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I have a database of measurements that indicate a sensor, a reading, and the timestamp the reading was taken. The measurements are only recorded when there's a change. I want to generate a result set that shows the range each sensor is reading a particular measurement.

The timestamps are in milliseconds but I'm outputting the result in seconds.

Here's the table:

CREATE TABLE `raw_metric` (
    `row_id` BIGINT NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
    `sensor_id` BINARY(6) NOT NULL,
    `timestamp` BIGINT NOT NULL,
    `angle` FLOAT NOT NULL,
    PRIMARY KEY (`row_id`)
)

Right now I'm getting the results I want using a subquery, but it's fairly slow when there's a lot of datapoints:

SELECT row_id,
    HEX(sensor_id),
    angle,
    (
        COALESCE((
                SELECT MIN(`timestamp`)
                FROM raw_metric AS rm2
                WHERE rm2.`timestamp` > rm1.`timestamp`
                    AND rm2.sensor_id = rm1.sensor_id
                ), UNIX_TIMESTAMP() * 1000) - `timestamp`
        ) / 1000 AS duration
FROM raw_metric AS rm1

Essentially, to get the range, I need to get the very next reading (or use the current time if there isn't another reading). The subquery finds the minimum timestamp that is later than the current one but is from the same sensor.

This query isn't going to occur very often so I'd prefer to not have to add an index on the timestamp column and slow down inserts. I was hoping someone might have a suggestion as to an alternate way of doing this.

UPDATE: The row_id's should be incremented along with timestamps but it can't be guaranteed due to network latency issues. So, it's possible that an entry with a lower row_id comes occurs AFTER a later row_id, though unlikely.

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The proper way to improve the performance of this subquery is by having an index on raw_metric(sensor_id, timestamp). I would suggest that you add the index and test the performance of the inserts. –  Gordon Linoff May 8 '13 at 17:46
    
@GordonLinoff Yes, this would be the best way to improve the subquery, but is there another (hopefully better) way to do this without the subquery? –  Tim Tisdall May 8 '13 at 17:50
    
@GordonLinoff What about creating a temporary table of raw_metric with the timestamps indexed? –  Tim Tisdall May 8 '13 at 18:12
    
. . You can copy over the table. The index you need is (sensor_id, timestamp). An index on timestamp alone won't help the query. –  Gordon Linoff May 8 '13 at 18:26
    
Well, I didn't include it in my examples, but typically I'd be doing a query for a single sensor_id and for a particular range, so I could copy just those readings into a temporary table for indexing. But would that actually be any faster? –  Tim Tisdall May 8 '13 at 18:30
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4 Answers

This is perhaps more appropriate as a comment than as a solution, but it is too long for a comment.

You are trying to implement the lead() function in MySQL, and MySQL does not, unfortunately, have window functions. You could switch to Oracle, DB2, Postgres, SQL Server 2012 and use the built-in (and optimized) functionality there. Ok, that may not be realistic.

So, given your data structure you need to do either a correlated subquery or a non-equijoin (actually a partial equi-join because there is match on sensor_id). These are going to be expensive operations, unless you add an index. Unless you are adding measurements tens of times per second, the additional overhead on the index should not be a big deal.

You could also change your data structure. If you had a "sensor counter" that was a sequential number enumerating the readings, then you could use this as an equijoin (although for good performance you might still want an index). Adding this in to your table would require having a trigger -- and that is likely to perform even worse than an index for when inserting.

If you only have a handful of sensors, you could create a separate table for each one. Oh, I can feel the groans at this suggestion. But, if you did, then an auto-incremented id would perform the same role. To be honest, I would only do this if I could count the number of sensors on each hand.

In the end, I might suggest that you take the hit during insertion and have "effective" and "end' times on each record (as well as an index on sensor id and either timestamp or id). With these additional columns, you will probably find more uses for the table.

If you are doing this for just one sensor, then create a temoprary table for the information and use an auto-incremented id column. Then insert the data into it:

insert into temp_rawmetric (orig_row_id, sensor_id, timestamp, angle)
    select orig_row_id, sensor_id, timestamp, angle
    from raw_metric
    order by sensor_id, timestamp;

Be sure your table has a temp_rawmetric_id column that is auto-incremented and the primary key (creates an index automatically). The order by makes sure this is incremented according to the timestamp.

