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I have a simple Fortran program in which the main component is a 4-core OpenMP portion that calculates a dot product

OMP_NUM_THREADS=4
...
Do 30 k=1,lines
  co(k)=0
  si(k)=0
  co_temp=0
  si_temp=0

!$OMP PARALLEL DO PRIVATE(dotprod,Qcur) REDUCTION(+:co_temp,si_temp)
    Do 40 i=1,ION_COUNT
      dotprod=(rx(k)*x(i)+ry(k)*y(i)+rz(k)*z(i))*((2*3.1415926535)/l)
      co_temp=co_temp+COS(dotprod)*26 !Qcur/Qavg
      si_temp=si_temp+SIN(dotprod)*26 !Qcur/Qavg
     40 continue

!$OMP END PARALLEL DO

  co(k)=co_temp
  si(k)=si_temp

  q(k)= ( co(k),-si(k) )
  s(k)= s(k) +( q(k) * conjg(q(k)) )
  r(k)=r(k)+q(k)
30 continue

I'm not very experienced with Fortran or its optimization. I'm using xlf90_r file -qsmp=omp to compile. I only get about a 1/2 speedup when using 4 cores, someone else using C has gotten an almost perfect 1/4 speedup doing the same computation. I get about the same amount of time whether the OMP loop is on 30 or 40. Also I time around loop 30 as well as the program as a whole and this loop takes 99.x% of the time, so I'm pretty sure this bit is the bottleneck. Any egregious slow mistakes I've made in this portion that anyone sees?

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The question is a little bit vague as it is formulated. Can you produce a small, compilable test (FORTRAN + C) that reproduces the behavior? Which IBM computer are you targeting? And just to be tedious, a 1/2 speed-up is a 2x slow-down :-) –  Massimiliano May 8 '13 at 19:28
    
The problem with this method is that I don't know C, or else I would. As to the IBM computer, it is a 4-core node on a supercomputer. PowerPC 970 MP is the cores the page says it uses. Essentially I'm just wondering if anyone sees anything that would slow this down so appreciably. –  user1993893 May 8 '13 at 19:35
    
Was the C code run on the same machine? –  Massimiliano May 8 '13 at 19:37
1  
If you really are working on a supercomputer, I suggest you redirect your question to the user support team. If there is no user support team then you are not working on a supercomputer ! –  High Performance Mark May 8 '13 at 20:32
    
C code is run on same machine and node, or an identical node. User support team could probably care less about my problems; suffice to say I'm not their first priority (or second or third...). I'm looking at about 5.5 hours in total iterated over ~28,000 loops on inner loop and 6.5 million on outer loop. –  user1993893 May 8 '13 at 21:03

2 Answers 2

For reasons I don't quite understand, placing the OMP on the outer loop is (very marginally) slower. I wasn't able to figure out why it doesn't parallelize perfectly. However, I was able to speed up this code appreciably. I changed the 2*l*pi variable to a single variable and of only 8 digits. I also cut out the *26 since I could simply multiply the final values by 26 or 26^2. I got a speedup of about 30%. Wouldn't have guessed it, but there you go.

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At a quick glance at your code, it looks like each iteration of your outer loop is independent. I would make that the parallel loop not the inner loop.

OMP_NUM_THREADS=4
...
!$OMP PARALLEL DO PRIVATE(dotprod,Qcur,co_temp,si_temp)
Do 30 k=1,lines
  co(k)=0
  si(k)=0
  co_temp=0
  si_temp=0

  Do 40 i=1,ION_COUNT
    dotprod=(rx(k)*x(i)+ry(k)*y(i)+rz(k)*z(i))*((2*3.1415926535)/l)
    co_temp=co_temp+COS(dotprod)*26 !Qcur/Qavg
    si_temp=si_temp+SIN(dotprod)*26 !Qcur/Qavg
  40 continue

  co(k)=co_temp
  si(k)=si_temp

  q(k)= ( co(k),-si(k) )
  s(k)= s(k) +( q(k) * conjg(q(k)) )
  r(k)=r(k)+q(k)
30 continue
!$OMP END PARALLEL DO
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