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I create a random number and then I check if it exists in a database table. If it does, I generate another one and check again, so would the following work?

public int GenerateNumber()
{
    Random r = new Random();
    int num = r.Next(1000);

    //Psuedo-code
    if(num is in table)
        GenerateNumber();

    return num;
}

It seems based on the answers below that recursion should be avoided here and I should auto-increment the number, so would a good alternative be to either start the auto-increment at 1 and pad with 0's until is is 8 characters long or start at 10,000,000.

Also, what if the datatype has to be a varchar(8). How can I auto-increment a number, but store in it in a varchar(8)?

share|improve this question

closed as not a real question by Marc B, George Duckett, Daniel Kelley, Xaisoft, kristian May 10 '13 at 4:09

It's difficult to tell what is being asked here. This question is ambiguous, vague, incomplete, overly broad, or rhetorical and cannot be reasonably answered in its current form. For help clarifying this question so that it can be reopened, visit the help center.If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

    
I voted to close this question to help whoever wants to close it. – Xaisoft May 9 '13 at 18:25
up vote 5 down vote accepted

This is not a problem that needs to be solved by recursion. Not to mention the fact that if you have a fair few numbers in your database, and this loops lots of times, you'll quickly get a Stack overflow error. Why not change it to an iterative function:

public int GenerateNumber()
{
    Random r = new Randon();
    int num = r.Next(1000);

    while(num is in database)
    {
        num = r.Next(1000);
    }

    return num;
}

A different approach, while I'm here

Why not implement some transitive difference between these values? I.e: The first number is one, then two etc. Then all you need to do is get the most recent entry, and add one to it. No need to consistently keep making database queries.

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1  
So we got rid of the stack overflow, and now only have to reckon with non-deterministic run times and race conditions. Progress! – Jon May 8 '13 at 21:32
    
Check my edit :) – christopher May 8 '13 at 21:32
    
@ChrisCooney - Thanks, it will actually be 100,000,000. – Xaisoft May 8 '13 at 21:37
1  
there is a do{}while loop which would reduce the redundancy in your code – CodesInChaos May 8 '13 at 22:08

There are numerous problems with your approach here that have been addressed by others, so instead I'll answer a question you should have asked but didn't:

What are the characteristics that a problem must have in order to correctly use recursion?

You must not use recursion unless your solution exhibits all of the following characteristics:

  • There is a "trivial" version of the problem that can always be solved without recursion.
  • Every non-trivial problem can be reduced to one or more strictly smaller problems.
  • Repeatedly reducing a problem to a smaller problem eventually results in an attempt to solve a trivial problem, after a small number of steps, where by "small" we mean, say, a few hundred steps, not a few million. (This condition can be relaxed in "tail recursive" languages; C# is not a tail recusive language.)
  • The solutions to the smaller problems can always be efficiently combined into a solution to the larger problem.

Your sample code exhibits none of these characteristics; use of recursion requires that you exhibit all of these characteristics, so under no circumstances should you use recursion.

Let me give you an example of a problem that is well solved by recursion:

A tree is either empty or consists of a left and right sub-tree; the tree never contains loops. The height of an empty tree is zero; the height of a non-empty tree is the length of the longest path from the root to the "deepest" empty sub-tree. Write a method that determines the height of a tree, assuming that the height is less than 200.

This problem exhibits all the characteristics of a problem that can be solved with recursion, so we can do so. Every recursive program has the pattern:

  • Solve the trivial problem if you can.
  • Otherwise, split up the problem into smaller problems, solve them recursively, and compose the solutions.