Then you can do your query as:

select trm.sensor_id, trm.angle,
       trm.timestamp as startTime, trmnext.timestamp as endTime
from temp_rawmetric trm left outer join
     temp_rawmetric trmnext
     on trmnext.temp_rawmetric_id = trm.temp_rawmetric_id+1;

This will require a pass through the original data to extra the data, and then a primary key join on the temporary table. The first might take some time. The second should be pretty quick.

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I was following you up to the last paragraph... What are these additional columns exactly? –  Tim Tisdall May 8 '13 at 18:26
    
I'll assume "trmnext" was supposed to be "trm2" in your last code example. I'm still confused by your paragraph saying "take the hit during insertion and have "effective" and "end' times on each record ... With these additional columns, you will probably find more uses for the table." Are you talking about some sort of additional column on the table that I insert values into when inserting into raw_metric? –  Tim Tisdall May 8 '13 at 20:08
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Select  rm1.row_id
        ,HEX(rm1.sensor_id)
        ,rm1.angle
        ,(COALESCE(rm2.timestamp, UNIX_TIMESTAMP() * 1000) - rm1.timestamp) as duration
from    raw_metric rm1
left outer join
        raw_metric rm2
on      rm2.sensor_id = rm1.sensor_id
and     rm2.timestamp = (
             select min(timestamp) 
             from   raw_metric rm3
             where  rm3.sensor_id = rm1.sensor_id
             and    rm3.timestamp > rm1.timestamp
             )
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I'm not sure I understand how this is an improvement. Isn't this still doing the same subquery, but now it's adding a join? –  Tim Tisdall May 8 '13 at 16:17
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If you use auto_increment for primary key, you may replace timestamp by row_id in query condition part. Like this:

SELECT row_id,
HEX(sensor_id),
angle,
(
    COALESCE((
            SELECT MIN(`timestamp`)
            FROM raw_metric AS rm2
            WHERE rm2.`row_id` > rm1.`row_id`
                AND rm2.sensor_id = rm1.sensor_id
            ), UNIX_TIMESTAMP() * 1000) - `timestamp`
    ) / 1000 AS duration
FROM raw_metric AS rm1

It must work some quickly.

Also you can add one more subquery for fast select row id of new senser value. See:

SELECT row_id,
HEX(sensor_id),
angle,
(
    COALESCE((
        SELECT timestamp FROM raw_metric AS rm1a
        WHERE row_id = 
        (
            SELECT MIN(`row_id`)
            FROM raw_metric AS rm2
            WHERE rm2.`row_id` > rm1.`row_id`
                AND rm2.sensor_id = rm1.sensor_id
        )
        ), UNIX_TIMESTAMP() * 1000) - `timestamp`
    ) / 1000 AS duration
FROM raw_metric AS rm1
share|improve this answer
    
added an update... I can't guarantee the row_id's are going to follow that way. –  Tim Tisdall May 8 '13 at 16:12
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If you can guarantee that the row_id gets increments as the timestamp grows, you can try to get the min(row_id) and then get the related timestamp. Since it is the primary key, it should be faster.

SELECT row_id,
HEX(sensor_id),
angle,
(
    COALESCE((
            SELECT `timestamp` FROM aw_metric AS rm3 WHERE `row_id` = (
                SELECT MIN(`row_id`)
                FROM raw_metric AS rm2
                WHERE rm2.`row_id` > rm1.`row_id`
                    AND rm2.sensor_id = rm1.sensor_id)
            ), UNIX_TIMESTAMP() * 1000) - `timestamp`
    ) / 1000 AS duration
FROM raw_metric AS rm1
share|improve this answer
    
added an update... I can't guarantee the row_id's are going to follow that way. –  Tim Tisdall May 8 '13 at 16:10
    
since you are showing the results in seconds, it shouldn't really matter, because the time should be very similar, even if there is s swap between 2 ids... unless you have a huge latency. –  jvilhena May 8 '13 at 16:41
    
You're assuming how often the sensor readings come in. If two are swapped, but there's a long duration before the third, the wrong reading will be measured as having occurred for a long time. –  Tim Tisdall May 8 '13 at 16:44
    
oh, you are right... sorry. Then, the only other solution i can think of is to add an "AND rm2.row_id > rm1.row_id - 10" to you inner query, to try to make it use the primary key index. The 10 could be replaced with any value you are comfortable with (max number of swaps you expect to have). –  jvilhena May 8 '13 at 16:55
    
^_^ I was thinking about that solution too... However, this is for a medical application so I don't feel comfortable using any method that has the possibility of giving a wrong result. –  Tim Tisdall May 8 '13 at 17:00
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