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I have a piece of code for parallel hashing, the insert code is as follows:

int main(int argc, char** argv){
     .....
    Entry* table;//hash table
    for(size_t i=0;i<N;i++){
       keys[i]=i;
       values[i] = rand();//random key-value pairs
    }
    int omp_p = omp_get_max_threads();
    #pragma omp parallel for
    for(int p=0;p<omp_p;p++){
       size_t start = p*N/omp_p;
       size_t end = (p+1)*N/omp_p;//each thread gets contiguous chunks of the arrays
       for(size_t i=start;i<end;i++){
          size_t key = keys[i];
          size_t value = values[i];
          if(insert(table,key,value) == 0){
             printf("Failure!\n");
          }
       }
    }
    ....
    return 0;
}

int insert(Entry* table,size_t key, size_t value){
   Entry entry = (((Entry)key) << 32)+value; //Coalesce key and value into an entry
   /*Use cuckoo hashing*/
   size_t location = hash_function_1(key);

   for(size_t its=0;its<MAX_ITERATIONS;its++){
       entry = __sync_lock_test_and_set(&table[location],entry);
       key=get_key(entry);
       if(key == KEY_EMPTY)
          return1;
       }
       /*We have replaced a valid key, try to hash it using next available hash function*/
       size_t location_1 = hash_function_1(key);
       size_t location_2 = hash_function_2(key);
       size_t location_3 = hash_function_3(key);
       if(location == location_1) location = location_2;
       else if(location == location_2) location = location_3;
       else                            location = location_1;
   }
   return 0;
}

The insert code doesn't scale at all. If I use a single thread, for say, 10M keys, I complete in about 170ms, whereas using 16 threads, I take > 500ms. My suspicion is that this is because the cache line (consisting of the table[] array) is being moved around between the threads during the write operation (__sync_lock_test_and_set(...)) and the invalidation results in a slow down For example if I modify the insert code to just:

int insert(Entry* table,size_t key, size_t value){
   Entry entry = (((Entry)key) << 32)+value; //Coalesce key and value into an entry

   size_t location = hash_function_1(key);
   table[location] = entry;
   return 1;
}

I still get the same bad performance. Since this is hashing, I cannot control, where a particular element hashes to. So any suggestions? Also, if this isn't the right reason, any other pointers as to what might be going wrong? I have tried it from 1M to 100M keys, but the single threaded performance is always better.

share|improve this question
    
Is there any reason to manually assign the chunk to threads (instead having OpenMP doing it)? –  Massimiliano May 9 '13 at 13:54
    
i get slightly better results though single core performance still hits me bad –  user1715122 May 9 '13 at 18:22
    
I don't get why... You are dividing an array like static would do. Further, the array is read-only in the multi-threaded part of your code. –  Massimiliano May 9 '13 at 18:35

2 Answers 2

I have a few suggestions. Since the run time of your insert function is not constant then you should use schedule(dynamic). Second, you should let OpenMP divide the tasks and not do it yourself (one reason, but not the main reason, is that the way you have it now N has to be a multiple of omp_p). If you want to have some control over how it divides the tasks then try changing the chunksize like this schedule(dynamic,n) where n is the chuck size.

#pragma omp parallel for schedule(dynamic)
for(size_t i=0;i<N;i++){
    size_t key = keys[i];
    size_t value = values[i];
    if(insert(table,key,value) == 0){
       printf("Failure!\n");
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
No, that doesn't help. The insert procedure is still bad. I don't need to worry about omp_p not being a multiple of N since that is in my hands. –  user1715122 May 9 '13 at 11:25
    
Oh, I missed the part about the insert procedure not working. Maybe you have a race condition. For example at "table[location] = entry;" or "entry = __sync_lock_test_and_set(&table[location],entry);" If different values of key, value, entry produce the same location I think that would give a race condition. Have you tried putting these in a critical section? –  user2088790 May 9 '13 at 11:42
    
No, the insert procedure is working correctly. When I mean, its bad, I mean the performance is bad i.e. it isn't scaling with the number of cores, probably due to false and/or true sharing. –  user1715122 May 9 '13 at 12:25

I would try experimenting with a strategy based on locks, like this simple snippet shows:

#include<omp.h>

#define NHASHES 4
#define NTABLE  1000000
typedef size_t (hash_f)(size_t);

int main(int argc, char** argv) {
  Entry      table [NTABLE ]; 
  hash_f     hashes[NHASHES];
  omp_lock_t locks [NTABLE ]
  /* ... */
  for(size_t ii = 0; ii < N; ii++) {
    keys    [ii] = ii;
    values  [ii] = rand();
  }
  for(size_t ii = 0; ii < NTABLE; ii++) {
    omp_init_lock(&locks[ii]);
  }
#pragma omp parallel
  {
#pragma omp for schedule(static)
    for(int ii = 0; ii < N; ii++) {

    size_t key   = keys  [ii];
    size_t value = values[ii];
    Entry  entry = (((Entry)key) << 32) + value;

    for ( jj = 0; jj < NHASHES; jj++ ) {
      size_t location = hashes[jj];   // I assume this is the computationally demanding part
      omp_set_lock(&locks[location]); // Locks the hash table location before working on it
      if ( get_key(table[location]) == KEY_EMPTY ) {
        table[location] = entry;
        break;
      }
      omp_unset_lock(&locks[location]); // Unlocks the hash table location
    }
    // Handle failures here
    }
  } /* pragma omp parallel */
  for(size_t ii = 0; ii < NTABLE; ii++) {
    omp_destroy_lock(&locks[ii]);
  }
  /* ... */
  return 0;
}

With a little more machinery you can handle a variable number of locks ranging from 1 (equivalent to a critical section) to NTABLE (equivalent to an atomic construct) and see if the granularity in-between provides some benefit.

share|improve this answer
    
Wouldn't adding locks just slow down the code? For example, see the second "insert" code snippet I posted where I don't care if threads clobber each other's entries. i.e "table[location]=entry". This doesn't require any synchronization and is embarrassingly parallel but it is still not scalable. –  user1715122 May 9 '13 at 20:11
1  
Did you check if your code is bound by memory bandwidth? –  Massimiliano May 10 '13 at 7:06

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