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Lets say I have text file like this:

1 2 3
4 5 6
7 8 9
...

I want to read it into data structure like this:

h[1] = { "a" => 1, "b" => 2, "c" => 3 }
h[2] = { "a" => 4, "b" => 5, "c" => 6 }
h[3] = { "a" => 7, "b" => 8, "c" => 9 }

At first it seems easy. I use:

 lines=File.read(ARGV[0]).split("\n")
 h=[]
 lines.each ( |x| h << x.split())

And completely stuck at this point. How can I convert h to array of hashes?

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5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted
lines = File.readlines(ARGV[0])
lines.map { |l| x = l.split(/\s/).map(&:to_i); { 'a' => x[0], 'b' => x[1], 'c' => x[2] } }
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+1 nice answer! –  alfasin May 8 '13 at 23:18
1  
You made this a little harder than it needs to be. File.readlines already does the splitting on newlines (and works in Windows). split splits on whitespace without any arguments. –  Max May 8 '13 at 23:41
    
Thanks @Max. Adding that. Note that File.readlines leaves the \n at the end of each line, but to_i discards it –  Christian May 9 '13 at 11:45
def parse(filename)
  File.readlines(filename).map do |line|
    Hash[('a'..'c').zip(line.split.map(&:to_i))]
  end
end

parse(ARGV[0]) # => [{"a"=>1, "b"=>2, "c"=>3}, {"a"=>4, "b"=>5, "c"=>6}, {"a"=>7, "b"=>8, "c"=>9}] 
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+1 beautiful answer! –  alfasin May 8 '13 at 23:35
    
Ah yes, the functional approach. –  squiguy May 8 '13 at 23:46

There is a Gem you can use for this: smarter_csv

Put this in your Gemfile:

 gem 'smarter_csv',  '1.0.5'

and then:

 require 'smarter_csv'
 result = SmarterCSV.process('/tmp/bla.csv', 
         {:col_sep => ' ', 
          :headers_in_file => false, 
          :user_provided_headers => ['a','b','c'],
          :strings_as_keys => true
         }
 )
  => [{"a"=>1, "b"=>2, "c"=>3}, 
      {"a"=>4, "b"=>5, "c"=>6}, 
      {"a"=>7, "b"=>8, "c"=>9}] 

 result[0]
  => {"a"=>1, "b"=>2, "c"=>3}

See also: smarter_csv README

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I'd use:

require 'pp'

ary = []
DATA.each_line do |li|
  ary << Hash[%w[a b c].zip(li.split)]
end

pp ary

__END__
1 2 3
4 5 6
7 8 9

Running that I get:

[{"a"=>"1", "b"=>"2", "c"=>"3"},
 {"a"=>"4", "b"=>"5", "c"=>"6"},
 {"a"=>"7", "b"=>"8", "c"=>"9"}]

Change ary to h if you want that to be your variable name.

If you're reading from a file use File.foreach('file/to/read.txt') instead of each_line.

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My solution is not as elegant as Christian's:

base = ['a','b','c']
h=[]
i = 0 # traverses the a,b,c
j = 1 # traverses the lines of the hash h

File.open(ARGV[0]).each_line do |line|
  arr = line.split(' ')
  arr.each do |x|
    if !h[j].nil?
      h[j][base[i]] = x.to_i
    else # first entry in the hash should be set like this:
      h[j] = {base[i] => x.to_i}
    end
    i += 1;
  end
  i = 0
  j += 1
end
p h[1]
p h[2]
p h[3]

output:

{"a"=>"1", "b"=>"2", "c"=>"3"}
{"a"=>"4", "b"=>"5", "c"=>"6"}
{"a"=>"7", "b"=>"8", "c"=>"9"}

I started from j = 1 since that's what the OP asked for, even though it would probably make more sense to start from zero.

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