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I have a comp sci question that requires the following:

Write a method that takes a decimal number x and an integer n. Round x to n decimal places (for example, 0 means round to the nearest integer, 1 means round to the nearest tenth, etc.).

I don't see how this problem is even approachable using recursion, it seems too straight forward.

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1  
So... what's your question? –  Alvin Wong May 9 '13 at 1:02
1  
If it seems too straight forward why not do it yourself? –  chopchop May 9 '13 at 1:03
    
Recursion involves a repeated action. There is no repeated action in rounding off, so the problem cannot be solved using recursion. –  CodeBlue May 9 '13 at 1:08
1  
@CodeBlue Rounding is just a mathematical function. You can implement that function with recursion. Example: nullptr's answer. I think it may be worth bringing up the inherent deficiencies with rounding a base 10 number using binary representations though. –  rliu May 9 '13 at 1:14

2 Answers 2

It seems that using recursion here is simply counter-productive.

The recursive method suggested by nullptr:

double round(double x, int n) {
    if (n <= 0)
        return Math.round(x);

    return round(x * 10, n - 1) / 10;
}

is valid, but unnecessary. Essentially, that method is the same as:

double round(double x, int n) {
    double factor = Math.pow(10, n);
    return Math.round(x * factor) / factor;
}

This method would likely execute faster and would not risk a StackOverflowError (although that would be fairly unlikely, only with huge values of n).

You should use recursion for cases with a clear base case and simplification case, such as:

  • traversing a tree:
    • base case: no children
    • simplification case: each child
  • the factorial function:
    • base case: n <= 1
    • simplification case: factorial(n-1)

Rounding to n decimal places does not lend itself to recursion easily.


BONUS: Rounding to the nearest n th-fractional part in any base:

double round(double x, int n, int radix) {
    double factor = Math.pow(radix, n);
    return Math.round(x * factor) / factor;
}
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1  
I think you actually want to multiply and then divide as in nullptr's answer. Otherwise, round(3.1, 1) => .31 => 0 => 0. –  rliu May 9 '13 at 1:25
    
@roliu you're right, of course; fixed. –  WChargin May 9 '13 at 3:28

How about this?

double round(double x, int n)
{
    if (n <= 0)
        return Math.round(x);

    return round(x * 10, n - 1) / 10;
}

You'll have to adapt this a little if you can't use Math.round().

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