So let's do that:

int Height(Tree tree)
{
    // Trivial case:
    if (tree.IsEmpty) return 0;
    // Non-trivial case: reduce the problem to two smaller problems:
    int leftHeight = Height(tree.Left);
    int rightHeight = Height(tree.Right);
    int height = Math.Max(leftHeight, rightHeight) + 1;
    return height;
}
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1  
The OP's recursive patter would be fine in a tail-recursive language and probably even idiomatic in some functional languages. – CodesInChaos May 8 '13 at 22:14
    
One could even argue that this problem fulfills all conditions you mentioned. 1) trivial version is when no duplicates were detected 2) The problem doesn't need to be strictly smaller, as long as it's smaller on average, which is the case here if the max number is larger than the table size. 3) The chance of reaching a certain recursion depth drops exponentially. Provided the maximum is sufficiently larger than the table size it won't reach high values. 4) trivial | I won't argue that it's a good solution in C#, but it's not as bad as you make it appear. – CodesInChaos May 8 '13 at 22:17
    
@CodesInChaos, the OP's problem is never guaranteed to terminate. If his range is 1000 (or 100,000,000) integers, and every one of them is used, he will simply continue to recurse infinitely until the end of time, if such a thing were possible. – Anthony Pegram May 8 '13 at 22:18
1  
@AnthonyPegramThat's why I mentioned that the max value need to be sufficient larger than the table size. For the case where it isn't, the problem is that it's impossible to fulfill the spec, not the algorithm. The while loop suffers from the same issue. – CodesInChaos May 8 '13 at 22:21
    
@CodesInChaos, I was adding my comment after your first. At any rate, recursion seems particularly ill-suited here (ironic in that we still have next to no idea what the OP's problem actually is). – Anthony Pegram May 8 '13 at 22:27

This could result in a very bad performance. Use, for ex, Guid, for this

var rand = Guid.NewGuid().ToString()
share|improve this answer
    
@SamIam something tells me, I am directing to correct path. – I4V May 8 '13 at 21:30
1  
I can't use a GUID. It number is passed to an external system that uses an string 8 characters long, otherwise I would use a GUID. – Xaisoft May 8 '13 at 21:36
    
@Xaisoft then you should device a good algoritm since creating a random number which is not generated previously(by making some lookup) can continue infinitely(?) in theory. Your best bet would be using a sequence then. Whether you like or not, all other answers are not acceptible (at least by me) – I4V May 8 '13 at 22:02

Not quite.

if (num is in table)
  return GenerateNumber();
else
  return num;

would work, but it's easier/safer to just loop:

int num;

do
{
   num = r.Next(1000);
} while (num is in table);

return num;
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks for this. – Xaisoft May 8 '13 at 21:38

No it won't. You need to get the number you get from calling GenerateNumber again.

public int GenerateNumber()
{
    Random r = new Randon();
    int num = r.Next(1000);

    //Psuedo-code
    if(num is in table)
     num = GenerateNumber(); //num = added.

    return num;
}

Now you don't need to recursively solve this, and in C# it isn't a good idea, because C# doesn't do tail optimization like other languages (it doesn't change a recursive call to an iterative one for you during compile time). This will work, but your doing extra work on the stack, and you could get a stack overflow error. However, since you asked, this is how you fix the code to work.

You can easily change it to not use recursion by doing:

while(num is in table){ //I always use brackets to be clear.
   num = r.Next(1000);
}
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Use iteration to avoid crashing with a StackOverFlow exception which will inevitably happen if your table is of sufficient size.

public int GenerateNumber()
{
    bool match = false;

    while (!match) {
        Random r = new Randon();
        int num = r.Next(1000);

    //Psuedo-code
    if(num is not in table)
        //insert
    }

    return num;
}
share|improve this answer
    
I will give this a try thanks. – Xaisoft May 8 '13 at 21:39

You don't specify what your database is. If it is just a in memory list of used numbers your code can simply done like this:

private HashSet<int> _usedNumbers = new HashSet<int>();
Random r = new Random(); //Search "Random is not random" on SO to see why I moved this out here.

public int GenerateNumber()
{
    int MaxNum = 1000;

    int num = r.Next(MaxNum);

    if(_usedNumbers.Count == MaxNum)
       throw new Exception("I ran out of numbers :(");

    while(_usedNumbers.Add(num) == false) //Add will return false if the number already was used.
    {
       num = r.Next(MaxNum );
    }

    return num;
}
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