Dismiss
Announcing Stack Overflow Documentation

We started with Q&A. Technical documentation is next, and we need your help.

Whether you're a beginner or an experienced developer, you can contribute.

Sign up and start helping → Learn more about Documentation →

I am asking this question to get a starting point of the Pythonic way to reduce some of the list contents in the following dictionary using list comprehensions:

{'cycle1': [1, 2407, 2393, 14],
 'cycle2': [2, 1657, 1652, 5], 
 'cycle3': [3, 2698, 2673, 25], 
 'cycle4': [4, 2116, 2102, 14], 
 'cycle5': [5, 2065, 2048, 17], 
 'cycle6': [6, 1633, 1615, 18]}

Each list's columns, though not marked, have these headers:

section_num,account_total,billable_count,nonbillable_count

I want to sum each of the last three columns, account_total, billable_count, non-billable_count in a list comprehension.

I'm just not sure how to sum going through each list member in a comprehension. I need to ask for the values of each key, each value being a list. I'm just a little unsure about how to do that.

share|improve this question
    
The Pythonic way is to have the dict contents be objects rather than lists... – user9876 May 8 '13 at 18:05
    
Specific example? I basically thought I could represent cycle, and the remaining values as a list. What other method would I do? Python isn't forcing objects these days is it? – octopusgrabbus May 8 '13 at 18:06
    
If I understand correctly you have 4 separate related values - section_num, account_total, billable_count, nonbillable_count. In any programming language that looks like an object with 4 distinct fields, not a list. Obviously you can use a list but you have to document it, remember which list index is which field, etc - that might work but it makes maintenance harder, so I think it's bad style unless you have a very good reason that's not mentioned in the question. – user9876 May 8 '13 at 18:12
up vote 3 down vote accepted

How about using zip? This does an individual sum of each column, although I'm not sure that is what you want.

[sum(x) for x in zip(*my_dict.values())[1:]]

This outputs:

[12576, 12483, 93]
share|improve this answer
    
I'm a little confused. What does the '*' do in *my_dict.values())? Also, I'm getting this error in 2.7 [sum(x) for x in zip(*my_dict.values())[1:]] Traceback (most recent call last): File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module> TypeError: 'list' object is not callable – octopusgrabbus May 8 '13 at 18:04
    
It's a way to unpack all the arguments in your data structure. See this link: docs.python.org/2/tutorial/… – squiguy May 8 '13 at 18:05
    
or see stackoverflow.com/questions/2921847/… for an explanation – Fredrik Pihl May 8 '13 at 18:06
    
+1 btw for correct interpretation – Fredrik Pihl May 8 '13 at 18:06
    
@octopusgrabbus Odd, it works for me in 2.7.3. Did you mix a variable name up or not copy it correctly by accident? – squiguy May 8 '13 at 18:10

a bit unclear about the output-format requested, but the line below sums the second column:

In [13]: c = {'cycle1': [1, 2407, 2393, 14],
 'cycle2': [2, 1657, 1652, 5], 
 'cycle3': [3, 2698, 2673, 25], 
 'cycle4': [4, 2116, 2102, 14], 
 'cycle5': [5, 2065, 2048, 17], 
 'cycle6': [6, 1633, 1615, 18]}

In [14]: sum([v[1] for k, v in c.iteritems()])
Out[14]: 12576

Using python3.3

>>> sum([v[1] for v in c.values()])
12576
share|improve this answer
    
I am basically looking to create a cycle -- let's call it cycle9 -- that ignores each list's 0th element and sums all element 1 values, all element 2 values, and all element 3 values. – octopusgrabbus May 8 '13 at 18:01
    
ah, then you need the solution given by @squiguy – Fredrik Pihl May 8 '13 at 18:02
    
Also got this error: sum([v[1] for k, v in c.iteritems()]) Traceback (most recent call last): File "<stdin>", line 1, in <module> TypeError: 'list' object is not callable – octopusgrabbus May 8 '13 at 18:08
    
see updated example, works for me (tm) using 2.7. SLight modification needed for 3.3 – Fredrik Pihl May 8 '13 at 18:12
    
Remove the [] square brackets inside sum to have a generator expression, which is more efficient, instead of a list comprehension. – jamylak May 10 '13 at 8:52

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.