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Is this correct way to allocate pointer to pointer on stack and on heap? If not, then what is a correct way to do it?

int a=7;
int* mrPointer=&a;
*mrPointer;

int** iptr; // iptr is on stack
*iptr=mrPointer; //not OK
int** iptr_h = new int*(); // iptr_h is on heap
*iptr_h=mrPointer;

thanks to Mat's answer now I know that this is correct way to put it on stack:

int** iptr; // iptr is on stack
iptr=&mrPointer;

and this on the heap:

int** iptr_h = new int*(); // iptr_h is on heap
*iptr_h=mrPointer;
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4  
At the point *iptr=mrPointer;, iptr is uninitialised, so dereferencing it is undefined behaviour. –  Daniel Fischer May 8 '13 at 22:11
3  
What makes you think there is a right way to allocate a pointer to a pointer in C++? Instead of asking the right way to do this, you should ask about the right way to accomplish something (and this probably won't be the right way to do it). –  Jerry Coffin May 8 '13 at 22:12
1  
Yes, I do believe this is an "XY question" - you think Y is the solution to achieve X, so you ask how to do Y. It may be better to ask "How do I achieve X". It may not be a double pointer in the first place... –  Mats Petersson May 8 '13 at 22:16
    
no, I am interested in how to allocate pointer to pointer on stack and how on heap, and do it correctly, this is all –  AB_ May 8 '13 at 22:18
    
Question is worded strange. One could interpret it such that you want to allocate a pointer-to-a-pointer on the heap. To me, that means you want to allocate storage for int**, meaning you will get a pointer to that memory which will be a int*** which you will then store on the stack. The other interpretation is that you want to allocate a pointer on the heap and store a pointer-to-a-pointer on the stack. –  paddy May 8 '13 at 22:21

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

If you want a pointer to pointer that eventually points at the a variable, then this is how you do that.

int a=7;
int* mrPointer=&a;
*mrPointer;

int** iptr; // iptr is on stack
iptr=&mrPointer;

Edit: to clarify, in the above code I changed *iptr = mrPointer; to iptr = &mrPointer;.

This will indeed make a pointer to the same place, via the heap.

int** iptr_h = new int*(); // iptr_h is on heap
*iptr_h=mrPointer;

Edit to explain based on comment:

One could also see a need to do something like this:

int* mrsPointer;
int** iptr = &mrsPointer;
*iptr = mrPointer;
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this is it, thanks, I omitted the fact that I cant do *iptr because it was uninitialized, but if it was then *iptr=mrPointer is correct there, right? –  AB_ May 8 '13 at 22:24
    
@Mats: you put on the heap a pointer to an int. I kind of think he wants to put on the heap a pointer to a pointer to an int. int*** iptr_h = new int**(&mrPointer); –  Mooing Duck May 8 '13 at 22:25
    
See edit [filler] –  Mats Petersson May 8 '13 at 22:26
    
no, I wanted pointer to int to be put on heap. This is exactly this what I wanted –  AB_ May 8 '13 at 22:28

When you allocate space for the object using malloc or new, it will always end up on the heap. You may use alloca for stack allocations, but this is significantly more advanced and not recommended.

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This doesn't answer the question, and the use of malloc is shunned in C++. –  paddy May 8 '13 at 22:18
    
I answered 'how to allocate on stack/heap'. I included malloc to be complete, which is not irrelevant since many C++ projects interface with C. –  Marc Claesen May 8 '13 at 22:22
    
yes, I changed question latter to reflect comments/advices other participants –  AB_ May 8 '13 at 22:46

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