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I'm trying to make a sequencer that will act as master clock for other devices.

I've managed to get the sync timer up and running and controlling a DAW with it. However, the tempo is very unstable and sways heavily +- 1 BPM.

I used the standard 24 PPQ in my app initially, but quickly relaized the bad quality of the timing, so I tried 96 PPQ which resulted in a tempo that was a few times faster than it should be.

I'm using a timer, the method scheduleAtFixedRate to add timing clock messages to an output queue, like so:

/**  
 *  Used every time the tempo is changed.
 * 
 *  Adds a Timer to a list. When a new Timer is added, the previous one is removed.
 *  Timing clock messages are added to the output queue at a rate set by the current
 *  Timer in the List.
 */
private void setNewTempoTimer()
{
    Log.i(DEBUG_TAG, "set new tempo timer.");

    if(!timerList.isEmpty())
    {
        timerList.getFirst().cancel();
        timerList.removeFirst();
    }

    final Timer timer = new Timer();

    timerList.add(timer);


    /**
     * The shortest time interval in MIDI
     */
    long tick = _sixteenthNote / 6;

    /**
     * Starts adding messages to the output queue
     */
    timer.scheduleAtFixedRate(
            new TimerTask()
            {

                @Override
                public void run()
                {
                    if(_running)
                    {
                        setNewTimingMessage();  

                    }
                }
            }, 0, tick);

}

The tempo is calculated like this:

/**
 * Calculates the length of a semiquaver in the sequencer
 * @return the time of a semiquaver in milliseconds
 */
private void calculateTempo()
{
    Log.i(DEBUG_TAG , "Calculated tempo.");

    /**
     * FjÀrdedelsnot
     */
    _quarterNote = Math.round(((60000/_tempo))*100000)/100000;

    /**
     * Sextondel
     */
    _sixteenthNote = (_quarterNote/4);

    _sixteenthNote = Math.round(_sixteenthNote*100000)/100000;

}

New timing messages are set like this:

/**
 * Sets new timing message in the midi output queue
 */
private void setNewTimingMessage()
{
    try
    {
        _midiOut.addMessageToQueue(MIDI_TIMING_CLOCK, 0,0);
    }
    catch (InvalidMidiDataException e)
    {
        e.printStackTrace();
    }
    Log.i(DEBUG_TAG , "Set new message.");


}

Please shine a light for me.

Regards /M

share|improve this question
    
I'm not Java guy, so I don't know if there is a high resolution timer available for your use. (Put it on its own thread, with a high or realtime priority?) But I wanted to mention that MIDI timing accuracy is always tricky anyway. +/- 1 BPM isn't the end of the world if your DAW averages out the last 48 ticks or so. What DAW are you using? Is there an option for this? –  Brad May 9 '13 at 14:59
    
I was measuring it in Ableton, and it runs fine enough and doesn't sound all that skippy atleast to me. Problem is, the Internal sequencer (that drives a drum track) will run on exactly the integer value that the tempo is set to, and if the slaved unit will drift in tempo it'll start sounding very jazzy.. –  hacke May 9 '13 at 15:22
    
Hmmm, so the sequencer is looking at tempo and not actual ticks for position? Sounds like a bug in Live to me. If that is the case, even if your application were very accurate the sequencer would still drift over time. I dont' know what you are building, but if Ableton Live support is important... maybe you could control the tempo with a CC and let Live be master clock? –  Brad May 9 '13 at 16:20
    
I'm making a drum machine. The internal sequencer is set to an integer value and then transmits F8-messages at a rate set by the timer. I want my app to be compatible with any midi device and I'm planning on adding sync in at a later stage. How can I set tempo with CC? –  hacke May 9 '13 at 18:04
    
Ah I see. So the software you are writing is a sequencer and you are also sending MIDI sync messages. If this is the case, you should have no drift troubles, as the receiving end keeps track of how many ticks you sent... not what the particular BPM is at any given time. –  Brad May 9 '13 at 19:03

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