Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am attempting to find the geometric mean of a small array of integers using Math.pow. This is my first time using this syntax and I am not sure how to go about finishing my code.

I am currently going through last years exam papers and this is one of the questions.

Please forgive any errors in my code. I am still learning Java.

public class AverageOfArray {

public static void main(String []args){

    int [] data = new int[3];
    data[0] = 2;
    data[1] = 4;
    data[2] = 8;

    int y = 0;
    int sum = 0;
    for(int i = 0; i < data.length; i++){
        sum = sum + data[i];
        y++;
    }

    Math.pow(sum, 1.0/data.length);
    System.out.println(sum);

}

}

Although the code runs fine without error, it is not giving me the output I require. The mean should be 4.

Here is the code after some edits:

public class AverageOfArray {

public static void main(String []args){

    int [] data = new int[3];
    data[0] = 2;
    data[1] = 4;
    data[2] = 8;


    double sum = 1.0;

    for(int i = 0; i < data.length; i++){
        sum = sum * data[i];
    }

    double geoMean = Math.pow(sum, 1.0/data.length);
    System.out.println(geoMean);

}

}

However it is now returning 3.9999996? Am I looking at Math.abs here now?

share|improve this question
add comment

4 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Your geometric mean calculation is incorrect. You must multiply all of the values together instead of adding them. And your initial product must start with 1.0.

double product = 1.0;

and later...

product = product * data[i];

Additionally, store the result of Math.pow in a new variable -- a double, because that's what Math.pow returns.

double geoMean = Math.pow(product, 1.0 / data.length);
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your feedback! I was looking at that. I was researching on another website and there they were using addition!! Thank you. –  PrimalScientist May 8 '13 at 21:21
    
Yes, got it now. I keep forgetting about capturing my output. Thank you!! –  PrimalScientist May 8 '13 at 21:23
    
Hmmm, my output is 3.9999999999999996. Would I require Math.abs here to? –  PrimalScientist May 8 '13 at 21:40
1  
It looks like a few minor floating-point errors have shown up here. It's likely that this is "close enough" for your purposes. You can use String.format or a DecimalFormat to format your number with a given number of decimal places, e.g. 4.00 for 2 decimal places. –  rgettman May 8 '13 at 21:43
    
Many thanks for your help @rgettman –  PrimalScientist May 8 '13 at 21:44
show 1 more comment
public static double geoMean(double[] arr) {

    if (arr.length == 0) {
        return 0.0;
    }

    double gm = 1.0;
    for (int i = 0; i < arr.length; i++) {
        gm *= arr[i];
    }
    gm = Math.pow(gm, 1.0 / (double) arr.length);

    return gm;
}
share|improve this answer
    
This is great, thank you!! =] –  PrimalScientist May 8 '13 at 21:21
    
You are welcome :) –  Ozan Deniz May 8 '13 at 21:27
add comment

From Wikipedia, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Geometric_mean#Relationship_with_arithmetic_mean_of_logarithms, it is common to implement a different (but equivalent) version of the geometric mean formula. That version uses logarithms to avoid over- and underflows. In Java, it may look look like this:

class GeometricMean {
    private GeometricMean() {}

    public static void main(String[] args) {
        long[] data = new long[]{2, 4, 8};
        double gm = geometricMean(data);
        System.out.println("Geometric mean of 2, 4 and 8: " + gm );
    }

    public static double geometricMean(long[] x) {
        int n = x.length;
        double GM_log = 0.0d;
        for (int i = 0; i < n; ++i) {
            if (x[i] == 0L) {
                return 0.0d;
            }
            GM_log += Math.log(x[i]);
        }
        return Math.exp(GM_log / n);
    }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for your answer. I have not covered Math.log or Math.exp yet!! Many thanks though!! =] –  PrimalScientist Feb 6 at 12:41
add comment

Your code has a couple of problems. First, you need to multiply values to get a geometric mean. Then, simply calling Math.pow will not change the value; it returns a new value that you must capture. For example:

sum = Math.pow(sum, 1.0 / data.length);
share|improve this answer
    
Ahh, yes I see. Thank you. Then return it, or just print it. –  PrimalScientist May 8 '13 at 21:22
    
Capture!! Yes thank you. –  PrimalScientist May 8 '13 at 21:23
    
Thanks for your feed back Ted. –  PrimalScientist May 8 '13 at 21:43
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.