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Caveat: The example below is a bit contrived, but I am trying to learn about Delegates and Events in C#.

The code below consists of two classes: the MyClass class contains an ArrayList as a property, a delegate member, and the Event Handler member. The MainClass just has two functions the main() one and the function that the delegate invokes called theHandler.

My intent is when I .Add to the ArrayList instantiated in the myClass object: ClassObj in the do-while loop that the event handler calls theHandler function and writes to the Console what has been added. However, it doesn't seem to call the Handler function.

I know that the ArrayList is updating, and when I am using say a (string) instead of an ArrayList I am able to get the delegate/event process working.

public class myClass{

    public delegate void classEventHandler(ArrayList anArray);
    private ArrayList strArray = new ArrayList();
    public event classEventHandler arrayChanged;

    public ArrayList arrayVal{
        get{
            return strArray;
        }
            set{
            this.strArray.Add(value);
            this.arrayChanged(strArray);
        }
    }
}

class MainClass
{
    public static void Main (string[] args)
    {
        myClass ClassObj = new myClass();
        ClassObj.arrayChanged += theHandler;
        string str;

        do{
            str = Console.ReadLine();
            ClassObj.arrayVal.Add(str);
        }while(!str.Equals("exit"));

        Console.ReadLine();
    }

    public static void theHandler(ArrayList newArray){
        foreach(object o in newArray){
            Console.WriteLine("{0}", o.ToString());
        }
    }
}

My guess is that it has something to do with ArrayLists being used as class properties, but I am not sure.

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4  
How is ArrayList even in your .Net vocabulary anymore? –  Austin Salonen May 8 '13 at 22:44
1  
Do not use ArrayList. You should use generic collections like List<T>. –  SLaks May 8 '13 at 22:44
    
@AustinSalonen Heh, as my vocabulary is now just a few days old, maybe I can get a pass this time. Thanks though, I now know that ArrayLists are superannuated. –  Ahmad Ragab May 9 '13 at 1:43

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Tne problem is that ClassObj.arrayVal.Add(str) does not call the set method because it doesn't redefine arrayVal, it simply adds another element to the array. You need a method that adds the element to the array and also triggers the event:

public class myClass{

    public delegate void classEventHandler(ArrayList anArray);
    private ArrayList strArray = new ArrayList();
    public event classEventHandler arrayChanged;

    public void AddToArray(string value){
            this.strArray.Add(value);
            this.arrayChanged(strArray);
    }
}

And then in your loop you call it like this:

do{
    str = Console.ReadLine();
    ClassObj.AddToArray(str);
}while(!str.Equals("exit"));

You might also want to look into the ObservableCollection class. It allows you to set up a handler that is automtically invoked when the list changes

share|improve this answer
    
Thank you for the guidance, ObservableCollections will be my next stop. –  Ahmad Ragab May 9 '13 at 2:04

Your event will be fired only when you set the property with some new value

ClassObj.arrayVal = new ArrayList()

Following line will not call set - but will call get instead.

ClassObj.arrayVal.Add(str);
share|improve this answer
    
Thank you sir or madam that was exactly the issue. Now that I have learned this, I guess I will never use an ArrayList again, but imagine generics operate similarly in this context? –  Ahmad Ragab May 9 '13 at 2:03

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