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I am trying to write a program that takes in user input, store it into a vector of strings, and prints out the vector according to the functions.

for this function, "display_backwards", it is supposed to display the input of the user in a mirrored-like image.

I'm having trouble writing the code and it's giving me errors which I don't understand why

this is my code:

void asci_art::display_backwards(vector<string> art)
{
char swap[100];
cout << "Your Artwork in mirrored image" << endl;
cout    << "=============================" <<endl;

for (unsigned int i=0; i < art.size(); i++)
{
    for(int j=0; j < art[i].size(); j++)
    {

        swap[j] = art[i].end()-j;
        art[i].begin()+j = swap[j];
    }
}

for(int k= 0; k < swap.size(); k++)
{
    cout << swap[k];
}
cout << endl;

}

the function is written in a class

the vector, art, has the user input. and for each element of the vector, it stores a line of string what i want to do is to access the string of the element and swap the letters of the string, which i believe would create a mirrored image.

I get compiling errors such as "cannot convert _normal iterator> to char" which i don't understand why because I am dealing with chars, the same type. "no such operation as '='" ??

not understanding why. Can someone explain? or maybe my logic is wrong, so can someone help me rewrite it?

Bare with me, I am not all that great in C++. I appreciate the help.

EDIT: Sorry. forgot to mention that I want it to reflect/mirror it vertically

share|improve this question
1  
Look what begin() and end() return. –  chris May 8 '13 at 19:56
    
Do you want to mirror it vertically or horizontally? –  scones May 8 '13 at 19:57
    
@scones vertically –  user2188311 May 8 '13 at 19:58
1  
nitpick: ASCII has two "i"s. –  maerics May 8 '13 at 20:03
    
@maerics thats very irrelevant to the problem I'm having but thank you anyway.. –  user2188311 May 8 '13 at 20:13

3 Answers 3

Use std::reverse to reverse each string in the vector.

void asci_art::display_backwards(vector<string> art)
{
  for( auto&& a : art ) {
    std::reverse(a.begin(), a.end()); // reverses each string
    std::cout << a << std::endl;
  }
}

Or if you want to reverse the order of the strings in the vector, a slightly different call to reverse will do the trick.

void asci_art::display_backwards(vector<string> art)
{
  std::reverse( art.begin(), art.end() );  // reverses order of strings in vector
  for( auto const& a : art ) {
    std::cout << a << std::endl;
  }
}
share|improve this answer
1  
+1 Tell him explicitly that the first one is for vertical mirroring while the second is for horizontal mirroring. :D –  Mohammad Ali Baydoun May 8 '13 at 20:02
    
@Praetorian it says it needs an initializer before ":" –  user2188311 May 8 '13 at 20:10
    
@user2188311 Are you using a compiler that supports C++11's range-based for loop? If not, write a regular for loop for( vector<string>::iterator first = art.begin(); first != art.end(); ++first ) { ... } –  Praetorian May 8 '13 at 20:14
    
@Praetorian im using a compiler in linux OS. –  user2188311 May 8 '13 at 20:20
    
@user2188311 What compiler and version? If it's a newer version of gcc or clang, you may be able to get it to compile by adding the -std=c++11 (or -std=c++0x) switch to the compiler options. –  Praetorian May 8 '13 at 20:26

The problem is with : art[i].begin()+j=swap[j] what are you trying to do? assigning 'swap[j]' which is a character to an integer?

share|improve this answer
    
i was hoping to store the character of art[i] into a char array, swap –  user2188311 May 8 '13 at 20:10

Within your code you are mixing the usage of direct array access and iterators. To make your code work as wanted, you would need to decide for one of those.

A second thing is, you try to store the reversed array. Since you do not return the result of that, you would not need to do that. You can just directly output the data in reversed order.

Examples:

// using direct access
void asci_art::display_backwards_direct(std::vector<std::string> art) {
  std::cout << "Your Artwork in mirrored image" << std::endl;
  std::cout << "=============================" <<std::endl;

  for (signed int i = art.size() - 1; i >= 0; --i) {
    std::cout << art[i]; // depending on your data you might need endl here
  }
  std::cout << std::endl;
}

// using iterators
void asci_art::display_backwards_iterators(std::vector<std::string> art) {
  std::cout << "Your Artwork in mirrored image" << std::endl;
  std::cout << "=============================" <<std::endl;

  for (std::vector<std::string>::iterator it = art.rbegin(); it != art.rend(); ++it) {
    std::cout << *it; // depending on your data you might need endl here
  }
  std::cout << std::endl;
}

// using direct access
void asci_art::display_backwards_direct_horizontal(std::vector<std::string> art) {
  std::cout << "Your Artwork in mirrored image" << std::endl;
  std::cout << "=============================" <<std::endl;

  for (signed int i = 0; i < art.size(); ++i) {
    std::cout << std::reverse(art[i].begin(), art[i].end()); // depending on your data you might need endl here
  }
  std::cout << std::endl;
}

// using iterators
void asci_art::display_backwards_iterators_horizontal(std::vector<std::string> art) {
  std::cout << "Your Artwork in mirrored image" << std::endl;
  std::cout << "=============================" <<std::endl;

  for (std::vector<std::string>::iterator it = art.begin(); it != art.end(); ++it) {
    std::cout << std::reverse(it->begin(), it->end()); // depending on your data you might need endl here
  }
  std::cout << std::endl;
}

C++11 syntax would shorten the second version.

Unrelated: using references for passing arguments may speed up the application, when you deal with really vectors, so the vector would not be copied every time.

void some_function(std::vector<std::string> const & const_reference_to_my_string_vector) {
  std::cout << const_reference_to_my_string_vector.size() << std:endl;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you but it didn't output it mirrored –  user2188311 May 8 '13 at 20:23
    
well not vertically –  user2188311 May 8 '13 at 20:27
    
added the according versions for mirroring over a vertical axis. –  scones May 8 '13 at 20:35

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