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I want to split a file containg HTTP response into two files: one containing only HTTP headers, and one containg the body of a message. For this I need to split a file into two on first empty line (or for UNIX tools on first line containing only CR = '\r' character) using a shell script.

How to do this in a portable way (for example using sed, but without GNU extensions)? One can assume that empty line would not be first line in a file. Empty line can got to either, none or both of files; it doesn't matter to me.

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4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted
$ cat test.txt
a
b
c

d
e
f
$ sed '/^$/q' test.txt 
a
b
c

$ sed '1,/^$/d' test.txt 
d
e
f

Change the /^$/ to /^\s*$/ if you expect there may be whitespace on the blank line.

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It should probably be /^\r$/(or just in case /^\r?$/) –  Jakub Narębski Oct 29 '09 at 16:04

You can use csplit:

echo "a
b
c

d
e
f" | csplit -s - '/^$/'

Or

csplit -s filename '/^$/'

(assuming the contents of "filename" are the same as the output of the echo) would create, in this case, two files named "xx00" and "xx01". The prefix can be changed from "xx" to "outfile", for example, with -f outfile and the number of digits could be changed to 3 with -n 3. You can use a more complex regex if you need to deal with Macintosh line endings.

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3  
+1 you can also use it to split the file into more than 2 parts. –  Zac Thompson Oct 30 '09 at 6:29
    
can you do it straight to an array in bash, rather than creating files? –  mr axilus Mar 7 '13 at 16:08
    
@ZacThompson: I edited the answer to state this, but until it gets reviewed: you can add '{*}' to the end of the command above to split multiple times. e.g. csplit filename '/^$/' '{*}' –  kbeta May 10 '13 at 18:51

Given the awk script

BEGIN { fout="headers" }
/^$/ { fout="body" }
{ print $0 > fout }

awk -f foo.awk < httpfile will write out the two files headers and body for you.

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+1 elegant (to 15 chars) –  Ewan Todd Oct 29 '09 at 15:43

You can extract the first part of your file (HTTP headers) with:

awk '{if($0=="")exit;print}' myFile

and the second part (HTTP body) with:

awk '{if(body)print;if($0=="")body=1}' myFile
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no need to cat to awk. awk takes in a file as input –  ghostdog74 Oct 29 '09 at 23:55
    
You are right, I have edited my answer. –  mouviciel Oct 30 '09 at 6:17

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