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For example:

array[] = {3, 9, 10, **12**,1,4,**7**,2,**6**,***5***}

First, I need maximum value=12 then I need maximum value among the rest of array (1,4,7,2,6,5), so value=7, then maxiumum value of the rest of array 6, then 5, After that, i will need series of this values. This gives back (12,7,6,5).

How to get these numbers? I have tried the following code, but it seems to infinite I think I'll need ​​a recursive function but how can I do this?

max=0; max2=0;...
   for(i=0; i<array_length; i++){

             if (matrix[i] >= max)
                max=matrix[i];

             else {
                  for (j=i; j<array_length; j++){

                      if (matrix[j] >= max2)
                      max2=matrix[j];

                      else{
                       ...
                        ...for if else for if else
                         ...??
                      }
                  }
             }
         }
share|improve this question
    
Can you use algorithms from the Standard Library? –  Andy Prowl May 8 '13 at 20:32
    
@yngum- The OP specifically wants the biggest value that comes after the first largest value in the array. It's possible that the top four values might all be before the largest value in the array. –  templatetypedef May 8 '13 at 20:32
    
@templatetypedef: It is actually impossible since the largest value is one of the top four values and thus it cannot be before itself. But other than the technicality... :P –  David Rodríguez - dribeas May 9 '13 at 0:28

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

This is how you would do that in C++11 by using the std::max_element() standard algorithm:

#include <vector>
#include <algorithm>
#include <iostream>

int main()
{
    int arr[] = {3,5,4,12,1,4,7,2,6,5};

    auto m = std::begin(arr);
    while (m != std::end(arr))
    {
        m = std::max_element(m, std::end(arr));
        std::cout << *(m++) << std::endl;
    }
}

Here is a live example.

share|improve this answer
    
@templatetyepedef: Andy's code with your example input: ideone.com/YDcdvD –  Benjamin Lindley May 8 '13 at 20:40
    
My apologies, you are correct. My apologies! However, this runs in time O(n^2) in the worst case (given a descending sequence), which would not be good for large inputs. –  templatetypedef May 8 '13 at 20:41
    
@templatetypedef: Sorry, deleted the previous comment, you're correct about complexity. Still, it seems to me this algorithm is simple and easy to understand, so unless worst-case complexity proves to be an issue, it is a good candidate for being chosen. –  Andy Prowl May 8 '13 at 20:42
    
it is look like good but I don't know data stuctures and objects. Actually my aim is to show the silhouette of buildings depends on viewpoint. p1305.hizliresim.com/19/9/mw3mn.png Use a pointer and dynamically allocate memory in run time. Use appropriate pointer arithmetic to access buildings. Do not use arrays and array index. So without objects or data structures Everything was going alright until writing of height of buildings, I could not make algorithm –  notch May 8 '13 at 23:40

This is an excellent spot to use the Cartesian tree data structure. A Cartesian tree is a data structure built out of a sequence of elements with these properties:

  • The Cartesian tree is a binary tree.
  • The Cartesian tree obeys the heap property: every node in the Cartesian tree is greater than or equal to all its descendants.
  • An inorder traversal of a Cartesian tree gives back the original sequence.

For example, given the sequence

4  1  0  3  2

The Cartesian tree would be

   4
    \
     3
    / \
   1   2
    \
     0

Notice that this obeys the heap property, and an inorder walk gives back the sequence 4 1 0 3 2, which was the original sequence.

But here's the key observation: notice that if you start at the root of this Cartesian tree and start walking down to the right, you get back the number 4 (the biggest element in the sequence), then 3 (the biggest element in what comes after that 4), and the number 2 (the biggest element in what comes after the 3). More generally, if you create a Cartesian tree for the sequence, then start at the root and keep walking to the right, you'll get back the sequence of elements that you're looking for!

The beauty of this is that a Cartesian tree can be constructed in time Θ(n), which is very fast, and walking down the spine takes time only O(n). Therefore, the total amount of time required to find the sequence you're looking for is Θ(n). Note that the approach of "find the largest element, then find the largest element in the subarray that appears after that, etc." would run in time Θ(n2) in the worst case if the input was sorted in descending order, so this solution is much faster.

Hope this helps!

share|improve this answer

If you can modify the array, your code will become simpler. Whenever you find a max, output that and change its value inside the original array to some small number, for example -MAXINT. Once you have output the number of elements in the array, you can stop your iterations.

share|improve this answer
    
You've essentially described an out-of-place selection sort, not at all what the OP wants. –  Benjamin Lindley May 8 '13 at 20:46
std::vector<int> output;
for (auto i : array)
{
    auto pos = std::find_if(output.rbegin(), output.rend(), [i](int n) { return n > i; }).base();
    output.erase(pos,output.end());
    output.push_back(i);
}

Hopefully you can understand that code. I'm much better at writing algorithms in C++ than describing them in English, but here's an attempt.

Before we start scanning, output is empty. This is the correct state for an empty input.

We start by looking at the first unlooked at element I of the input array. We scan backwards through the output until we find an element G which is greater than I. Then we erase starting at the position after G. If we find none, that means that I is the greatest element so far of the elements we've searched, so we erase the entire output. Otherwise, we erase every element after G, because I is the greatest starting from G through what we've searched so far. Then we append I to output. Repeat until the input array is exhausted.

share|improve this answer
    
it is look like good but I don't know data stuctures and objects. Actually my aim is to show the silhouette of buildings depends on viewpoint. p1305.hizliresim.com/19/9/mw3mn.png Use a pointer and dynamically allocate memory in run time. Use appropriate pointer arithmetic to access buildings. Do not use arrays and array index. So without objects or data structures Everything was going alright until writing of height of buildings, I could not make algorithm –  notch May 8 '13 at 23:37

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