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I must write a program which in one of its function will return a derived class via an abstract base class, so when the class being returned to the main may access the derived class virtual methods.

Please keep in mind that I can't change anything in the main program since I am not the one writing it.

#include<iostream>
using namespace std;
class A
{
private:
public:
    virtual void DoIt(void)=0;
    A(void){};
    ~A(void){};
};
class B:
        public A
{
private:
    int Num;
public:
    virtual void DoIt(void){Num=7;cout<<"its done";};
    B(void){};
    ~B(void){};
};
A& returnValue(void) 
{
        B item;
    return item;
}
void main()
{
    A& item=returnValue();
    item.DoIt();
}

When I try to run this the last line breaks the build saying that DoIt is a pure virtual function call. any ideas?

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1  
Is the signature of returnValue fixed? You shouldn't return a reference to a local variable. –  Joseph Mansfield May 8 '13 at 19:43
    
it is not fixed. i can decide how to retrun my value. –  petric May 8 '13 at 19:44
1  
That is the issue. Allocate item dynamically (B* item = new B;). Then return a pointer or a reference to it. That should fix it. –  Named May 8 '13 at 19:48
    
What compiler are you using? ideone has no problem compiling this, but it does cause a runtime error. –  user2093113 May 8 '13 at 19:51
    
that will for sure resolve the problem but it will raise a different one: how can i delete the allocated memory? –  petric May 8 '13 at 19:52

4 Answers 4

up vote 0 down vote accepted

You are returning a reference to a local variable which is destroyed when the call to in returnvalue is complete. Instead try the following:

A &returnValue(void) {
    return *(new B);
}

int main() {
    A& item = returnValue();
    item.DoIt();
}

A better solution is to return a smart pointer and let the people maintaining the main function take responsibility for the lifetime of the object returned by returnvalue:

#include <memory>
...
std::unique_ptr<A> returnValue(void) {
    return std::unique_ptr<A>(new B);
}

int main() {
    auto item = returnValue();
    item->DoIt();
}
share|improve this answer

The item you return in returnValue() is destructed when the function exits. What this function returns is reference to destroyed object. You need to preserve the object somehow. For example:

A& returnValue(void) 
{
    B *item = new B();
    return *item;
}
void main()
{
    A& item=returnValue();
    item.DoIt();
    delete &item; // A's destructor must be virtual for this to work correctly
}

or:

B theItem;
A& returnValue(void) 
{
    return theItem;
}
void main()
{
    A& item=returnValue();
    item.DoIt();
}

BTW you receive "pure virtual function call" error by chance: By the time you call item.DoIt() the virtual table pointer is modified (by B's destructor) to point to A's virtual members, and pure virtual functions get stubbed to a function that displays this error. However you are not guaranteed to reach it, because the virtual table pointer already resides in freed stack memory. The compiler might have reused this memory for something else entirely.

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The problem is that B in returnValue() is a local variable and gets destroyed after the call. This removes the vtable so DoIt() is called on the base class.

Make it static B item; or use new B

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No. If he does that then he will have only one instance of item. He will not be able to create more items by calling the function. –  Named May 8 '13 at 19:51
    
Ok, new it then –  parkydr May 8 '13 at 19:52

There are a couple of issues here. The main one is that the item in returnValue is going out of scope immediately, so there's no longer an object in main on which to call DoIt. Because of this, there's no object with which to follow the inheritance tree. This explains the error you get (item in main isn't of type B anymore because it doesn't exist). I'm surprised it doesn't just crash, however.

To fix this problem, you will want to either make a copy (pass by value instead of reference) of the object or make the object on the heap (and pass a pointer). For the latter:

A* returnValue(void) 
{
        B* item = new B;
    return item;
}

int main()
{
    A* item=returnValue();
    item->DoIt();
    delete item;
}

Another issue is that you have virtual functions, but not virtual destructors! This can be a serious issue. You'll want both virtual ~A(void){}; and virtual ~B(void){}; to be safe.

share|improve this answer
    
thank you all for the answers i really appreciate it, but please tell me if i will allocate it dynamically in the function how will i make sure it is deleted? –  petric May 8 '13 at 19:59
    
By calling delete when you're finished with it. Presumably at the end of the function where you called "returnValue" (here, at the end of main). –  Corey May 8 '13 at 20:04
    
as i said i have no controll over the main –  petric May 8 '13 at 20:06
    
This question isn't really answerable without knowing more about the program. If the part you have no control over is calling your function, then it will expect a certain return value. It will also handle that return value in a certain way. If it was expecting the returned object to be new-ed, it may delete it when it's done. If the function calling returnValue is expecting a reference, then either (a) it thinks the object is static or (b) it thinks the object is owned by something else. If (b), then it's the something else that does the deleting. –  Corey May 8 '13 at 23:12

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