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I've installed a hook on the recv-function in Ws2_32.dll. Now, when recv is called, I want to get information about who sent the information. So I tried the following to get the remote address of the sender, but the address I get is always wrong and very unrealistic for the internet (e. g. I get 2.0.0.80).

What am I doing wrong?

int __stdcall TcpHook::my_recv(SOCKET s, char *buf, int len, int flags)
{
    sockaddr addr;
    int len2 = sizeof(addr);
    getpeername(s, &addr, &len2);

    char *sender = inet_ntoa(*(in_addr*)&addr);
    // print out sender etc.

    return tcpHook.recvOriginal(s, buf, len, flags);
}

The interesting point is that I don't have any information despite of the passed s (type SOCKET).

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1  
You aren't checking the return value of getpeername. Also, we have no idea how you're hooking; you will get garbage if the hook isn't being executed in the process that owns the socket. –  Collin Dauphinee May 8 '13 at 21:47
    
The hook, of course, is in the same process as the original socket. I don't check the result because this is a proof of concept. I know I should do it, but this is not the fault. –  The Wavelength May 8 '13 at 21:53
    
Check ss_family of the sockaddr, this may not be an IPv4 address –  Collin Dauphinee May 8 '13 at 21:54
    
It is IPv4. I found an interesting answer in another thread: stackoverflow.com/a/8114503/1433564 - see the comments. It seems the described situation matches my case which could explain why I'm getting wrong results. –  The Wavelength May 8 '13 at 21:56
    
Yes, that would happen if this is a connectionless socket. –  Collin Dauphinee May 8 '13 at 22:01

1 Answer 1

I found the solution... I just failed. The correct code is:

inet_ntoa((*(sockaddr_in*)&addr).sin_addr);

It works.

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2  
This depends on the sockaddr_in and sockaddr being the same size. This happens to be true. Generally, you should use the right type of addr when calling getpeername(). –  jxh May 8 '13 at 22:24
2  
Don't add random casts to make your code compile. –  Nicholas Wilson May 8 '13 at 22:47

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