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In a standalone (selfhosted) application, I would like to have an httpserver that on a single base adress can either serve simple web pages (without any serverside dynamics/scripting, it just returns the content request files) or serve RESTful webservices:

  • when http://localhost:8070/{filePath} is requested, it should return the content of the file (html, javascript, css, images), just like a normal simple webserver
  • everything behind http://localhost:8070/api/ should just act as a normal RRESTful Web API

My current approach uses ASP.NET Web API to server both the html pages and the REST APIs:

 var config = new HttpSelfHostConfiguration("http://localhost:8070/");
 config.Formatters.Add(new WebFormatter());
 config.Routes.MapHttpRoute(
   name: "Default Web",
   routeTemplate: "{fileName}",
   defaults: new { controller = "web", fileName = RouteParameter.Optional });
 config.Routes.MapHttpRoute(
   name: "Default API",
   routeTemplate: "api/{controller}/{id}",
   defaults: new { id = RouteParameter.Optional });

The WebController is the controller that serves the web pages with this naive code:

public class WebController : ApiController
{
    public HttpResponseMessage Get(string fileName = null)
    {
        /// ...
        var filePath = Path.Combine(wwwRoot, fileName);
        if (File.Exists(filePath))
        {
            if (HasCssExtension(filePath))
            {
                return this.Request.CreateResponse(
                   HttpStatusCode.OK, 
                   GetFileContent(filePath), 
                   "text/css");
            }

            if (HasJavaScriptExtension(filePath))
            {
                return this.Request.CreateResponse(
                   HttpStatusCode.OK,
                   GetFileContent(filePath),
                   "application/javascript");
            }

            return this.Request.CreateResponse(
              HttpStatusCode.OK, 
              GetFileContent(filePath), 
              "text/html");
        }

        return this.Request.CreateResponse(
            HttpStatusCode.NotFound,
            this.GetFileContnet(Path.Combine(wwwRoot, "404.html")),
            "text/html");
    }
}

And again, for everything behind /api, controllers for normal REST APIs are used.

My question now is: Am I on the right track? I kind of feel that I am rebuilding a webserver here, reinventing the wheel. And I guess that there are probably a lot of http request web browsers could make that I do not handle correctly here.

But what other option do I have if I want to self host and at the same time server REST web APIs and web pages over the same base address?

share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

Looks like you are trying to recreate asp.net FileHandler for self host. There is a better solution though. Using Katana(an OWIN host) as the hosting layer for web API. OWIN supports hosting multiple OWIN frameworks in the same app. In your case, you can host both web API and a file handler in the same OWIN app.

Filip has a good blog post on this to get you started here. You can use configuration code like this,

public void Configuration(IAppBuilder appBuilder)
{
    // configure your web api.
    var config = new HttpConfiguration();
    config.Routes.MapHttpRoute("default-api", "api/{controller}");
    appBuilder.UseWebApi(config);

    // configure your static file handler.
    appBuilder.UseStaticFiles();
}
share|improve this answer
    
Is there also a way to integrate WCF REST Services in Katana/OWIN? – bitbonk May 8 '13 at 23:57
    
Not that I know of. – RaghuRam Nadiminti May 9 '13 at 0:47
1  
@bitbonk: I recently found this: nuget.org/packages/Gate.Wcf (not tested it) – Robar Aug 28 '13 at 7:50
    
This only works if you can run .net 4.5. If you're stuck on .net 4.0 like me, OP's approach is the best way. – Nico Jul 1 '15 at 12:59

IMO there is nothing wrong with what you are doing. I use self-host for delivering files, html docs as well as being a regular API. At the core, self-host is using HTTP.SYS just as IIS is.

As RaghuRam mentioned there are Owin hosts that have some optimizations for serving static files, but WCF selfhost is quite capable of getting decent perf for serving files.

share|improve this answer
    
The problem with my approach is that all the code you see in WebController.Get was kind of found with trial and error. I am assuming there is probably much more to a file handler that sends the correct http headers and content with the right encoding etc. in the way that all browser expect it ? How do you handle this when you deliver files? – bitbonk May 9 '13 at 16:53

See this link which uses a more straigftforward approach

Setting app a separate Web API project and ASP.NET app

RouteTable.Routes.IgnoreRoute(".js"); RouteTable.Routes.IgnoreRoute(".html");

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