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I've created a few apps using Ruby on Rails now, but there's a few concepts that I haven't quite been able to get my head around.

One of these is how does the 'routing' process work? By that I mean, where a user enters a URL string and Rails serves the relevant assets in response to the URL.

Here's what I think is happening:

  1. A user browses to the server using their browser:

    http://0.0.0.0:3000
    
  2. They then prepend their URL with a string:

    http://0.0.0.0:3000/entries/view_all
    
  3. Rails' 'routes.rb' file specifies what the string should actually relate to via directives:

    match "/entries/view_all" => "entries#view_all"
    
  4. This above directive says that when the string "/entries/view_all" is prepended to a URL, execute the method view_all, found in the file 'entries_controller.rb'.

  5. The view_all method is executed:

    def view_all
      @entries = Entry.all(:order => 'created_at DESC')
    end
    

    It assigns all the entries from the table 'Entry' to the constant @entries, in descending order.

  6. Rails then magically knows to serve the user the 'view_all.html.erb'.

  7. An each loop inside the 'view_all.html.erb' displays relevant information from the 'Entry' table:

    <% @entries.each do |entry| %>
    <h1><%= entry.title %></h1> 
    <p><%= entry.content %></p>
    <p><em>Posted at <%= entry.created_at %></em></p>
    <% end %>
    

My questions are as follows:

  1. How wrong is my concept of how things work?
  2. In step #3 above, how does Rails actually know the view_all method is found inside 'entries_controller.rb'? The directive was entries#view_all, not entries#view_all. Does Rails automatically match the start of the controller file names inside the 'controllers' directory, and ignore the '_controller.rb'?
  3. In step #6 above, how does Rails 'magically' know to serve the 'view_all.html.erb' view? Is it similar to how I think it works in question #2? Does Rails match the 'view_all' part of the file name with the name of the method found in 'entries_controller.rb'?
  4. How is the object/constant @entries, and all its methods, "passed on" to 'view_all.html.erb' from 'entries_controller.rb'?
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This link should clear those doubts guides.rubyonrails.org/getting_started.html –  uDaY May 8 '13 at 23:38
    
instead of "prepend" did you mean "append"? –  inger May 8 '13 at 23:47
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3 Answers 3

up vote 3 down vote accepted

In response to (2) and (3) - Rails emphasizes convention over configuration, which results in seemingly magical coupling between the router, controllers, and view templates. For example, the router knows that entries refers to an EntriesController class because there's a line in ActionDispatch::Routing::RouteSet:

def controller_reference(controller_param)
  controller_name = "#{controller_param.camelize}Controller"
  ...

It's not magic - the "Controller" word is hard coded. It's just what Rails was programmed to expect given your inputs. And it's like this all over the place, which can be a bit daunting to comprehend when you're starting out with it (have a look at Ember.js for even more daunting magic like this).

In response to (4): Rails copies your individual instance variables into an ActionView instance. There is fairly significant contention in the community over whether it should really be doing this, but for now that's how it works, and you should keep that in mind when you are writing your controller actions. You don't want a lot of overhead in copying numerous or bloated objects that you don't need in the view.

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You got it, actually. It's all name matched. The Entry model matches up with the entries_controller which matches up with the entries view. The name of the specific view correlates with the controllers action.

@entries is an instance variable (called such as it's an instance of the whole model), as is any variable that starts with an @. Those variables in the controller are the ones that are available to the corresponding view.

A neat trick to use is the _enrty partial.

_entry.html.erb

<h1><%= entry.title %></h1> 
<p><%= entry.content %></p>
<p><em>Posted at <%= entry.created_at %></em></p>

Then in places that you want to call the index (your view_all is typically labeled as index), or parts there of, you can <%= render @entries %>

But yeah, a lot of the magic of rails is in the matchy matchy naming conventions. There are ways around that, as everything is customizable, but that sums it up. Cheers!

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1) How wrong is my concept of how things work?

Thats a pretty good way of thinking about how the process works

2) In step (3), how does rails actually know the 'view_all' method is found inside 'entries_controller.rb'? The directive was 'entries#view_all', not 'entries#view_all'. Does rails automatically match the start of the controller file names inside the 'controllers' directory, and ignore the '_controller.rb'?

Rails abides by a directive called "Convention over configuration", this means Rails will behave a certain way, as long as you give it instructions in the way it expects. So in your query above, because you specify the "entries" part of your controller it knows to go look in "entries_controller" for the "view_all" action

3) In step (6) how does rails 'magically' know to serve the 'view_all.html.erb' view? Is it similar to how I think it works in question 2? Does rails match the 'view_all' part of the file name with the name of the method found in 'entries_controller.rb'?

Convention over configuration aka "magic". Once Rails executes an action, it will look for the matching template to execute based on your request. if you made a request for an json page (by altering your request headers for example), it would look for view.json.erb. If you left out that template it would throw an error unless at the end of the action you used a render call to tell it to do something else

4) How is the object/constant '@entries', and all its methods, 'passed on' to 'view_all.html.erb' from 'entries_controller.rb'?

It just is :D, or are you asking to see the rails source code that is responsible for that?

ActionView (Views) and ActionController(Controllers) both inherit from Actionpack, so I imagine its not that hard to share variables between the two.

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