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How do I turn "1330" into "13:30", or "133000" into "13:30:00"? Essentially, I want to insert a colon between every pair of numbers. I'm trying to convert characters into times.

It seems like there should be a really elegant way to do this, but I can't think of it. I was thinking of using some combination of paste() and substr(), but an elegant solution is escaping me.

EDIT: example string that needs to be converted:

X <-   c("120000", "120500", "121000", "121500", "122000", "122500", "123000") #example of noon to 12:30pm
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Can you provide reproducible code to create the data you are looking at? –  Jake Burkhead May 9 '13 at 1:48
1  
as.POSIXct will do what you wish, using the correct format. –  hd1 May 9 '13 at 1:48

4 Answers 4

up vote 8 down vote accepted

This replaces each sequence of two characters not followed by a boundary with those same characters followed by a colon:

gsub("(..)\\B", "\\1:", X)

On the sample string it gives:

[1] "12:00:00" "12:05:00" "12:10:00" "12:15:00" "12:20:00" "12:25:00" "12:30:00"
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Wow, this is also a very nice answer. I'm learning a lot about regex() from the answer I'm getting to this question. I just spent about 10 minutes reading through ?regex, and decided I can't tell which answer is more robust, this, or the one posted by @flodel (I'm still not very familiar with regular expressions that well). It seems both answer are great. –  rbatt May 9 '13 at 3:31
    
Nice, I didn't know that b referred to boundaries! –  jbaums May 10 '13 at 0:39

You can use a regular expression with a positive lookahead:

gsub("(\\d{2})(?=\\d{2})", "\\1:", X, perl = TRUE)
# [1] "12:00:00" "12:05:00" "12:10:00" "12:15:00" "12:20:00" "12:25:00" "12:30:00"
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Excellent answer, thank you very much! –  rbatt May 9 '13 at 2:06

Using substring:

test <- "1330"
paste(substring(test,seq(1,nchar(test)-1,2),seq(2,nchar(test),2)),collapse=":")

#[1] "13:30"


test <- "133000"
paste(substring(test,seq(1,nchar(test)-1,2),seq(2,nchar(test),2)),collapse=":")

#[1] "13:30:00"

Or if you want an actual time representation you could do:

test <- "1330"
as.POSIXct(test,format="%H%M")
#[1] "2013-05-09 13:30:00 EST"

Which you can reformat like:

format(as.POSIXct(test,format="%H%M"),"%H:%M")
#[1] "13:30"
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+1 for homing in on the practical application and suggesting POSIXct, but the gsub() suggestion is a more general solution. Thanks! –  rbatt May 9 '13 at 2:03

Can do it with strptime in one step:

strptime(X, format="%H%M%S")
[1] "2013-05-08 12:00:00" "2013-05-08 12:05:00" "2013-05-08 12:10:00" "2013-05-08 12:15:00" "2013-05-08 12:20:00"
[6] "2013-05-08 12:25:00" "2013-05-08 12:30:00"

After the complaint about the dates in date-time objects, one can suppress that "artificial" reality with:

strftime( strptime(X, format="%H%M%S"), "%H:%M:%S" )
[1] "12:00:00" "12:05:00" "12:10:00" "12:15:00" "12:20:00" "12:25:00" "12:30:00"
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That adds an artificial month+day component to the output. –  rbatt May 9 '13 at 23:57
    
You did say you wanted times, right? –  BondedDust May 10 '13 at 0:23
    
Haha, there we go. –  rbatt May 10 '13 at 0:39

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