get 44 back. Keep running small test cases to get confidence in the larger ones.

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Try changing this:

while (i<limit-2)

to this:

while (y<limit)

As written, your program is cycling until it gets to the 4 millionth Fibonacci number (i.e. when i gets to 4 million, though overflow obviously happens first). The loop should check to see when y (the larger Fibonacci number) becomes greater than 4 million.

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For security, use the 'long' data type; the C standard requires that to hold at least 4 billion, but on most machines, 'int' will also hold 4 billion.

enum { MAX_VALUE = 4000000 };
int sum  = 0;
int f_n0 = 0;
int f_n1 = 1;
int f_n2;

while ((f_n2 = f_n0 + f_n1) < MAX_VALUE)
{
    if (f_n2 % 2 == 0)
        sum += f_n2;
    f_n0 = f_n1;
    f_n1 = f_n2;
}
printf("%d\n", sum);
share|improve this answer

int is big enough for values in the millions on almost every modern system, but you can use long if you are worried about it. If that still gives you weird results, then the problem is with your algorithm.

share|improve this answer
    
The meaning of int and long depends on the programming language, OS, and CPU architecture. On x86 with C on Linux, they're both 32-bit –  bdonlan Oct 29 '09 at 15:52
1  
And on x86_64 with C on Windows, they're still both 32-bit. –  ephemient Oct 29 '09 at 17:39
    
I'm on Mac Leopard. Thats still 32bit right? –  r0ach Oct 31 '09 at 16:01

Use BigInt.

Then again, unsigned int stores values up to over 4 billion, so you shouldn't be having any problems even with "sum of all fibonacci numbers up to 4 million" (which, obviously, has to be less than 8 mil)?

share|improve this answer
    
I'm new to C. I'm not well-versed with format-specifiers for various types. Would that be the problem? –  r0ach Oct 29 '09 at 15:29
    
Format specifiers as in printf()? That could be a problem, if not the problem. What data types are you using, and what conversion specifiers are you using for output? –  John Bode Oct 29 '09 at 16:49

One bug that you're probably seeing is the bad formatting of your printf() statements. With a printf("%d %d") followed by a printf(" %d"), numbers of 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34, 55 will print as: 3 5 813 21 3455 which certainly looks like funky output with wildly inappropriate numbers. You need a few more spaces or linefeeds: printf("%d %d\n"), printf(" %d\n").

I also don't see where you're actually checking only for the even terms to contribute to the sum.

share|improve this answer
    
About printf: the inner loop is the only place that printf gets called repetitively, and the coder has correctly inserted a space before each integer. I compiled and ran this code (w/ slight modification, but not to the output commands), and got the following: 1 2 3 5 8 13 21 34 55 89 etc. –  bbg Oct 29 '09 at 18:04

Your program prints F_1 + ..+ F_limit and not F_1 + ... F_n with F_n < limit as you described.

Check the Wikipedia article on Fibonacci Numbers and Sloane A000045: Fibonacci numbers grows exponentially. Checking this table F_48 = 4807526976 which exceeds int. F_100 is 354224848179261915075 which surely overflows even int64_t (your stack doesn't, though).

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up vote 0 down vote accepted

Guys, I got the answer. I confirmed the result and int can handle it. Here's my program:

#include <stdio.h>
int main() {
    int x=1,y=2,sum,limit;     //Here value of first 2 terms have been initialized as 1 and 2
    int evensum=2;             //Since in calculation, we omit 2 which is an even number
    printf("Enter Limit: ");   //Enter limit as 4000000 (4million) to get desired result
    scanf("%d",&limit);
    while( (x+y)<limit ) {
        sum=x+y;
        x=y;
        y=sum;
        if (sum%2==0)
            evensum+=sum;
    }
    printf("%d \n",evensum);
    return 0;
}

Thx for all the replies and help. "Thinking on my feet" to the rescue :)

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An amusing solution is to use the closed form for Fibonacci sequences and the closed form for geometric progressions. The end solution looks like this:

  sum = ( (1-pow(phi_cb, N+1)) / (1-phi_cb) - (1-pow(onephi_cb,N+1)) / (1-onephi_cb)) / sqrt(5);

where

  double phi       = 0.5 + 0.5 * sqrt(5);
  double phi_cb    = pow(phi, 3.0);
  double onephi_cb = pow(1.0 - phi, 3.0);
  unsigned N = floor( log(4000000.0 * sqrt(5) + 0.5) / log(phi) );
  N = N / 3;

with all the caveats regarding double to int-type conversions of course.

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I am not a programmer, but here's an adaptation to Leffler's code without the IF-criterion. It should work for MAX_VALUES above 2 (given there are no mistakes in programming syntax), based on a pattern I found in the even-only fibonacci series: 0,2,8,34,144,610,2584... so interestingly: f_n2 = 4*f_n1 + f_n0. This also means this program only needs 1/3rd of the calculations, since it doesn't even consider/calculate the odd fibonacci numbers.

enum { MAX_VALUE = 4000000 };
int sum  = 2;
int f_n0 = 0;
int f_n1 = 2;
int f_n2 = 8;

while (f_n2 < MAX_VALUE)
{
    sum += f_n2;
    f_n0 = f_n1;
    f_n1 = f_n2;
    f_n2 = 4*f_n1 + f_n0;
}
printf("%d\n", sum);
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Each new term in the Fibonacci sequence is generated by adding the previous two terms. By starting with 1 and 2, the first 10 terms will be:

1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34, 55, 89, ...

By considering the terms in the Fibonacci sequence whose values do not exceed four million, find the sum of the even-valued terms.

   int main()

  {  
     long first = 1, second = 2, next, c;

     int sum=0;
     for ( c = 1 ; c <100000000; c++ )

  {

     next = first + second;
     if(next>=4000000)
     {
     next=  next-second;
     break;
     }

     first = second;
     second = next;    

  if(next%2==0){

     sum=sum+next;
  }

 }

  printf("the sum of even valued  term is %d\n",sum+2);


 }  
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